Forever and Always

Swinn13

New Member
I'm so pleased to see there are so many responses on other posts. And i respect the latin language, i wish it was spoken more. I want to get the phrase "Forever and Always" for my first tattoo. I would appreciate however close anyone can help me come to the translation. Thanks so much!
 

Decimvs

Aedilis
Staff member
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

There is an English to Latin translation area further down the page, this is just the area for talking about elements of Latin language.

In perpetuum semperque. - OR - In perpetuum et semper. - Lit. Forever and always.

*this is by no means the 'only' way to express this, others may offer advice as well.

I cannot say for sure whether or not this on its own would mean anything to an ancient Roman though. They are both adverbs, so they make more sense when in the context of a full sentence with a subject and verb, etc.

An English example would be if I had a tattoo that just said "Seriously and completely." Maybe to me I know that it is in reference to me being a musician, or a scholar, but to the uninitiated viewer, the two words are really ambiguous.

We could construct some things for you if you want to provide more context. Are you talking about your love for someone? Your dedication to some pursuit? Otherwise, if you want it to just be kind of vague and ambiguous, there you go. :)

And, welcome to the forum.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

Isn't there a sticky with all the common tattoo requests?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

I have moved the topic to the translation forum.

You may wish to see this summary of translations for always and forever.
 

Swinn13

New Member
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

I tried to post a reply earlier, it doesnt' look like it worked so forgive me if i mention this twice. Thanks for your help Decimvs, since you mention it that way it would also sound great as a sentence. Something along the lines of, "I will love you forever and always" or "You will have my love, forever and always." Or if there's any other saying that's used more commonly in latin that is close to that. I'd like to say I admire those who study Latin and I would love to devote my time to learning about this fascinating language in the future.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

Don't postpone for a future date; start now! Carpe diem!
 

deudeditus

Civis Illustris
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

Seize the carp!!
 

Decimvs

Aedilis
Staff member
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

Swinn13 dixit:
"I will love you forever and always" or "You will have my love, forever and always." Or if there's any other saying that's used more commonly in latin that is close to that.
Te semper et in perpetuum amabo. - I shall love you always and forever.

A person could also get very creative with the word order here, a beauty of Latin is that order is highly flexible, unlike English.

"Semper te in perpetuumque amabo." I like the flow of this as I say it. I like the sound of this sentence, but I like the look of the sentence below more.

or

In perpetuum te semperque amabo. - This arrangement seems very beautiful to me because the word "te", "you", is almost the direct center of the sentence. It seems to display visually that the direct object of the sentence is sandwiched between the concepts of 'always' and 'forever.' It shows the person being surrounded by this idea of an everlasting love, which is beautiful.

Other people will have comments and suggestions about this I am sure, so don't run out and commit this to your skin or anything just yet! :nono: Wait for other replies. I like the look of the sentence above, but others may have better ideas.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

My comment is this: why say both 'always' and 'forever', if 'forever' is already enough of a concept for 'eternity' and implies 'always'. To me, it's just redundant. Other comments...
 

harmlessgoat22

New Member
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

Always and forever, while pretty much the same, have subtle differences. Always means "at all times", for instance, "in good times and bad, in sickness and in health", as is stated when getting married. Forever means "at any time period", more as in "today, tomorrow, and 50 years from now", more than just specific instances.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

I think forever is a stronger word than always. It's called hendiadyoin, a rhetorical device describing one concept through two. Also called hendiadys.
 

Dottychic

New Member
Always and Forever

I was really suprised to not find this in the search facility, can you please translate this phrase for me,.... Always and Forever...... Thanks. :D
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Re: Tattoo help please

Semper et in perpetuum

Another, semper et in aeternum is common on Google... but I'm uncertain about its validity.
 

kenfu

New Member
Re: Translation for tattoo, please help.

Te semper et in perpetuum amabo. - I shall love you always and forever.

A person could also get very creative with the word order here, a beauty of Latin is that order is highly flexible, unlike English.
...
In perpetuum te semperque amabo. - This arrangement seems very beautiful to me because the word "te", "you", is almost the direct center of the sentence. It seems to display visually that the direct object of the sentence is sandwiched between the concepts of 'always' and 'forever.' It shows the person being surrounded by this idea of an everlasting love, which is beautiful.
I really like this. I am going to be proposing to my girlfriend soon, and I always tell her "I love you forever and always, and (in) all ways." I am wondering if there is a way to add "and (in) all ways" to "In perpetuum te semperque amabo" that plays on either "perpetuum" or "semperque"? Thank you for your help!
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Whoops, little typo: (In) all ways = Omni (modo)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Modo isn't optional but necessary. Or omnimodis/omnibus modis.

Personally, to keep Decimus' "symetry" with te in the middle, I'd put it like this: in perpetuum omnibus te modis semperque amabo. I will love you forever in all ways and always.
 
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