Greek: Wedding chant

Amor

New Member
Ave!

I have this song which contains chanting in latin. I'd like to know what is being sung in it. I've uploaded it so you can listen for yourself. http://rapidshare.com/files/141529095/Trevor_Jones_-_08_-_The_Wedding.mp3.html (Just select "free user" and wait for 30 seconds)
http://www.speedyshare.com/403657586.html

When you listen you will notice that it just begins with some generic non-lyric chanting, but after 20 seconds there are obviously lyrics in it. I understand it might be difficult to hear them, but if you could hear anything I'd appreciate if you could write it down here!

Thanks!
/Amor
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
It's Greek, from a very common liturgical phrase in many Christian churches (Roman Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, etc.) I can't make out what comes before, but starting at 0:28 I hear:

[men's voices] Χριστὲ ἐλέησον, Κύριε ἐλέησον

[woman's voice] Κύριε ἐλέησον, Χριστὲ ἐλέησον, Κύριε ἐλέησον, Χριστὲ ἐλέησον, Κύριε ἐλέησον

[together] ἀμήν

Transliterated: Christé eléison, Kýrie eléison, Kýrie eléison, etc.; amén.

"Christ, have mercy; Lord, have mercy; Lord, have mercy; etc.; amen"
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I listened to it again, and the first part sounds a bit like benedictus Iesus Christus, which is Latin and part of a traditional Catholic prayer called Laudes Divinae (the Divine Praises): "Benedictus Iesus Christus, verus Deus et verus homo," which means "Blessed be Jesus Christ, true God and true man." I'm not absolutely certain that's it, though; the voice is so low I can barely hear it.
 

Amor

New Member
Thank you for your help! I think both your transcriptions are correct, so it's both Latin and Greek mixed. Though the first part sounds more like "Benedictu Iesu Christu", without the "s".

The only thing I don't really hear is the final line. Are you sure it's just "Amen"? Because it sounds to me it's a word with three syllables (not just two like "Amen").
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Amor dixit:
Thank you for your help! I think both your transcriptions are correct, so it's both Latin and Greek mixed. Though the first part sounds more like "Benedictu Iesu Christu", without the "s".
It sounds like that to me as well, but "benedictu" and "Christu" aren't valid forms. It could be "Benedicte Iesu Christe", which are the vocative forms of those words, and it would then mean "O Blessed Jesus Christ". Or possibly even "Benedico Iesum Christum", as M's tend to be pronounced lightly. The meaning ("I bless Jesus Christ") makes the last one unlikely, however.

The only thing I don't really hear is the final line. Are you sure it's just "Amen"? Because it sounds to me it's a word with three syllables (not just two like "Amen").
I'm pretty sure it's "Amen". It does sound like three syllables (aaah-aaah-MEN!), but I think that's just the effect on the ear of the first syllable being held for so long and with some of the singers joining in halfway through the note. I can't think of anything else it could be, and "amen" is how these chants are usually concluded.
 
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