De gustibus est disputandum... ;)

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
Almond or hazelnut milk, on the other hand, is considerably tastier than cow's milk.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Almond or hazelnut milk, on the other hand, is considerably tastier than cow's milk.
never tried hazelnut milk, but I did try couple of times almond milk. There is nothing bad about almond milk IMHO.
My only observation is that almond milk is a bit sweeter than cow's milk.
I was told that home-made almond milk tastes better than store-bought.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
I don't even really consider milk a beverage. It's about as much a beverage (to me) as gravy is. I mean, I sometimes put it in coffee (I recently got the lactose-free stuff 'cause it was on sale), or would have it with cereal (if I ate cereal), or would use it to make pancakes or something (if I ever cooked), but why drink the stuff?

I'm a big boy, & big boys like me have better things to drink than goddamn moo juice (i.e. beer, coffee, mate, kefir, kombucha, strained beet puree, jaguar urine, unicorn tears, e.g. anything little kids don't like).
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
I never understood the phenomenon of alcopops (I am referring to commercial shite like Smirnoff Ice and Bacardi Breeze or any other vodka n' juice plonks).
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
I never understood the phenomenon of alcopops (I am referring to commercial shite like Smirnoff Ice and Bacardi Breeze or any other vodka n' juice plonks).
The last thirty seconds of this wee video might contain a clue.

 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
Alcohol is a drug. It doesn't taste very nice. For this reason, manufacturers have developed various ways of disguising the taste. Alcopops are an effective way of doing this – at least if you already have a taste for sweet soft drinks, which many teenagers do.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
@Terry S. the video you posted brought back some fond memories of my business trip to UK (of course 1st thing a foreigner had to try - Full English Breakfast and later Fish and Chips)
If not for the health's sake, I wouldn't mind eating a "Full English" Mon-Fr

 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
God. I'm not sure I could cope with that one day of the week. I like my porridge in the mornings; on special occasions I might have croissant or cake, but I never could see the attraction of eating a whole load of very fatty, greasy food at once.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
That looks delish, but I agree somewhat with Ἰάσων. It would sit a little heavy in the mornings, if you catch my drift. And if you don't, maybe a visual will drive the point home:

:bullshit:
 

Hemo Rusticus

Lounge Lizard
@Terry S.

What's the old bird say before: 'I could nae face that.' 1:22

'Generally, if I've been out the night ...'?
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
The most remarkable thing about the Full English breakfast IMHO, is it's similarity to the Full Scottish Breakfast, the Full Irish Breakfast, and the Ulster Fry. I think there is a thinly veiled love for pig-flavoured lard in these isles.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
The most remarkable thing about the Full English breakfast IMHO, is it's similarity to the Full Scottish Breakfast, the Full Irish Breakfast, and the Ulster Fry.
That's near heresy. At least whenever the subject comes up, as it often does, the Scots and the Irish go on about white pudding/square sausage/tattie scones and other local variants I've never come across that constitute the essential difference.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
That accent is difficult for me.
For me, too ... you probably have to have heard it more often, before, in order to get along.
I suppose the same can happen in your native language ;)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
For me, too ... you probably have to have heard it more often, before, in order to get along.
I guess so. Some accents are immediately easy (like the lovely Scottish accent of that archeologist guy I mentioned a while ago) but others...
I suppose the same can happen in your native language ;)
I've had trouble with some heavy Canadian French accents in the past, but overall I've rarely had difficulty with any native French accent. Now maybe I just haven't heard so many different ones. Also, I think the diversity is less in French than in German and perhaps English too.
 
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