Greek-Latin New Testament

Does anyone know of a Greek-Latin New Testament (and/or OT w/ the Septuagint) that uses the Clementine Vulgate rather than the Vulgata Nova? Since my use of the Vulgate is primarily liturgical, this is a strong preference. Thanks!
 

Clemens

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

Incidentally, the traditional text of the mass and the offices are a combination of the Vetus Latina, the Vulgate, and the Roman Psalter, which is not usually the version included in the Vulgate. For example, Psalm 109:3 in the liturgy is tecum principium in die virtutis tuae: in splendoribus sanctorum genui te, but in the Vulgate it's usually populi tui spontanei erunt in die fortitudinis tuae in montibus sanctis quasi de vulva orietur tibi ros adulescentiae tuae.
 
Incidentally, the traditional text of the mass and the offices are a combination of the Vetus Latina, the Vulgate, and the Roman Psalter, which is not usually the version included in the Vulgate. For example, Psalm 109:3 in the liturgy is tecum principium in die virtutis tuae: in splendoribus sanctorum genui te, but in the Vulgate it's usually populi tui spontanei erunt in die fortitudinis tuae in montibus sanctis quasi de vulva orietur tibi ros adulescentiae tuae.
Yes, I know that Jerome translated the psalms directly from the Hebrew - preferring that to the older translation from the Spetuagint that was already in use - but my Editio Quinta from the Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft Vulgate, for example, includes both the older version (which was already used liturgically at the time of Jerome's translating/editing/compilation) as well as Jerome's translation from the Hebrew. I wish I had a hard copy of the Clementine Vulgate. However, here, I'm primarily interested in the NT. Since the Epistle and Gospel of the Mass come from Jerome's Vulgate, I'm not too concerned about variance.

@ Devenius Dulenius - I'm only interested in a print edition. I can use New Advent or other sources for a side-by-side, but I get tired of staring at a screen.

Thanks to you both!

Edit to add: I'm primarily interested in a Greek-Latin edition because my Latin is pretty good, but I'm looking to improve my Greek.
 
Hard copy source for Clementine Vulgate (paperback or hardcover): https://www.churchlatin.com/the-latn-vulgate-printed-editions

Amazon (U.S.) page for Greek-Latin editions (some new, some used): https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Novum+testamentum+graece-latine&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss

The Nova Vulgata was first published about 1978 or 1979, so the Greek-Latin editions published before that most likely have Jerome's Vulgate. I am not familiar with all of them. Hopefully checking the Amazon page will help. Another possible guide to this is the book by Houghton:

H.A.G. Houghton, The Latin New Testament: A Guide to Its Early History, Texts, and Manuscripts, Oxford University Press, 2016

Print edition (from publisher), $47.95 hardcover, $25.95 paperback (may be available elsewhere)

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-latin-new-testament-9780198744733?cc=us&lang=en&

PDF edition: free, open access from publisher

http://fdslive.oup.com/www.oup.com/academic/pdf/openaccess/9780198744733.pdf

I have the PDF. I know he discusses modern editions of the Vulgate but I don't know if he covers the Greek-Latin editions. Hopefully I can take time soon to read the book. :)

Ideally, a Greek Textus Receptus with a parallel Vulgate would be best to have a Greek text similar to what Jerome worked from. I don't know if such was done after Erasmus, though it might be. I also saw online a print edition of Erasmus' text with the Latin. Not sure whether it was on Amazon or elsewhere. In his case, he wanted to offer his own improved Latin version and used the Greek to show support for it. I did some reading on the history of his text a while back. Seems like he did at least one edition with the Greek, the Vulgate, and his own Latin version in parallel, with notes/commentary on the Latin texts. The downsides of Erasmus' Greek texts are two-fold: 1) Poor manuscript support: only a half dozen Greek MSS or so, none earlier than the 12th century A.D. Revelation was missing some verses in the copy he had so he back-translated his Greek from the Vulgate to fill the gaps. This produced some Greek readings in Revelation that exist in no known Greek manuscript. There are also some places in Acts where texts in Erasmus' Greek only are supported by the Vulgate. 2) The fonts used are based on the medieval cursive Greek letters, with ligatures, so hard to read at times for the modern reader. As far as I know nobody has produced a modern transcription of his Greek text in a current Greek font. That would be lovely to have.

Of course, if you primarily want the texts for devotional/liturgical use, the text-critical considerations may not be relevant for you.

Hopefully these thoughts will send you in the right direction, at least. I'd be interested in hearing which Greek-Latin edition you settle on. I would like to have a print version of that myself, although I do enjoy using the Nova Vulgata ( I have the printed NT Graece-Latine with Nestle Greek text (I think 27th ed. and the NV).

Pax tibi,

Devenius Dulenius
 
Another Greek-Latin print option, definitely with Jerome's Vulgate: C.F. Matthei's edition (1782-1788), modern reprint, via Powell's Books:

https://www.powells.com/book/novum-testamentum-xii-tomis-distinctum-graece-et-latine-ed-cf-matthaei-9781343213265/61-0

About twenty years ago, while living in a suburb of Portland, Oregon (home of the physical Powell's store; there was a branch where I lived), I would spend many happy hours both in the Tigard location and the downtown Portland original location. I bought some books too. One of the greatest used book stores on the planet. Some new books too. Another great one, Half Price Books in Texas. Good memories! So many books, so little time and money. Happy hunting!
 
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Clemens

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

What text type did Jerome work from? He certainly couldn't have worked from the Textus Receptus, since it was compiled by Erasmus, but was it a Byzantine text-type? I know the rest of the New Testament (not the Gospels) reflect the Alexandrian text type. In any event, I think Jerome's Gospels are just revisions of the Vetus Latina and not wholly new translations by him.
 
Mea maxima culpa, amice Clemente. Recte habes. I should have written "Byzantine-type" text not Textus Receptus. You're right, the TR as such was not available to Jerome. It basically started with Erasmus, based on late MSS, most of which were of a Byzantine type. That is my understanding, also, that Jerome revised the Gospels of the Vetus Latina rather than translating afresh. From what I've read, the MSS he worked from were apparently of a Byzantine type. That is probably why I said Textus Receptus. Not of course the most precise way to put it, I agree.
 
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