I survive because the fire inside me burns brighter than the fire around me

'I survive because the fire inside me burns brighter than the fire around me.'

It is for a new artwork of mine :) the fire is obviously metaphorical. Thanks as always.
So first and foremost Latin to English translations and vice versa are very complicated. Most of the time certain quotes/phrases can't be directly translated without some form of variation to the quote/phrase. I had trouble trying to directly translate the quote you wanted translated into Latin, but i found a variation that works perfectly. "I am a survivor, because the fire inside me is burning brighter than those around me". Translated is " Superstes sum est, quod intra ignis qui intra me, clarius ardet qui circa est me." I know that I'm a couple years late but i hope this helps.
 
Ok, you tell me what the correct translation for that phrase would be. I double and triple checked my translation. I also input the phrase into google translate to see if it translated to English the way i intended it to and it came out as i thought it would, which is exactly how i typed it.
 
The options Dantius offered seem correct to me.

Regarding machine translations:
http://latindiscussion.com/forum/latin/do-not-post-google-translate-or-any-other-machine-translation.5579/
OK. i didn't use google translate to get a translation i used my english latin dictionary. I used google translate only as a last rsort check to see if it would translate correctly seeing how i had already tripled checked with my dictionary and a couple other books from my school days. also i noticed my typing mistake. i meant Supersum me est, quod intra ignis qui intra me, clarius ardet qui circa est me. Dantius is right but wrong. Supero means " to be above, have the upper hand, surpass" not to survive.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
OK. i didn't use google translate to get a translation i used my english latin dictionary. I used google translate only as a last rsort check to see if it would translate correctly seeing how i had already tripled checked with my dictionary and a couple other books from my school days. also i noticed my typing mistake. i meant Supersum me est, quod intra ignis qui intra me, clarius ardet qui circa est me. Dantius is right but wrong. Supero means " to be above, have the upper hand, surpass" not to survive.

Supero can mean "I survive". And as said, your new translation isn't really a good translation.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
OK. i didn't use google translate to get a translation i used my english latin dictionary. I used google translate only as a last rsort check to see if it would translate correctly seeing how i had already tripled checked with my dictionary and a couple other books from my school days. also i noticed my typing mistake. i meant Supersum me est, quod intra ignis qui intra me, clarius ardet qui circa est me. Dantius is right but wrong. Supero means " to be above, have the upper hand, surpass" not to survive.
"me" at the beginning is accusative for no reason. You have two verbs in the beginning, supersum and est, one of which is third person. "Intra" is repeated. The first relative clause lacks a verb. You're missing a "quam" for "than". There's no reason to put est between circa and me.
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
theoryofprophet: the problem is that with zero knowlege of the Latin grammar, doublechecking, triplechecking, quadruplechecking with a dictionary will not help, because 1) you don't know the correct endings for the words (only a Latin grammar book can reveal that to an unexperienced person) 2) you don't know the correct word order 3) you don't know the correct phrases 4) Google translate cannot be used even as a last resort, because it produces gibberish: you obviously understand that a gibberish generator cannot be used as a last resort. It's like drinking sea water to quench the thirst.

So you can imagine how wrong your statement may sound to an experienced Latinist. Don't take it personally though, it's good you put in the efforts, but there is just no help if you've never opened a Latin grammar book.

Google Translate for Latin should be banned, forbidden, nuked from the Internet.
 
"me" at the beginning is accusative for no reason. You have two verbs in the beginning, supersum and est, one of which is third person. "Intra" is repeated. The first relative clause lacks a verb. You're missing a "quam" for "than". There's no reason to put est between circa and me.
You put “est” between “circa” and “me” as well there buddy. Seeing how I agreed with you on that part cause the translation seemed correct. So I didn’t bother changing it. Also now that I’ve slept and I’m not tired I see my mistakes. It was 5 am when I was trying to translate this and I had worked all night. I’ll glance through my books again and try for a better translation. So I came up with this. “Ego supersum quod, ignis intra me, clarius ardet quam ignis circa me. So is this a better translation. I survive because the fire within me burns brighter than the fire around me.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
You put “est” between “circa” and “me” as well there buddy.
Um, that's just not true, you can look at my original post and verify that...
"Supero quod ignis qui intra me est/ignis internus clarius ardet quam qui circa me est."

“Ego supersum quod, ignis intra me, clarius ardet quam ignis circa me. So is this a better translation.
That is indeed a better translation. However, as I mentioned in my original post, Latin doesn't tend to use prepositional phrases adjectivally like that; they'd be more likely to use a relative clause or something similar which is why I did so in my original translation. Also, the ego is rather unnecessary here. Now I'm not saying that this translation is grammatically incorrect in any way, it's just that I'm still not entirely sure why you revived a super old thread that had already been answered...

As for whether supero can mean "to survive", something that came up earlier, the answer is yes, it can:
Screen Shot 2019-09-08 at 5.57.12 PM.png
 
I found this quote elsewhere and I liked it. I plan on getting another tatt and I want this quote in Latin around the tatt I’m getting. So I started to try and translate the quote to Latin and that’s how I found this site and this thread. I don’t want the translation to be wrong, Also i want the translation to be as close to the original quote that Latin translation will allow.
 
As for whether supero can mean "to survive", something that came up earlier, the answer is yes, it can:
View attachment 8093[/quote]
Ok I’ll take your word for it but it’s not in the dictionary I have or in any of the dictionaries I’ve looked through online.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Ok I’ll take your word for it but it’s not in the dictionary I have or in any of the dictionaries I’ve looked through online.
"my word for it" was the Lewis and Short dictionary, that's like the standard source for looking up words if you want the details/nuances. You could also see 17 different classical citations in the entry I posted so you don't have to just take my word for it...
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illūstris
When I was a beginner Latinist, I wasn't comparatively 'bad', but in retrospective, my journey much followed this curve http://dunning.linguax.com (give it a look if you haven't heard about it...)

For example, today if I had that [subjectively] crazy idea to tattoo a Latin phrase onto my skin, I wouldn't on 99% use my own translated phrase (or any other neo-latin) but some classical quote, probably from Horace, since it often happens I translate something, give it some work, I like it, but one year later I think I could still do it better (and one can't revise a tattoo). That's how the 'confidence' levels change with experience, with years.
 
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