Hoc mihi dās, tamquam dēteriōra legās, ut collāta magis placeant mea?

DylanlyallB

New Member
This sentence is from one of Martial's epigrams which feature in Wheelock's Latin.

My best effort at translation was:

"Do you give this to me (as a favor), as it were you read worse (poetry), so that in comparison mine may better please?"

I can't find another good translation to compare mine to; can anyone tell me if it's correct?

Here is the whole epigram, if you want the context:

Candidius nihil est tē, Caeciliāne. Notāvī:
sī quandō ex nostrīs disticha pauca legō,
prōtinus aut Mārsī recitās aut scrīpta Catullī.
Hoc mihi dās, tamquam dēteriōra legās,
ut collāta magis placeant mea? Crēdimus istud:
mālo tamen recitēs, Caeciliāne, tua!
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
You've certainly got the right idea, but your translation of tamquam is a little more sophisticated than what is needed. A simple 'as if' will do the trick, I think, and if we switch around the clauses it'll maybe sound more natural (but then again, maybe not):

"Do you grant me this so that mine may better please in comparison, as if you were reading worse (couplets/distichs)?"
 
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