Health and fitness

Adrian

Civis Illustris
A thread dedicated to all matters concerning health, fitness, sport, active life style etc.

A thread where you can post your tips & tricks and share your experience and knowledge with others.

1. The most crucial aspect is decision to act. It is difficult, but one has to do it. To find motivation you have to find supporters (family, friends) who can motivate you.

2. Second decision is to find help (subscribe to fitness channels, consult a specialist, ask around, read books etc.),

3. Try to gradually but consequently eliminate white refined sugar from your life - eat dark chocolade, use sugar surrogates like xylitol or erythritol, use honey.

4. Use unflavoured dairy products like natural jogurt, buttermilk (if you like flavors - add minced fruits or natural unsweetened jams). Try to replace butter with natural cheese spread.

5. Drink a glass of mineral water ca. 30 min before a meal.; drink a glass of mineral water if you feel hungry.

6. At least twice a week min. 30 minutes of physical excertion (walking, running, cycling etc. - to increase calory burning you can put a backpack with weight like mineral bottles or use wrist/ ankle weight bands)
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Sue Simkins, Sugar Free Baking

Goodreads dixit:
The potentially toxic effects of sugar are now well known. This book shows how you can still eat the food you enjoy by replacing sugar with a natural sugar substitute.

You’ll find sugar-free, and therefore healthier, recipes for:

- Brownies
- Muffins
- Sponge cakes and fruit cakes
- Scones, pies and tarts

The delicious recipes in this book use xylitol as a natural sugar substitute, because it has benefits for your teeth, and for those with diabetes, and is much less fattening than sugar. Because xylitol is as sweet as sugar, you can use exactly the same amount of xylitol as you would use sugar in your baking recipes.
 

Godmy

A Monkey
Reviving this public thread!

Who wants to talk publically about exercising or diet or body transformation, you can post here :)

I posted a lot about this somewhere else (not going to link where), and I can be pretty verbous, so, I don't want to repeat everything here, but anyway, my results in the recent 4 months is about gaining 4 kg of new lean mass (=pure muscle*), and about 2kg of fat (+ I had a pretty low body fat % before), right now I'm losing (very very very slowly and gradually, I'm in no hurry + I want to preserve the muscle gains too) some of the fat I think I don't necessarily need (0.5kg to 1kg) and potentially still gaining new muscle mass (by recomposition).

I exercise at home or outdoors : -)

Out of 4-5 meals, except maybe one of them (sometimes) I prepare myself. Currently I eat around 10800kj (2600kcal) every day and around 1.7grams of protein per every kilogram of my weight daily. (around 2 thirds of it is usually the so called "complete protein" + the rest).

*pure muscle also means, obviously, water that is naturally contained in the muscle, muscle is 80% water, that's just how it works :) it's still a great result, I mean :- D
______________________

My current* lifts:

bench press / floor press**: around 95% of my body weight (62kg)
deadlift: slightly above 100% of my weight (67kg)
barbell back squat: 95% of my bw. (62kg) <- will be tested tomorrow, maybe changed.

I can currently get (safely) from the floor over my head a 52kg barbell (by a split-jerk technique)...

+... millions of other exercises that would take too much space to mention, not as important (number-wise).

*it can really change any day, even tomorrow
**doing that at home, but I'm not lying on the floor completely, I'm a little bit elevated, which puts me somewhere between the bench and floor press range of motion, if necessary

_______________________________

(If you wonder, I'm 1.7m tall, the total body weight now around 65kg, +-11% body fat)

Tagging people who could potentially participate in this public thread in the future: @Laurentius, @Adrian, @Hawkwood, @rothbard, @AoM, but anyone else is invited too! :)
 
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Adrian

Civis Illustris
I am currently on new diet ( new type of 2200kcal diet - lots of breakfast dishes based on skyr yogurt, oatmeal and chia seeds)
I managed to benchpress 80kg ; but most of the time I train with 40kg barbell.
I started going to work on foot.
 
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Godmy

A Monkey
An exercise that really got my metabolism running the most, after a barbell back squat, surely the deadlift! But you really need to make sure with this one the technique is correct (and start with really low weights to make sure you don't do it wrong), better see 10 videos of how to do it correctly than do a wrong a deadlift. But the benefits it has: for the whole posterior chain, your posture, most of the lower and middle back, overall strength - incredible! And yes, it's very taxing for the metabolism, for the energy! But as I say, the technique is incredibly important there not to risk any injury.

(But then, it is also true that from all big barbell lifts, the deadlift may be the safer in the sense that if you drop the bar, nothing happens at all, unlike with the bench press or a barbell squat where it can be pretty dangerous).
 
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Godmy

A Monkey
But as I say, the technique is incredibly important there not to risk any injury.
On the other hand, a successful deadlifter will have a much lower risk of an injury in the real life while doing casual lifts of objects from the floor, since the deadlift is the most ubiquitous type of lift ANYONE does in their real life with anything that lies on the ground: bags, backpacks, parents lift their children, manual workers lift heavy stuff to carry from point A to the point B, or when moving furniture... and if none of them ever trains the deadlift, they risk injuries (lower back injuries) while just doing this casual stuff.

The deadlift is really important to train for everybody! :) Everybody should deadlift: males and females...! (even if with low weights or at least the "Romanian deadlift" version)
 
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Godmy

A Monkey
TBH I would never want to look like Arnold. My goal is to achieve slender wiry "dry-cut" physique similar to Jason Statham


But my foremost goal and aspiration is to build up condition and muscular strength (like the one seen among martial arts practitioners)
And you can achieve it! Just keep the diet and learn (=it took me several years to learn properly) how to train with high intensity! It can be even lower weights or various kinds of chest expanders, but when the muscle starts to feel "the burn", resist it as long as possible, even count 10 additional reps (if it's not a heavy weight for your measures anyway) - that / this intensity really gets the muscles moving anytime you feel you're starting to stagnate for certain body parts + it helps also with the total strength next time ;) As they say: get used to the pain!


(when I say pain, I always mean while it's safe and not risking an injury, usually with 40-60-70% of the maximum weight you can comfortably lift on the given exercise)
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
One important aspect that my dietitian advised me - introduction of natural "Testosterone boosters" :
garlic, parsley, beans, cinnamon, egg yolks, peepers (all shapes and colours); salt water fish (especially Atlantic mackerel , Cod, Alaska Pollock)
 
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Tironis

Member
Have only just come across this thread. Well, if I could just add: avoid farmed salmon, stick to wild salmon. Also, avoid bottled water - tap water is a safer bet and obviously free. Go easy on salt. Not absolutely sure of my fact here: but drinking lots of mineral water can apparently lead to kidney stones.
 

Godmy

A Monkey
Go easy on salt.
It may, in fact, be quite the opposite of what you usually learn about salt if you look at it closer. I train with salt! :cool:

I wrote some long messages regarding this: sodium, hypertension, sodium deficiency, etc., I'm copying them here:


Heh, interesting. I use no stimulants, but actually before every training I'm taking a small tea spoon (let's say 1/4 of teaspoon) of salt. It works instantly, it gives me quite a strong pump, focus... everything. It seems that the general populace and mainly athletes may rather lack sodium. Although there are some controversies surrounding sodium and its ill effects, but they are likely outdated (but are still kept as recommendations, probably out of inertia), this guy gives a good summary of it:




But I have to say that it changed my trainings. That is my only "preworkout" that I require.

... and most importantly, this!

More about:


Salt before training:


Recently I have watched a Czech video where some body builder makes an interview with a doctor (who himself has been strength training for the last 10-15 years or so) and who takes a professional interest in all the science connected to muscle hypertrophy, nutrition, hormones and even about the chemistry of steroids (that he stays miles away from, since he probably knows too well the side effects it causes). This video was about the micronutrients: vitamins and minerals: whether their supplementation makes any sense for athletes at all or whether it's all just a placebo effect (spoiler: often it's not, in some SENSIBLE doses). But at one point he mentioned salt before training, I translated that part for you:


(26:10)

A: ... and then I discovered, when it comes to minerals, salt.

B: Salt is great!

A: Ordinary cooking salt. If you have no salt, you can't have the pump, you retain no hydration/water in your muscle, your blood pressure is low, you feel sick during the training. So ordinary salt: a gram or two grams of salt into a half a liter of water

B: Always before the training.

A
: ... before the training, you can add some protein there, eat some carbohydrates. So 1) your insuline levels will be increased 2) you have liquid in your veins that can than pour into the muscles and the following training feels ABSOLUTELY different - there is no comparison to any of the PREWORKOUT supplements, such an easy trick.

....

B: I'm glad you mentioned the salt, because many people buy Preworkout suppelements or the "PUMP" supplements, but I always tell them "without the salt"...

A: It won't work.

B: ... and I know so many people (athletes) who tell me: "Well, I don't use salt much, I don't use it at all."

A: It's terrible.

B: I tell them: "you won't feel the pump, there won't be any real muscle contraction even the fat gets burnt badly without any salt". I tell them: "How the hell you want to have a pump without salt?".

A: Of course!

B: It's exactly as you said: salt and carbohydrates, let's be honest, if you take these, it will give you such a PUMP than some giant amount of arginine (=preworkout supplement).

A: Exactly.

B: That's why the body builders feel such a pump after a competition, because before they wouldn't use much salt and suddenly they start to use a lot of it and eat carbohydrates and suddenly they become huge. Of course, after some time, the muscle will release some of the water/hydration but usually they had a great form on the second day.

...

A: Salt is incredibly demonized but it isn't demonized justly. We need relatively a high amount of sodium daily and of course, if we have too much, it will get excreted.

...

A: So a consistent intake of sodium is the best way how not to retain water in places you don't want it to be retained (but in the muscle). You need to drink and use salt: that's the best prescription for that.

...

A: Salt is often connected with hypertension but it's nonsense. All of this comes from a single study conducted by a doctor who would prescribe "rice diet" to patients who were experiencing kidney failure but all of those conclusions are rather built on "feelings" rather than real facts and today there is a bit of a renaissance when it comes to using salt. Unfortunately, the inertia in the medical circles of the idea that the salt is dangerous is there still: many doctors telling you "Don't use salt!" since they heard it on their university and they aren't interested about the newest research and the evolution of science. But to limit the intake of sodium - sodium could be a problem for somebody who's experiencing kidney or heart issues but to limit it for a healthy person is absolutely useless and it will prove detrimental in their training.




(as I gave my own recommendation, before you go to train: put a LITTLE bit of salt on a tiny teaspoon, sip onto your tongue, don't taste and drink a half a glass (or a whole glass) of water (as not to feel the taste), the effect is instant! But, please, a LITTLE amount! (Don't be stupid.)
 
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Godmy

A Monkey
One important aspect that my dietitian advised me - introduction of natural "Testosterone boosters" :
garlic, parsley, beans, cinnamon, egg yolks, peepers (all shapes and colours); salt water fish (especially Atlantic mackerel , Cod, Alaska Pollock)
All these foods are beneficial for you and if nothing else will improve your mood, thus your training too! But when it comes to actual help with the testosteron... The general scientific knowledge regarding these thing is that it 1) either doesn't work much 2) it may work, but in other regards than you use it for, thus still being beneficial 3) even if there would be e.g. 10% boost (which is about realistic), that has more or less a zero effect on the major biological processes in the body that are affected most by testosteron (especially muscle building / muscle proteosynthesis). For comparison, an 'enhanced' trainee who injects himself with an artificial testosteron (=anabolic steroids), has even 4000%(!!!!) testosteron boost. And THEN it works... you can see it's quite a jump from no effect to some effect. And I'm talking usual doses.


(Of course, I'm the last person who would have real experience with anabolic steroids: I know too much about biology and health than even considering it, ruining my health & hormone production for good + it's illegal, one would have to first go to a commercial gym, get the right friends and spend unimaginable money for something that may ruin your health or even kill you... not even mentioning I've never been to a fitness gym in my life : D I just like learning, amassing knowledge, even of this kind, that's why I know what I know.)
 
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Godmy

A Monkey
Anyway, considering that a higher body fat percentage elevates estrogen slightly, trying to support the testeron somehow naturally, even if the effects are marginal, is still a good idea @Adrian, even if part of the effect was a placebo*

*placebo [in general] is no joke if it works correctly, because if it does, it can achieve effects with your body you couldn't achieve yourself just with an autosuggestion, that's the beauty of it...
 
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Tironis

Member
My cautionary note on salt intake was meant for Mr/Ms Average who has a sedentary desk job and is not engaged in strenuous physical workouts - think High Blood Pressure!
Aren't high testosterone levels linked to promoting prostate cancer growth?
 

Godmy

A Monkey
What you can take from this is that if you accept moderate amounts of salt, it may still rather benefit you than the opposite unless you are one of the few individuals sensitive to high blood pressure which is a smaller percentage of the population (the body needs sodium for correct function and correct water retention), if you drink water enough.

Cancer? Hmmm, no, that's not the usual problem, there is a plethora of other problems though...
 

Godmy

A Monkey
Update:

- my barbell back squat today: 104% of my bodyweight (67kg)



- the audio didn't get recorded again, but I hope you like my choice from the Youtube classical music ; P The bar looks a bit sloping, but I think it's the weird webcam angle a bit, it felt quite even on my back
- here are the cool socks, of course! : -D
 

Godmy

A Monkey
If you have some updates you would like to share, guys, don't hesitate & post! :)

_________________


Another update from today:
- my barbell bench/chest press is now at 104% of my bodyweight too (67kg)
(which means, for now I have the same number on all 3 big lifts)


(no video today, but there's a shirtless picture after the exercise if you wish :- D)
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Lately, I started doing squats with 40kg barbell (3 sets 6 reps each, 2 minute interlude); and overheadl press with 40 kg barbell (3 sets 6 reps 2 minute interlude ).
 
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