declining words with -es genitive ?!?

PortamAperite

New Member
I'm finding words in Cassell's dictionary that I don't know what to do with
e.g. Aeropē, -es: the wife of Atreus and mother of Agamemnon and Menelaus
Aeglē, -ēs : a nymph, daughter of Jupiter and Neaera
or
Aenēis, -idos : Vergil's Aeneid

and I don't know what to do with these nouns. Are they 3rd declension but -es for genitive? what are they? and how do I decline them?
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
All of these are Greek nouns.
The first two are first declension with some peculiarities:
Aeropē, Aeropēs, dat. Aeropae, acc. Aeropēn, abl. Aeropē (voc. Aeropē)
You also might see masculine 1st-decl. nouns in -ās or -ēs, which decline like this:
Aeneās, Aeneae, Aeneae, Aeneān, Aeneā (voc. Aeneā)
Anchisēs, Anchisae, Anchisae, Anchisēn, Anchisē (voc. Anchisē)

For all of these, the plural declines completely regularly.

Aenēis is third declension with some peculiarities:
Aenēis, Aenēidos, Aenēidī, Aenēida, Aenēide
There is a great variety of Greek 3rd-decl. nouns worth learning.

For more information on Greek nouns in Latin, see A&G §44, §52, §81-83.
 

PortamAperite

New Member
All of these are Greek nouns.
The first two are first declension with some peculiarities:
Aeropē, Aeropēs, dat. Aeropae, acc. Aeropēn, abl. Aeropē (voc. Aeropē)
You also might see masculine 1st-decl. nouns in -ās or -ēs, which decline like this:
Aeneās, Aeneae, Aeneae, Aeneān, Aeneā (voc. Aeneā)
Anchisēs, Anchisae, Anchisae, Anchisēn, Anchisē (voc. Anchisē)

For all of these, the plural declines completely regularly.

Aenēis is third declension with some peculiarities:
Aenēis, Aenēidos, Aenēidī, Aenēida, Aenēide
There is a great variety of Greek 3rd-decl. nouns worth learning.

For more information on Greek nouns in Latin, see A&G §44, §52, §81-83.
All of these are Greek nouns.
The first two are first declension with some peculiarities:
Aeropē, Aeropēs, dat. Aeropae, acc. Aeropēn, abl. Aeropē (voc. Aeropē)
You also might see masculine 1st-decl. nouns in -ās or -ēs, which decline like this:
Aeneās, Aeneae, Aeneae, Aeneān, Aeneā (voc. Aeneā)
Anchisēs, Anchisae, Anchisae, Anchisēn, Anchisē (voc. Anchisē)

For all of these, the plural declines completely regularly.

Aenēis is third declension with some peculiarities:
Aenēis, Aenēidos, Aenēidī, Aenēida, Aenēide
There is a great variety of Greek 3rd-decl. nouns worth learning.

For more information on Greek nouns in Latin, see A&G §44, §52, §81-83.
gratias do, et nunc plus verba quid me eos facere inscire

that was a great help.
I've got another one for you:
istic istaec, istoc : that of yours : istic labor, Pl.; istuc considerabo, Cic.; istaec loca, Cic. L.f
i figure its similar to the iste, ista, istud pronoun but can't say for certain how its declined.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Think hic, haec, hoc, but replace h with ist. It's generally more rare and archaic.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
It declines as 3rd decl. plural, with the only difference being the genitive plural in -eon.
 

BadButBit

Member
That's a neat concise way to put it.
By the way, this doesn't make any grammatical sense.
('PortamAperite' was a temp login until I got my old one back online again... here I am, BadButBit )
"gratias do, et nunc plus verba quid me eos facere inscire" was intended to mean "thank you, and now there are more words which I do not know what to do with"
the indirect statement 'me eos facere inscire' uses the accusative subject/infinitive verb tense, is that not correct?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No, it is not correct.

Let me take things one by one:

1) One usually says gratias ago, not do.

2) Plus should be plura to agree with verba.

3) "Not to know" is nescire, not inscire.

4) There is no reason for "I don't know" to be in the infinitive since it isn't part of an indirect statement. The accusative and infinitive would be used if you were saying "I say that I don't know...", for example. The underlined part there would be an indirect statement.

5) "What to do" needs a verb in the subjunctive. Latin doesn't use infinitives in indirect questions. The accusative me should also be removed. Indirect questions aren't the same as indirect statements. Indirect questions take a verb in the subjunctive with a nominative subject (if any is expressed) while indirect statements take the accusative and infinitive.

6) Eos is both in the wrong gender (it's masculine while the word that it refers back to, verba, is neuter) and in the wrong case (accusative while you need an ablative to express the idea of "with"). It's also the wrong sort of pronoun altogether. You need a relative pronoun for "words which (this is a relative pronoun) I do not know what to do with".
 
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