DO NOT POST GOOGLE TRANSLATE (OR ANY OTHER MACHINE TRANSLATION)

Imprecator

Civis Illustris
Re: Sticky: WARNING RE INTERNET TRANSLATORS

I was playing AC the other day when this I encountered this music:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDrOFEsV2GI[/youtube]

"Aetas sancto aetas nam regna
Aetas sancto aetas nam regna
Recessus animae sancta
Recessus animae sancta"

:shakehead:
 

Portia

New Member
Re: Sticky: WARNING RE INTERNET TRANSLATORS

But but I love online Latin translators! They are the only beings that can give me a superiority complex when it comes to translating Latin as opposed to an inferiority complex.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
:hysteric:
And an appropriate sig to go with it...
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Wow...

Would you guess that the poster-maker put that in as filler text and expected the customer to change it?

I assume that not too many in your quarter can read English :p
 

Imprecator

Civis Illustris
I think so, too. Since we only begun to teach it recently, only the younger generation (which would include me, I suppose =P) has in-depth knowledge of it.

In fact, I can just picture the scene...

Confused intern sits with laptop, english-russian dictionary in one hand, cigar in other
Enter hairy, obese middle-aged manager wielding half empty bottle of vodka

"Hey Giorgi, did you finish translating that poster yet?"
"I can't figure out what this part says" -points at casualty-
-scratching chin- "Huh. I think that's CNSUNLTY. Did you try looking that up?"
"Yeah, and I couldn't find it in here. So I just left the whole thing in english"
"What about this other phrase here?" -points at lorem ipsum-
"None of those came up in the lexicon, so I figured they were american cinema slang, or something"
"Harasho*... Well, Mamuka and I are going to go get some khinklebi. Wanna come?
"Sure!" -closes laptop, promptly forgets about poster-
*Russian for "alright". We shamelessly borrow their words, even when we have perfectly fine native equivalents
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Haha, that could be near the truth. They should hire you - I'd write a letter of recommendation for you, but why bother when I could just send a lorem ipsum?

khinklebi
Those look good.
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
I believe that the magazine that is simply called Magazine writes in Latin (using Google Translate and InterTran of course). It is based in the basement of an apartment in central Moscow with a view of the Kremlin and St. Basil's Cathedral. Where can I get a copy of it?
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
It appears to me that Ruse is a video game and not a movie. I thought I might have found their tag line but no luck. My guess is that someone was supposed to find a flattering comment about this game in a magazine -- ANY magazine -- but that part never got done.
 

Piteye

New Member
Translators on the internet are useful if you just need a individual word to be translated, just don’t try complete sentences.

Just like Wikipedia is great quick guide but if you’re doing some real research information you’ll need to open a book at some point.
 

Bestiola

Speculatrix
Staff member
Not quite, if you try to translate a random word (I used "man" and "power") it was more or less accurate from Latin to English but not vice versa - it always placed the noun into the accusative case.

With all abundance of the dictionaries available on-line I don't see the need to use Google translator for such purpose.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Machine translation

I'm increasingly amazed by the trust people put in appallingly bad machine translation. I've just Googled for ‘Latin online translator’, and the first result was http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_translators.php?from=English&to=Latin. When you enter a phrase, it takes you to a new page: http://www.tranexp.com:2000/

Let's see how this ‘translator’ deals with incredibly simple phrases.

First, the famous ‘Veni, vidi, vici.’

It gives us ‘To come vidi , conquer.’ In other words, it has taken three identical forms (each meaning ‘I did [a certain action]’, and managed to translate them in three different incorrect ways. The first one has become an infinitive, the second has been left in Latin, and the third become the base form of the verb. The first comma has been swallowed up, and the second one has inexplicably gained a space before it. These are not typing errors: the text was generated by a computer. Needless to say, the correct translation is ‘I came, I saw, I conquered’.

What happens if I enter the phrase all in capitals, Roman-style? ‘To come’ stays the same, ‘VIDI’ is now in all caps, but ‘conquer’ now gets an initial capital: ‘To come VIDI , Conquer.’. Bizarre.

Now, I'm sure that my next text will totally confound it. In Latin, ‘v’ and ‘u’ are graphical variants of the same letter. Let's enter ‘ueni, uidi, uici.’ It spits out ‘ueni uidi uici.’ That's right: it has ‘translated’ this into English by... removing the commas.

This next one is going to be a disaster; I can feel it. Let's enter the same phrase, but marking the long vowels with macrons: Vēni, vīdī, vīcī. When we are transferred to the next page, we see ‘VÄ“ni, vÄ«dÄ«, vÄ«cÄ«.’ in both the source and target box. Even the source text has not be correctly sent to the machine translator. OK, let's help it out and re-type it into the new window. The result? ‘Vni vd vc.’ That's English, apparently.

OK, it looks like we'll have to enter things in a specific format only, and even then it will get it mostly wrong. Let's give it the benefit of the doubt. Maybe it's just shaky on the perfect tense, eh?

Here's another sentence: ‘Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres’. This is another one from Cæsar, and it means ‘All Gaul is divided into three parts’. I literally laughed out loud when I read the output: ‘Hen is all to divide upon faction three’.

Let's feed this back into the translator, and then again and again, like photocopying a photocopy. The meaning should drift slightly, but it should remain a correct, comprehensible sentence. (!)

‘Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres’‘Hen is all to divide upon faction three’ → ‘Gallina est totus divido super partes three’ → ‘Hen is whole to divide over, upon faction three’ → ‘Gallina est universus divido super , super partes three’ → ‘Hen is combined in one to divide over, upon , over, upon faction three’ → ‘Gallina est universus divido super , super , super , super partes three’ → ‘Hen is combined in one to divide over, upon , over, upon , over, upon , over, upon faction three’.

Note that it has not even managed to translate the incredibly easy word ‘three’ (in Latin: ‘trēs’) into Latin.

OK, maybe I'm being unfair again. That sentence is a bit long, and perhaps it's not good with proper nouns. Let's give it simple phrases from everyday speech.

* These ones come up with a note saying ‘InterTran automatically switched the source and target languages because there was no translation for your original query.’
I am really about to die from laughter.
 

Arca Defectionis

Civis Illustris
Have you guys ever used Bad Translator? It uses Bing translation to translate a phrase out of English into another language and back to English, 35 times. For example:

Bad Translator dixit:
From English: I came, I saw, I conquered.
To Japanese: 私は、私が見た、来た私を征服しました。
Back to English: I came I saw I conquered.
To Korean: 내가 서 난 정복 보았다.
Back to English: I saw I conquered.
To Latvian: Es redzēju, I conquered.
Back to English: I saw, I conquered.
To Italian: Ho visto, che ho conquistato.
Back to English: I saw, I conquered.
To Lithuanian: Aš pamačiau, aš atėmė.
Back to English: I saw, I conquered.
To Arabic: شهد أنا غزا.
Back to English: Saw I conquered.
To Norwegian: Så jeg erobret.
Back to English: So I conquered.
To Chinese Simplified: 所以我征服了。
Back to English: So, I conquered.
To Portuguese: Então, eu conquistei.
Back to English: So, I conquered.
To Polish: Tak I podbił.
Back to English: Yes, and conquered.
To Romanian: Da, şi cucerit.
Back to English: Yes, and conquered.
To Catalan: Sí i va conquerir.
Back to English: Yes i conquered.
To Spanish: Sí conquistó.
Back to English: Yes, he conquered.
To Slovak: Áno, on si podmanil.
Back to English: Yes, he conquered.
To Czech: Ano, on si podmanil.
Back to English: Yes, he conquered.
To Slovenian: Ja, on osvojili.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Russian: Да, он выиграл.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Chinese Traditional: 是的他贏得了。
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Swedish: Ja, han har vunnit.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Danish: Ja, han har vundet.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Thai: ใช่ เขาได้ชนะเลิศรางวัล
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Turkish: Evet, o kazandı.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Dutch: Ja, hij won.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Ukranian: Так, він виграв.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Finnish: Kyllä, hän voitti.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Vietnamese: Có, ông đã giành.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Estonian: Jah, ta on võitnud.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To German: Ja, hat er gewonnen.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To French: Oui, il a gagné.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Greek: Ναι, έχει κερδίσει.
Back to English: Yes, he has won.
To Hebrew: כן, הוא זכה.
Back to English: Yes, he won.
To Haitian Creole: Wi, li genyen.
Back to English: Yes, it has.
To Hungarian: Igen, ez van.
Back to English: Yes, it is.
To Indonesian: Ya benar.
Back to English: Yeah right.
:hysteric:
 

gangleri2001

Active Member
From English: Hannibal at the gates.
To Arabic: هانيبال عند البوابات.
Back to English: Hannibal at the gates.
To Bulgarian: Ханибал в портите.
Back to English: Hannibal at the gates.
To Czech: Hannibal branami.
Back to English: Hannibal gates.
To Finnish: Hannibal porttien.
Back to English: Hannibal ports.
To Dutch: Hannibal poorten.
Back to English: Hannibal ports.
To Catalan: Ports d'Hannibal.
Back to English: Ports of Hannibal.
To Chinese Traditional: 漢尼拔的港口。
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To French: Port d'Hannibal.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Estonian: Sadama Hannibal.
Back to English: Port Of Hannibal.
To Chinese Simplified: 汉尼拔的端口。
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Greek: Θύρα του Αννίβα.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Danish: Port af Hannibal.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Swedish: Port av Hannibal.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Portuguese: Porto de Aníbal.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To German: Hafen von Hannibal.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Slovenian: Vrata Hannibal.
Back to English: Port Of Hannibal.
To Hebrew: יציאה של חניבעל.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Haitian Creole: Pò Hannibal la.
Back to English: Port Hannibal.
To Korean: 포트 한니발입니다.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Indonesian: Port Hannibal.
Back to English: Port Of Hannibal.
To Italian: Porto di Annibale.
Back to English: Port of Hannibal.
To Lithuanian: Hanibalas uosto.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Norwegian: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Polish: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Russian: Ганнибал.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Romanian: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Spanish: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Vietnamese: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Hungarian: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Slovak: Hannibal.
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Japanese: ハンニバル。
Back to English: Hannibal.
To Thai: Hannibal
Back to English: Hannibal
To Turkish: Hannibal
Back to English: Hannibal
To Ukranian: Hannibal
Back to English: Hannibal
That's one lazy translator.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Let's try something more complex for fun.

Ita est: non accepimus brevem vitam, sed facimus; neque inopes eius sed prodigi sumus. Sicut amplae et regiae opes, ubi ad malum dominum pervenerunt, momento dissipantur, at quamvis modicae, si bono custodi traditae sunt, usu crescunt, ita aetas nostra bene disponenti multum patet.

Google translates:

The fact is, we have taken no short life, but we do, nor lack of it, but are wasteful. Just as great and princely wealth, where they came to a bad owner, scattered in a moment, however limited, if they are delivered to keep that which is good, they grow: they use, so our life is well disposing has wide range.

I was expecting worse, actually. I had already tried it with an exerpt from a letter of Cicero's, into French, and it had given something just hilarious. Let's try some Virgil:

O qui res hominumque deumque
aeternis regis imperiis et fulmine terres,
quis meus Aeneas in te committere tantum,
quid Troes potuere, quibus tot funera passis
cunctus ob Italiam terrarum clauditur orbis?
Certe hinc Romanos olim volventibus annis,
hinc fore ductores, revocato a sanguine Teucri,
qui mare, qui terras omnes dictione tenerent,
pollicitus: quae te, genitor, sententia vertit?


O you who terrify them with lightning, and the matter of your eternal orders and granted that God and men, who may have committed against you my Aeneas only, what do the Trojans to whom, after the deaths of so many who have suffered on account of the whole world is closed off to Italy? At all events, the years rolled on this side, once the Romans, on the other would be leaders, he invited him again, from the blood of Teucer, who the sea, all the lands an expression that would hold the: me and thee the opinion turns?
 
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