Grant me the power to bring forth the surrounding heat to myself.

Would anyone be so kind as to translate the following:

Grant me the power to bring forth the surrounding heat to myself.

This is once again for my list of fictional incantations that I am working on translating into Latin with the utmost desire for accuracy.

Also, what would the most appropriate cases to use for each part of the above sentence.

an addendum, As I am male I am writing all the incantations as I am speaking them.
 

Araneus

Umbraticus Lector
Could you please explain a bit more first:
- Is "the surrounding heat" to be understood as a figurative heat? If so, in what kind of figurative sense?
- I don't understand exactly how you would "bring forth" what is already surrounding (you?) and then apply it to yourself? Could you rephrase it a bit more deliberately so that we understand how this is - well - supposed to be understood? Then we can of course go back to your original phrase and make a Latin translation for that.

It's just that it seems very abstract. That's probably intentional, and unproblematic per se, but Latin is a very concrete language, so we would need to know exactly how this is supposed to be understood.
 
In the Mage: The Awakening RPG, The spell is described as giving the magic user the power influence ambient heat and the examples given in the description for is as follows:

"The mage can guide the direction and/or flow of existing heat. He could for example, keep warm in cold weather by pulling the ambient heat warmth shed by other human bodies to himself..."

That is why I worded the incantation the way I did.

Grant me the power to bring forth the surrounding heat to myself.

I used the phrase bring forth not as a means of creation but to describe the magic user as attracting the ambient heat closer to his physical location.

I used the phrase surrounding heat as another way of saying ambient heat because I could not find a Latin word for ambient.

Would this be a better format:

Grant me the power to attract the ambient/surrounding heat to warm myself.

I hope this explains the question.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Grant me the power to attract the surrounding heat to myself: Da mihi potestatem circumfusi caloris ad me attrahendi.
 
Another way to interpret the spell is that the magic user is manipulating the surround heat so that instead of the ambient heat being spread over a large area, he is willing it condense itself so that it only occupies an area with only a one foot radius of him.

Thank you Pacifica, though I have a question?

Could I word your translation as such:

Mihi potestatem attrahendi (In the ifinitive) caloris circumfusi ad me

Would calor circumjects also work or is your phrasing the most accurate?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Mihi potestatem attrahendi (In the ifinitive) caloris circumfusi ad me
It isn't complete, as you've forgotten the da. You can say da mihi potestatem attrahendi caloris circumfusi ad me if you wish, though I'm not sure why you don't like my word order.

Attrahendi isn't an infinitive; it's a gerundive, but you probably haven't learned that yet.

Would calor circumjects also work or is your phrasing the most accurate?
Circumiectus works too, yes (in the appropriate case of course).
 
I meant to put it at the end as such:
Mihi potestatem attrahendi caloris circumfusi ad me da.

also what would be the appropriate case if I used calor circumjectus instead?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I meant to put it at the end as such:
Mihi potestatem attrahendi caloris circumfusi ad me da.
I guess it isn't really wrong, but it doesn't feel optimal to me, maybe a bit clumsy.

But why do you want to change the order of what I gave you?
also what would be the appropriate case if I used calor circumjectus instead?
The case would remain the same as in my version (i.e. genitive).
 
I mean no offence I am just used putting the verb at the end of the sentence even though word order is not all that important in Latin.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The verb isn't always best put last.
 
Ah, my apologies again forgive me for once again getting ahead of myself. I will continue learning but thank you for your patience.

Would I be wise to rewrite all my translations to put the verb first as the all follow this same format?
Again I do apologize for getting ahead of myself as my passion for learning sometimes overrides my patience.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You mean they all follow the format "grant me the power to do so and so"? If yes, then maybe you should, yes.
 

Araneus

Umbraticus Lector
I am just used putting the verb at the end of the sentence even though word order is not all that important in Latin.
Word order is quite free, sure, but still important. (Very) simply put, the most important word in a sentence is often the first, and the second most important is often the last. The verb and the subject can be either of course, but imperatives are often placed first, hardly ever last.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
imperatives are often placed first, hardly ever last.
"Hardly ever last" is probably an exaggeration, but they indeed have much less of a propensity to come last than other verbs. Particularly when the sentence is relatively long, like here, where, to me at least, da at the end feels a bit clumsy, as I said.
 

Araneus

Umbraticus Lector
"Hardly ever last" is probably an exaggeration
Probably, and it depends on the sentence. It would normally be placed after a "si" clause for instance.

But IMO, this is something you learn more from reading and getting used to Latin syntax than from memorizing rules.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
But IMO, this is something you learn more from reading and getting used to Latin syntax than from memorizing rules.
Yes, so it seems to me too. It's hard to give real rules concerning word order; although a few general principles can be laid down, for all the rest it's more a question of feeling case by case to me.
 
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