From science comes wisdom

Vexillus

New Member
Hello,

I'm new to the forum, in fact this is my first post. I have zero knowledge in Latin language and after reading some posts here, I found this forum to be incredibly useful.

I'm currently in change of leading a team to devise a motto for an academic unit. We have agreed that in English the motto should read (mean):

"from (=out of) Science to (=comes) Wisdom"​

Is "ex Scientia ad Sapienta" correct to convey that meaning?


I also may have the need to write the following branding (also for academic unit) in Latin:
Progressive * Critical * Humanistic

(each word stands by its own and do not form a sentence). Can anyone help to write the above three words in Latin?

Thank you in advance.
 

Vexillus

New Member
I would translate it as "Per scientiam ad sapientiam".
Thank you very much! Forgot to mention that the phrase will appear somewhere around the seal.

In case there is other matching translation I'd also love to know very much.

Is the implication that ''we are (all of the following)'' ?
Correct; supposedly those are the defining characteristics of the civitas academica (= We are progressive. We are critical. We are humanistic).

Progressive . Critical . Humanistic will probably appear along with, but not a part of, the logo.
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
The concepts are modern so the Latin words are as well.
I can see your point, and I can't think of a solution without neologisms that uses adjectives like that.

If you want something more Classical, my best suggestion is to go for abstract nouns instead and have some approximate equivalences:

novitas : investígátio : húmánitas

In the sense of 'Innovation: Inquiry : Humanism'.
 

Vexillus

New Member
Progressivi - Criticales - Humanistici
Thank you Imperfacundus! However as Iáson mentioned, I'm still looking for a more Classical-sounding motto.

novitas : investígátio : húmánitas

In the sense of 'Innovation: Inquiry : Humanism'.
I notice that you use English nouns instead of adjectives... do you think we can have better result if the motto employ nouns instead of adjectives? Apologize for the question but I really have no understanding on Latin grammar (English is not my native language as well).

I really like "novitas" but not so much with "investígátio" and "húmánitas".

I'm wondering whether: " advancement : curiosity : tolerant " have classical Latin equivalents too?
 

rothbard

Civis Illustris
Staff member
I really like "novitas" but not so much with "investígátio" and "húmánitas".
About "humanitas", I suggest you take a look here.

I'm wondering whether: " advancement : curiosity : tolerant " have classical Latin equivalents too?
Maybe "progressus : curiositas : aequitas". I can't think of a classical Latin word which is exactly equivalent to "tolerance". By the way, in your motto you may want to leave out the apices to denote long vowels (such as those on the u and a of "húmánitas") since they are not normally used when writing Latin these days .
 

Vexillus

New Member
About "humanitas", I suggest you take a look here.
Thank you very much! I realized now that "tolerance" is too narrow to convey the full meaning of "humanistic." I guess it's "humanitas" then :)

Maybe "progressus : curiositas : aequitas". I can't think of a classical Latin word which is exactly equivalent to "tolerance".
Out of curiosity: is it possible to change " progressus : curiositas : humanitas" into their adjective forms? If it is then we have parallels to the original English, but if its's not: "progressus : curiositas : humanitas" it is.

By the way, in your motto you may want to leave out the apices to denote long vowels (such as those on the u and a of "húmánitas") since they are not normally used when writing Latin these days .
Lastly, are we strictly required to use "u" or can "v" be also used? (PROGESSVS : CVRIOSITAS : HVMANITAS ?)
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
prógressus can also be an adjective (or rather, a participle from prógredior), but it means something rather different from 'people who favour advancement'.

cúriósitas (itself a very rare word) has a much more common adjective, cúriósus 'inquisitive' - among other meanings.

húmánitas has an adjective húmánus. I'm not sure whether it would be the best choice for 'humanistic', though.
 

rothbard

Civis Illustris
Staff member
Lastly, are we strictly required to use "u" or can "v" be also used? (PROGESSVS : CVRIOSITAS : HVMANITAS ?)
In ancient Rome there was no distinction between "U" and "V". In formal writing, the capital letter "V" was always used. In Roman cursive it looked more like a "u". See here.
 
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