everything happens for a reason

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
"ex nihilo nihil fit" sounds to me more like "if you don't try, you'll never make it"
I've mostly heard it in philosophical contexts (which is how I interpret the OP's phrase).
 

TattooReason

New Member
"ex nihilo nihil fit" sounds to me more like "if you don't try, you'll never make it"
I agree, sh*t! :D

LEAR (…) what can you say to draw a third more opulent than your sisters? Speak.
CORDELIA Nothing, my lord.
LEAR Nothing!
CORDELIA Nothing.
LEAR Nothing will come of nothing. Speak again.
CORDELIA Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave my heart into my mouth. I love your Majesty according to my bond; no more nor less.
[2]
(I. 1.)
@Bitmap and if you think about my reason, do you agree with nihil fit sine causa?
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I know.
I think of it as the former.
Well, now I'm wondering. Come to think of it, the original phrase could mean either:

"Everything happens for a reason" -> "nothing can occur without some cause"

or

"Everything happens for a reason" -> "there is some ultimate rationale/purpose/end for the sake of which everything that happens, happens."
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
"Everything happens for a reason" -> "nothing can occur without some cause"
That's how some people argued ... even 12 years ago ...

"Everything happens for a reason" -> "there is some ultimate rationale/purpose/end for the sake of which everything that happens, happens."
That's how I understand it.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Well, now I'm wondering. Come to think of it, the original phrase could mean either:

"Everything happens for a reason" -> "nothing can occur without some cause"

or

"Everything happens for a reason" -> "there is some ultimate rationale/purpose/end for the sake of which everything that happens, happens."
I understand it as 2) as well. In both cases I understand "some reason" as opposed to "no reason".
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
I could see someone understanding #2 in the sense of "certain [unspecified] reason" more easily, though.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I could see someone understanding #2 in the sense of "certain [unspecified] reason" more easily, though.
Really? When I hear "for a reason" my instinctive interpretation is that the point is that there is a reason for whatever thing is being talked about, as opposed to there being no reason, it being just random.
 

TattooReason

New Member
Really? When I hear "for a reason" my instinctive interpretation is that the point is that there is a reason for whatever thing is being talked about, as opposed to there being no reason, it being just random.
I cannot agree. Unspecified reason does not mean random reason.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Unspecified reason does not mean random reason.
I've never said it did.

What I'm saying is that I interpret "for a reason" as the opposite of "for no reason". When I hear "for a reason" I take the point to be that there is a reason.

For instance "everything happens for a reason" to me means "things don't happen for no reason", "things don't happen randomly".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Nihil fit sine causa was originally written in a different context: with reference to cause and effect (as in, say, the cause of a glass breaking being the fact that it was dropped) rather than final causes/purposes/aims (as in, say, the reason of some shit happening being that God wanted to teach someone a lesson). But I guess there's no reason why it couldn't, in theory, also work for the second meaning.
 

TattooReason

New Member
I've never said it did.

What I'm saying is that I interpret "for a reason" as the opposite of "for no reason". When I hear "for a reason" I take the point to be that there is a reason.

For instance "everything happens for a reason" to me means "things don't happen for no reason", "things don't happen randomly".
I am sorry, I was confused by "it just being random" but I understand now.


Nihil fit sine causa was originally written in a different context: with reference to cause and effect (as in, say, the cause of a glass breaking being the fact that it was dropped) rather than final causes/purposes/aims (as in, say, the reason of some shit happening being that God wanted to teach someone a lesson). But I guess there's no reason why it couldn't, in theory, also work for the second meaning.
I think no one around me understands Latin so perfect to argue with me if the first or the second should be applied to my tattoo, haha. :) Based on this, do you agree with it? Better than omnia causa fiunt? :D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
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