Don't be afraid, be resilient, always believe in yourself

AlSo

New Member
Hi everyone!

I'm thinking of a tattoo (as a reminder to myself): "Don't be afraid, be resilient, always believe in yourself".

I have already found the most part in previous threads and only missing the "be resilient" part:
"Noli timere, be resilient, tibi semper confide"

Also, would "and" instead of a comma change the phrase much: "Noli timere, be resilient and tibi semper confide" ?

Many thanks in advance for your help!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
maybe
facilis esto
I don't think that's very close to the idea of "be resilient". It sounds more like "be easy(-going)" to me.

There's no exact Latin equivalent of the word "resilient" but perhaps you could say something like resurge, "rise again".

As for the "and", you could add -que after tibi (tibique semper confide) but it's unnecessary.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
How about

Noli timere, ad resistendum te para, semper tibi confide ?

Cf. Cicero, Att. 2, 21, 6 (Ad resistendum me paro.)
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Alternative:

Noli timere, paratus esto ad resistendum, semper tibi confide!

(Word for word: Don't be afraid, be prepared to resist, always believe in yourself!)
 

AlSo

New Member
I don't think that's very close to the idea of "be resilient". It sounds more like "be easy(-going)" to me.

There's no exact Latin equivalent of the word "resilient" but perhaps you could say something like resurge, "rise again".

As for the "and", you could add -que after tibi (tibique semper confide) but it's unnecessary.
Thanks a lot for your comment!

What would be the equivalent of "be flexible"? Resilient in the sense "rise again" does reflect, in a certain way, the ability to adapt to change...

Also, out of curiousity - doesnt resilience have latin roots? (Maybe with a different meaning though...)

Thanks again!
 

AlSo

New Member
Alternative:

Noli timere, paratus esto ad resistendum, semper tibi confide!

(Word for word: Don't be afraid, be prepared to resist, always believe in yourself!)
Thanks for the suggestion!

Actually I would be looking for a term opposite to resistance:)

Resilience=ability to rebound, for me reflects more of a flexibility that being able to resist....
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Active Member
What about the adjective "tenax"-"tenacious":

Noli timere, tenax sii, tibi semper confide

It is still very long for a tatoo. I know it is nice to have a customized thing... But why don't you go for the classic:

Semper adamas

literally: "Forever strong like a diamond"

I remember of a guy that thought "adamas" had something to do whit "Adam". Actually the two things have nothing in common.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
... Noli timere, tenax sii, tibi semper confide
Oro te scribas „tenax esto“. ( „sii“: Suppongo che tu viva in Italia :) „est quod fulmine ecc.“ Pascoli ! )

Good suggestion: Semper adamas. literally: "Forever strong like a diamond"
(or perhaps: „Forever adamantine“)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Also, out of curiousity - doesnt resilience have latin roots? (Maybe with a different meaning though...)
It does. It comes from the verb resilire, which means to jump back, rebound. However, the etymological source of the adjective "resilient", which is the Latin participle resiliens, "jumping back/rebounding", would be a bad translation because it doesn't have the figurative meaning that its English descendant "resilient" has acquired.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Active Member
Oro te scribas „tenax esto“. ( „sii“: Suppongo che tu viva in Italia :) „est quod fulmine ecc.“ Pascoli ! )

Good suggestion: Semper adamas. literally: "Forever strong like a diamond"
(or perhaps: „Forever adamantine“)
Sì, dall' "Italia raminga" di Pascoliana memoria. D'Annunzio (fu un ottimo scrittore ma una pessima persona) ha coniato il motto "Semper adamas" attorno al 1920. Grazie per la correzione.

It was an italian poet who conceived the motto "Semper adamas". His name was D'Annunzio, some sort of miles gloriosus, very lavish with his money. The american actress Isadora Duncan allegedly said: "D'Annunzio is the most wonderful lover of our time".
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Active Member
adamas > adamántinus = cedere nescius > How about "Noli timere, cave cedas, semper tibi confíde"
You see it's pretty difficult.
Does cave cedas mean "beware to retreat"?
It is slightly better, because it's shorter. Mind: I have no tatoo, but since (as far as I know) it's performed with a needle of some kind, I would say: the shorter the better.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
Cave cedas = Noli cedere (cf. Virgil's famous verse "tu ne cede..." (Aeneis 6, 95).
I intended to form the alliteration cave cedas.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Active Member
At first I thought it shared a slight resemblance with "numquam retrorsum" regarding the meaning of the phrase. But as they say, "quot capita, tot sententiae".

I agree on "Cave cedas". It's shorter and therefore better IMHO, even if it doesn't follow strictly the original "be resilient".
Of course, it's not my skin that is going to be marked. The final choice is for AlSo to make.
 

EstQuodFulmineIungo

Active Member
Well, "Treccani" is the italian equivalent of "Britannica". It's a real treasure. When in doubt I always browse in there. If only the Encyclopaedia wasn't so expensive I would buy the paper version straight away! The online version is free and has never failed me so far BTW.

Vedo che lei è un buongustaio!
 

AlSo

New Member
adamas > adamántinus = cedere nescius > How about "Noli timere, cave cedas, semper tibi confíde"
You see it's pretty difficult.
Thank you so much guys for your help!

Just to be sure: cave cedas = "beware to retreat" in the sense "do not back down/give up", correct?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes.
 

AlSo

New Member
At first I thought it shared a slight resemblance with "numquam retrorsum" regarding the meaning of the phrase. But as they say, "quot capita, tot sententiae".

I agree on "Cave cedas". It's shorter and therefore better IMHO, even if it doesn't follow strictly the original "be resilient".
Of course, it's not my skin that is going to be marked. The final choice is for AlSo to make.
Thanks a lot for caring about the technical side of getting a tattoo!
No worries about the length though, the meaning and correctness are most important:)

Surprised that theres no simple translation of resilient in latin.... Will really have to choose from different alternatives.
Thanks again for the suggestions!
 
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