Dream as if you'll live forever, Live as if &c

trd

New Member
I dont know how it'll translate, but I was wondering what this quote would be in latin.

'Dream as if you'll live forever, Live as if you'll die today'

Hope someone can help me, thanks
 

LDV

Civis Illustris
maybe:

Somnia quasi in aeternum victurus sis, vive quasi hodie moriturus sis


or maybe semper instead of in aeternum



Wait for other and better translations!:)
 

trd

New Member
Thanks

Thanks, i've had a little look around and that seems right but its for a tattoo so if you're not too sure I'll hang on to see if anybody disagrees.
 

trd

New Member
Ghandi said something very similar somethin, James Dean just kinda updated it but he gets most credit. Bit of a james dean fan, yeah.

Any idea's if that translation was right?
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Does "somniare" indicate "dream while asleep" rather than "dream" = "to have an inspiration?"

There's the cognate insomnia so I think it is the former.
 

LDV

Civis Illustris
will someone comment on translation :wondering:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
hi will you plz help me translate this

I’D RATHER DIE ON MY FEET THAN LIVE ON MY KNEES


waiting for reply

Thanx
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Lit.:
Malim mori in pedibus quam vivere in genibus.
More fluid and logical:
Malim mori stans quam vivere ingeniculans.
Literally meaning "I would rather die standing than live kneeling."

Ingeniculans is somewhat clunky however, and there doesn't seem to be a non-clunky alternative...bah.

Also, please don't make requests in other people's threads, it makes the forum make a lot less sense.
 

skinnylizard77

New Member
'somniare' means to dream while asleep. To aspire to something you could use 'appetere,' so the quote would become:
appete quasi in aeternum victurus sis, vive quasi hodie moriturus sis

You also could drop both 'sis' if you wanted:
appete quasi in aeternum victurus, vive quasi hodie moriturus


Another possibility for 'in aeternum' is 'semper' (always):
appete quasi semper victurus, vive quasi hodie moriturus
This gives slightly better balance I think, balancing a single word against 'hodie'
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Dream as if you'll live forever... as if you'll die tomorrow

Hi Everyone,

I was hoping that someone could help me translate the following phrase from English into Latin:

'Dream as if you'll live forever. Live as if you'll die tomorrow'

Thank you
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Please can you help me translate?

Somnia quasi in perpetuum vivas, vive quasi cras morieris.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Re: Please can you help me translate?

It should be moriaris. And somnia doesn't mean "dream" in the positive sense that the English word conveys.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Re: Please can you help me translate?

Actually, this would probably work better with participles:

Spera quasi in perpetuum victurus. Vive quasi cras moriturus.
[to a male person]

Spera quasi in perpetuum victura. Vive quasi cras moritura.
[to a female person]

Sperate quasi in perpetuum victuri. Vivite quasi cras morituri.
[to multiple persons]

Spero is the closest Latin equivalent of "to dream" I can think of. I'm open to other suggestions.
 

Chamaeleo

New Member
Re: Please can you help me translate?

Matthaeus dixit:
Somnia quasi in perpetuum vivas, vive quasi cras morieris.
Present subjunctive in the first and future indicative in the other? That can’t be right.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Please can you help me translate?

Yeah, I don't know what I was thinking :wondering:
To me, victurus can be both 'about to live' AND 'about to conquer'. Or does the amibiguity really not matter in the context here?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Re: Please can you help me translate?

you could make it clear by adding macrons: vīctūrus
victūrus (from vincere) has a short i
 
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