I love you with all my heart

cyllanmartini

New Member
Te amo ex animo=I love you with all my heart or no ?
If so, how would you say that? What exactly does te amo ex animo mean?
 
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LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
it is correct:

ex profundo cordis te amo
// from the bottom of my heart...
ex toto animo te amo
//with all my heart...
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Literally it's "I love you from the heart".

Te = you
amo = I love
ex = from
animo = heart/(emotional) mind/spirit

There are several ways you can say "I love you with all (my) heart": toto corde te amo, omni corde te amo, omni pectore te amo, toto pectore te amo...
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
ab imo pectore was idiomatic....more later.
 

cyllanmartini

New Member
ok, thanks for all the help everyone. I actually study Italian and Spanish ( I am a fiend for romance languages :)). I need the translation for a tattoo. Out of all of the answers, I like best the way "omni corde te amo" sounds. If anyone else has any more contributions, suggestions, explanations, pleaseeeee let me know. I am not in a rush. Thanks again !
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Tum vero ingentem gemitum dat pectore ab imo, = "Then indeed from the bottom of his heart he heaves a deep groan" (Vergil, Aeneid, I. 485) appears to mean just "with a full voice," rather than "deeply sincere."
But we also have funditque preces rex pectore ab imo (VI. 55) = "their king pours forth prayers from his inmost heart."
Also: diliges Dominum Deum tuum ex toto corde tuo et in tota anima tua et in tota mente tua = "thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and in all thy soul and in all thy mind" (Matt 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 10:27)
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
ok, thanks for all the help everyone. I actually study Italian and Spanish ( I am a fiend for romance languages :)). I need the translation for a tattoo. Out of all of the answers, I like best the way "omni corde te amo" sounds. If anyone else has any more contributions, suggestions, explanations, pleaseeeee let me know. I am not in a rush. Thanks again !
My dear friend, please bear in mind that "omni corde aliquem amare" is incorrect as cor denotes cordial muscle, not figurative expression corresponding to "heart" as emotional element of human existence.
Meissner dixit:
97. Heart
cor (physical) ;
fig. animus, except in the expression mihi cordi est ; (note also the early use of cor for mind : ''Q. Ennius tria corda habere sese dicebat, quod loqui graece et osce et latino sciret." Gell. 17, 17, 1, cf. Cic. Tusc. 1, 9, 18).
demittere aliquid in pectus ; in pectus animumque suum - to take a thing to heart.
alicuius animum commovere—to touch a person's heart, move him.
aegritudo exest animum planeque conficit (Tusc. 3. 13. 27) —anxiety gnaws at the heart and incapacitates it.
aliquem toto pectore(1) ut dicitur amare (Leg. 18. 49)—to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart.
(1) pectus metaphorically only occurs in isolated phrases, e.g. toto pectore, cogitare, tremere. Its commonest substitute is animus. Similarly cor metaphorically is only used in the phrase "cordi est".
aliquem toto pectore ut dicitur amare (Leg. 18. 49)—to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart

Te toto pectore amo = I love you with all my heart
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
My dear friend, please bear in mind that "omni corde aliquem amare" is incorrect as cor denotes cordial muscle, not figurative expression corresponding to "heart" as emotional element of human existence.
That's wrong. Definition 5 of cor in the OLD: (as the seat of character or emotion) The heart, spirit, feelings, etc.

Ex: videas corde amare inter se - nomen amicitiae barbara corda movet - ponuntque ferocia Poeni corda - arrectae mentes stupefactaque corda Iliadum - cura ex corde excessit...

Also look at Scrabulista's quotes.
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
That's wrong. Definition 5 of cor in the OLD: (as the seat of character or emotion) The heart, spirit, feelings, etc.

Ex: videas corde amare inter se - nomen amicitiae barbara corda movet - ponuntque ferocia Poeni corda - arrectae mentes stupefactaque corda Iliadum - cura ex corde excessit...

Also look at Scrabulista's quotes.
Interesting.....

Before posting, I checked my other dictionaries and failed to find "cor" being used in classical latin in regard to "love someone with all his/her heart; love someone very dearly " (And I can assure you I have a lot of dictionaries of latin language).
I checked my other resources concerning latin syntax, writing styles of classical authors, and prose composition, and failed to find "cor" being used in classical latin in regard to "love someone with all his/her heart; love someone very dearly "
I skyped a PhD of classical philology and he was very surprised with using "cor" in composition "to love someone with all his/her heart" in regard to classical latin and latin prose composition.

Most interesting... indeed.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Well, I didn't invent what I wrote in my last post, I just got it from the OLD. Especially that videas corde amare inter se is "most interesting indeed" as you say. And Scrabulista's examples, even if they might not be classical Latin, show at least that at some point cor was used in that sense. Now it's possible that pectus was more common.

My Latin-French dic also has this definition of cor: coeur (siège du sentiment) - heart, seat of the feeling - corde amare ou corde atque animo suo.

In the Forcellini as well: item pro sede affectuum.

It's very interesting indeed, Adrian, that none of your so many dictionaries has this definition, while all three mine do. ;)
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Well, I didn't invent what I wrote in my last post, I just got it from the OLD. Especially that videas corde amare inter se is "most interesting indeed" as you say.
I have just read the section from Charles E. Bennett, Syntax of Early Latin. I'm afraigt that Mr Plautus used this expression in a bit slightly different context of "heart"...


Cicero, Terence, Livy, Seneca, Pliny the Younger and Plautus (whose excert you provided form OLD) used pectus and animus with preference to animus.
I am reading Anton.... It appears that expression "heart" should be dealt with extreme caution and dilligence as "with all ones heart" undestood in several contexts (based on Cicero, Livy , Pliny, Plautus and Terence) varies much; the distincion when to apply "ex animo" and " toto animo/ pectore" alone in a prose composition; in some cases a verb alone without pectus or animus is required to convey semantical meaning of expression "heart". Unfortunately there is no "cor" appearing in them.

It's very interesting indeed, Adrian, that none of your so many dictionaries has this definition, while all three mine do. ;)
Mine also have it, but provide additional context in which "cor" was used...
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Both "cor" and "pectus" can be used for that meaning.

LCF has said:
"ex profundo cordis te amo" <- that is abl+gen we need abl+abl profundo corde...

(but I'm not really watching the discussion)
Godmy,
as far as I recall "animus" and "pectus" are classical (and attested - Cicero, Plautus and Terence), whileas "cor" in reference to figurative expression of heart/soul is found mostly in medieval, sacral, ecclesiastical latin texts (Bible, Saint Thomas, Sain Augustine, Epistula Sancti Francisci Assiniensis, etc.) ... e.g.:
omnes homines boni in corde Dei sunt; O Maria, Regina Nostra, tu semper in cordibus nostris eris; [...] Spero in te, amo te super omnia ex tota anima mea, ex toto corde meo, ex totis viribus meis [...]).
IMO toto animo/ pectore te amo is safe and preferable in relation to "I love you with all my heart"
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
There are even plenty of classical or preclassical examples for "cor as a seat of emotion" (which you can look up yourself in big dicts.) + the phrase cordi esse which is quite clear about it, therefore you can use both ;)

So we can aswell use "toto corde te amo"
mostly preclassical and used in praticular in poetry (E. Bennett, Syntax of Early Latin);)
 

Godmy

A Monkey
mostly preclassical and used in praticular in poetry (E. Bennett, Syntax of Early Latin);)
Which still makes what you said before not true ;) And as there are even classical examples I wouldn't protest to use it as a working alternative for pectore ;)

Edit: But to tell you more so you don't think that I don't care about your arguments Adrian, my arguments are these:

0) if the preclassical examples in the plays don't count:

1) one Ciceronian example "corde capessere" (which would even suffice)
2) plenty of prose and poetry examples of "cordi esse" which is also a kind of argument
3) many examples (as you said) in the poetry: I would expect this phrase to be found rather in poetry, in fact, than the less emotional prose and that's what usually you want to have as a tattoo for your loved one. (Poetry > Prose)

4) I don't really care if you pick corde, pectore or animo... I was just pointing out that it was not wrong
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
Both "cor" and "pectus" can be used for that meaning.

LCF has said:
"ex profundo cordis te amo" <- that is abl+gen we need abl+abl profundo corde...

(but I'm not really watching the discussion)
I actually meant the genitive here :)

"ex profundo cordis"
// lit : from depth (of heart)/ from (heart's) depth. Not from heart, but from the depth of heart. If I put it in ablative it sounds too poetic to my liking :) "from heart deep" "ex corde profundo".


(but I'm not really watching the discussion either)
 

Godmy

A Monkey
I actually meant the genitive here :)

"ex profundo cordis"
// lit : from depth (of heart)/ from (heart's) depth. Not from heart, but from the depth of heart. If I put it in ablative it sounds too poetic to my liking :) "from heart deep" "ex corde profundo".


(but I'm not really watching the discussion either)
<- Sorry, I didn't consider that.
In Latin we really usually say litteraly "from the deep heart" meaning "from the deep part of the heart" rather than "profunda parte cordis" or "profundo cordis" (as in "medio oppido") but you are right of course that it is grammatically correct and possible :)
 
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Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
that could also be done ex imo corde
 
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