False but amusing friends

Tironis

Civis Illustris
Kan ik contant betalen? (Dutch) - Kan jeg betale kontant? (Danish) - Can I pay in cash?
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
"bar" is usually used in the sense of "cash", but it can also mean "bare" or "devoid of" in German.
What about in the word wunderbar? It doesn't seem to correspond to either meaning.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The -bar in wunderbar is an adjectival suffix, related to the English verb "bear", I believe, so wunderbar = kind of literally/etymologically "wonder-bearing".
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
By the way, being an adjective and not a noun, it shouldn't be capitalized... I don't know why I followed your capitalization at first, but I've edited now.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Lol. I capitalized it, without knowing why, following you, who capitalized it without knowing why.
 

Tironis

Civis Illustris

Hemo Rusticus

Jive Turkey
The -bar in wunderbar is an adjectival suffix, related to the English verb "bear", I believe, so wunderbar = kind of literally/etymologically "wonder-bearing".
I always wondered ( :hat: ) about that. Nice little nugget.
 

Bestiola

Speculatrix
Staff member
South Slavic (Serb, Croatian, Bosnian, Montenegrin...or any political denomination) kokoš - hen; Romanian cocoș - cock.

South Slavic (Serb, Croatian, Bosnian, Montenegrin...) vatra - fire; Romanian vatră - hearth

South Slavic (Serb, Croatian, Bosnian, Montenegrin...) staja - a place for cattle; Bulgarian одая - room

South Slavic (Serb, Croatian, Bosnian, Montenegrin...) kmet - peasant in the middle ages; Bulgarian кмет - mayor
 

Hemo Rusticus

Jive Turkey
I was surprised to learn that the standard Polish for 'love' (v.) is not of the shape *lubić (which is a Polish word, but rather means 'like/be pleasing', cf. L lubet), as a Russian student might expect, but rather kochać, which shows considerably wide disagreement among scholars as to its origin. To me the most plausible is cognate with R касаться, which is used in the gospels as a token of respect, to 'touch' the hem of Jesus' garment (& so the semantics would be something like 'be attentive/respectful, have a care (for something)').

However, there is the possibility it has an erotic connotation & is cognate with the Slavic for 'rooster', e.g. OR куръ 'cock' (are chickens known for their copulative efficiency? :chicken: ) & perhaps also, both morphologically & semantically, with English 'coax'.

Which brings me to the last, similarly erotic (possible) reflex, found in Latin coxa, with an inherited meaning something along the lines of 'embrace (someone) by the waist/haunches'.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
@Hemo Rusticus,
despite certain differences I am pretty sure that you, Quasus, LCF , Lysandra and Akela would have little problems in communicating verbally with Poles
Some more false friends Polish-Russian

 
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Quasus

Civis Illustris
Cum olim Polonice meo sponte discerem, non arbitror me facillime cum Polonis colloqui posse. :)
 
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Adrian

Civis Illustris
Mi Quase, vir es doctus, credo igitur te sine (multis) difficultatibus cum Polonis colloqui posse.:D
 

Hemo Rusticus

Jive Turkey
@Hemo Rusticus,
despite certain differences I am pretty sure that you, Quasus, LCF , Lysandra and Akela would have little problems in communicating verbally with Poles
Some more false friends Polish-Russian

Mihei uidetur duas uenustulas doctores efficaces fieri. :drool:
По-моему, это не недовольство учиться у двух красавиц.
 

Hemo Rusticus

Jive Turkey
@Adrian, извини ты, товарищь, но я забыл, какой твой (или твои) родной язык?
 

Hemo Rusticus

Jive Turkey
Ach! I thought only Matthaeus was a native. Idk why I thought you spoke maybe Slovak or something... :oops:
I even sent him a PM (which he hasn't answered as he hasn't been around in a while), but you will be indispensable in helping me out, if you're willing!
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Just rememebred some Russian- Polish false friends (I mentioned it somewhere else , but I couldn't find it)
сутки (sutki - day; in Polish it means nipples)
сливки (slivki -cream, in Polish it means prunes)
кровать (krovat - bed, in Polish it means a tie)
вредный (vrednyj- noxious; in Polish it means mean/shabby)
закон (zakon- law, in Polish it means convent)
жалоба (zaloba- a complaint; in Polish it means mourning)
зажигалка (zarzygalka -lighter; in Polish it means vomiter)
and many, many more...
 
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