Love I Love You, I have always loved you, and I will love you for

Long story short, I'm really shy when I'm speaking in English. I think you will understand the situation when you read the phrases to be translated. I have very limited Latin, but I am now providing my attempts at translating the first two phrases. My knowlege of Latin does not permit me to even attempt at translating the rest. Here are the phrases:

1. I Love You, I have always loved you, and I will love you forever.
~Te amo, semper te amabam, semper te amabo~

2. I will be yours forevermore.
~Semper tuus ero~

3. Nothing shall ever outweigh my love for you.

4. God has brought us to together, and none shall tear us apart.
------------------------------------------

5. I am in love with her

6. None shall ever come before her

7. My love for her shall never die.

-------------------------------------------

I hope you are able to help. Thanks in advance!

~Servant of our Lord~
 

Iynx

Consularis
We might make a start with your #4:

God has brought us to together, and none shall tear us apart.

I hear in this an echo of Matthew, XIX: "Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let no man put asunder". (That used to be read in the old Catholic marriage service-- for all I know it may still be).

In the Vulgate the verse is: Itaque jam non sunt duo. sed una caro. Quod ergo Deus conjunxit, homo non separet.

Using the same sort of diction to render your phrase, we might have

Deus conjunxit nos, et homo non separabit.
 
Iynx, I thank you wholeheartedly. I did not intend to echo any Biblical verses in these phrases, but knowing that it does so makes it far more profound in my situation. Thank you.

~Servus Nostri Domini~
 

Iynx

Consularis
1. I Love You, I have always loved you, and I will love you forever.
~Te amo, semper te amabam, semper te amabo~

I think your Latin is fine here. We might perhaps polish it a bit. It might be rhetorically effective to omit the repeated te:

Te amo, semper amabam, et semper amabo.


2. I will be yours forevermore.
~Semper tuus ero~

I think you want tibi here, not tuus.
 

Iynx

Consularis
Nothing shall ever outweigh my love for you.

Perhaps:

Nihil umquam meum amorem erga te praeponderabit.

I dunno. That carries the sense, I think, but it seems a little clumsy. Maybe someone else has a better idea?
 

Iynx

Consularis
"I am in love with her"

Well "I have fallen in love with her" is certainly:

In amorem eius incidi

It is tempting to translate your phrase as In amore eius sum, but I don't know that such a rendering has ever been idiomatic Latin. Can someone else help us here?
 

Cato

Consularis
Iynx dixit:
"I am in love with her"
Well "I have fallen in love with her" is certainly:

In amorem eius incidi
This is why I visit this forum. I would have thought this was bad Latin, but I have found a classical reference that uses this idiom in exactly way: Seneca the Elder's Controversiae 3.7: In amorem filiae istius incidi. So I learned something.

It is tempting to translate your phrase as In amore eius sum, but I don't know that such a rendering has ever been idiomatic Latin. Can someone else help us here?
I found one similar reference: Terence Eunuchus l.59 has in amore haec omnia insunt vitia. However, I've read a lot of Latin elegy and can't recall coming across a usage like sum in amore. I know it's tough to prove a negative like this (not to mention my instincts were wrong in the case of in amorem incidi), but there it is.
 

Iynx

Consularis
I was interested in you citation from Terrence, chjones, thinking that it might give us an idiomatic way of saying, in Latin, "to be in love" (with someone).

But look at the phrase in its wider context:

in amore haec omnia insunt vitia: iniuriae,
suspiciones, inimicitiae, indutiae,
bellum, pax rursum...


And you will see that it is, unfortunately, nothing of the sort. I read this as

in love there are all these evils: injuries,
suspicions, enmities, armistices,
war, and then peace again...

It is, as I say, very tempting to render the English idiom in amore sum, or in amore insum-- after all if one call fall in love why can't one be in love? But we still lack an authoritative example, classical or otherwise, of any such usage in Latin.
 
Top