Feminine forms of "mīles" and "eques"

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Ah -- I had just checked the entry under puer, thinking that any odd variants would be listed there. But apparently it's more common than I thought, enough so to merit an entry of its own, even.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I wasn't trying to be critical, just engaging in playful speculation :D
Either way, I guess it's a good thing to mention exceptions. There must be other pairs like puer/puera, though I can't think of any other noun like that at the moment (I can only think of the adjective liber/libera/liberum).
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There's adulter/adultera but it's basically an adjective that can be used as a noun.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It would logically be puera, no?
Not according to the rule as I stated it (replace -er with -ra). That was the point.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
There's adulter/adultera but it's basically an adjective that can be used as a noun.
Hm, I'm not sure about that, actually. The OLD has different entries for adulter and adultera as nouns and for adulter, a, um as an adjective — so did it start off as an adjective or a noun?
 

Serenus

legātus armisonus
There's adulter/adultera but it's basically an adjective that can be used as a noun.
Adulter adultera is interesting because it's literally ad-ulter, but ulter has the feminine and neuter forms ultra ultrum.

Along the same lines there's dexter dextera/dextra dexterum/dextrum, and the -fer/-ger adjectives in general (stēlliger stēlligera stēlligerum). At a stretch into Old Latin you could make superus/super supera superum count --super is basically just pre-Classical though.
 
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