I implore you, grant me the power.

I hope this is considered appropriate. What would be the Latin translation of the following?

I implore you, grant me the power.
 

AoM

nulli numeri
obsecro te, da/tribue/concede mihi potestatem.
 
I am curious what part of the is the direct object, indirect object, and subject so that I know what case to use? I am also wondering what case potestatem is?
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
obsecro te, da/tribue/concede mihi potestatem.
I think da would be most appropriate here.
I am curious what part of the is the direct object, indirect object, and subject so that I know what case to use? I am also wondering what case potestatem is?
  • There is really only one subject, which is implied by obsecro ("I implore"). Da, as an imperative, has no subject.
  • Mihi is the indirect object in this phrase, because it is in the dative case.
  • There are two direct objects: te in obsecro te, and potestatem in da mihi potestatem. The accusative case, which is the case these two words are assuming, is quite frequently used to denote a direct object.
 
I Thank you for the assistance, I have also noticed in Latin syntax that the verb is the last word in a sentence, is this a rule one should always adhere to or is it more of a guideline?
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
While it is true that, on many occasions, the verb is found last in a sentence, it is by no means a rule. The case system allows alterations of word order, so the verb can be almost anywhere and the sentence will still be grammatically correct and make sense.

That said, there are those situations where placing a verb in a certain spot would be stylistically jarring to readers, but in short sentences such as this one, it's not terribly important.
 
I am also curious as to what form of the verb Dare is Da, is that a certain tense of you give?

Thanks, and disregard the last question, I looked it up in my dictionary and figured it out.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Not a tense, a mood. Da is in the imperative (i.e. commanding) mood.

ETA: Seems you've figured it out and I got ninja'd. :p
 
Forgive me for so many questions but as I am trying to teach myself Latin I want to be sure I get it right. I was curious as to what cases one would use if a subject is being described in some way such as
The people bound to the world?
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Forgive me for so many questions but as I am trying to teach myself Latin I want to be sure I get it right.
You have absolutely no reason to be apologizing for that. We're all here to learn, and asking questions is the best way to do it. :)
I was curious as to what cases one would use if a subject is being described in some way such as
The people bound to the world?
Here, you would need what is known as a verbal adjective; it uses the fourth principal part of a verb but is used in the same way as an adjective, meaning that it must agree in case, number, and gender with the noun it modifies.

In this noun clause, "bound", or more literally "having been bound", is a verbal adjective derived from the verb "to bind". One word for "bind" in Latin is ligare, and the dictionary entry for it is: ligo, ligare, ligavi, ligatus. The bolded word, or the fourth principal part, is what's needed here. If you're familiar with adjectives, you'll notice right away that the suffix is the masculine nominative singular. However, "people" is plural, so you'll need the plural form ligati. Now it's just a matter of putting it all together:

Mundo homines ligati - The people having been bound to the world - The people bound to the world.

It seems you have a strong interest in Latin, so I'll direct you to this beginner's guide. All the fundamentals are there, but if you're confused, don't hesitate for a second to make a thread about it. :)
 
Thank you for all the help. The reason I have such a passion for Latin is that I find it to be an interesting language and as an aspiring special effects makeup artist and character creator I find it useful especially since one character I have is a fictional necromancer and I think fictional incantations/spells sound a lot more authentic when said in Latin.

If the dative case for world is mundo, if I changed it to living world would it be mundo vivo?
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
As in "the people bound to the living world"? If so, then yes.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Yes, but there's a small typo: excitati.
 
If potestatem is the correct form for the singular accusative case of potestas, would potestates be the correct plural form of that case?
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Yes.

Also, I think the thread has been slightly derailed, so if you have further small questions unrelated to the original post (the one you just asked was related in a way), please create a new thread in the Latin Beginners subforum so that this thread can retain its continuity. :)
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Isn't it an implied tu, and what has it to do with the verb being an imperative?
Yes; tu is implied, but as it's a minor detail and Darklander is merely in his beginning stages of learning, I figured including that would cause more confusion.

Regarding why I mentioned imperatives at all, Darklander asked what form of dare da is.
 

Laurentius

Man of Culture
Yes; tu is implied, but as it's a minor detail and Darklander is merely in his beginning stages of learning, I figured including that would cause more confusion.
Isn't it more confusing to say that it doesn't have a subject?

Regarding why I mentioned imperatives at all, Darklander asked what form of dare da is.
It is imperative, but it is present too. Also we could add that it is second person singular.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Isn't it more confusing to say that it doesn't have a subject?
I don't think so. I think if I had said that the subject was an implied tu, it might be misinterpreted (i.e. that "implied tu" means das rather than tu das, and tu (nom.) da doesn't make any sense). But then again, das doesn't bear the same force as da (and there's an "s" on the end).
It is imperative, but it is present too. Also we could add that it is second person singular.
I suppose you're right; after all, he did ask for the general form rather than a specific aspect of the verb...
 
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