I am the master of my fate

A

Anonymous

Guest
All are separate:

I am the master of my fate

I am the captain of my soul

Unconquerable soul

Earth, fire, wind, water




Thank you


Steve
 

Zombye

New Member
Re: Quick Translation of a few words

myth325 dixit:
All are separate:

I am the master of my fate

I am the captain of my soul

Unconquerable soul

Earth, fire, wind, water


Thank you

Steve
Dominus fortunae meae sum,

Capitaneus animae meae sum,

Anima invicta

Humus, ignis, ventus, aqua.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Quick Translation of a few words

For the second one I would use gubernator (someone who leads, steers a ship):

Gubernator sum animae meae.

I think this is what you had in mind, and besides it sounds better in classical Latin.
 

Zombye

New Member
Re: Quick Translation of a few words

mattheus dixit:
For the second one I would use gubernator (someone who leads, steers a ship):

Gubernator sum animae meae.

I think this is what you had in mind, and besides it sounds better in classical Latin.
Sound perfect with me.
 

cosravet

New Member
Re: Quick Translation of a few words

For the second one I would use gubernator (someone who leads, steers a ship):

Gubernator sum animae meae.

I think this is what you had in mind, and besides it sounds better in classical Latin.
Hi, I'm sorry, I know that this thread is from 2008 but there is no reason for me to make a new thread on this, so I have a quick question if you don't mind.

Dominus fortunae meae sum = I am the master of my fortune

So would it correctly be fatum instead of fortunae? Dominus fatum meae sum = I am the master of my fate ?

I'm captivated by this quote, but only in the context of fate specifically over fortune, as I feel that fate has an ecclesiastical meaning to it and regards a will of god, where as fortune would regard luck and prosperity. I am very much so an amateur so please do correct and help me on any of my errors.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
It would have to be dominus fati mei sum.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
...
Dominus fortunae meae sum,

Capitaneus animae meae sum,

Anima invicta

Humus, ignis, ventus, aqua.
Additional remarks:
Dominus fortunae meae sum] correct translation; fortunae more suitable than fati, because there is a well-known saying: Faber est suae quisque fortunae, i.e. Every man is the architect of his fortune (luck, fate).
Capitaneus
] hands off this adjective (!) belonging to the lowest form of latinity! gubernator is correct.
humus ignis ventus aqua] the traditional 4 elements: not humus but terra.

Resumé:
Dominus fortunae meae sum,
Gubernator animae meae sum,
Anima invicta
Terra, ignis, ventus, aqua.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
I'm on a phone, so search is a pain, but aren't there several hundred similar threads on this poem?
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
I tried combining them once.


aer would be more idiomatic than ventus.
 

Agrippa

Civis Illustris
...
aer would be more idiomatic than ventus.
Well, in principle I agree with you, but Anonymous wrote "wind" > "ventus" (i.e. aer motus = air in motion).
 
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