I will XXXXing make them pay for what they had done.

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
Hi all,

This is a very angry sentence. The character said it with emotions, and the XXXX is a vulgarity. In English, it is the F word... (it wasn't censored, the censored it myself)

I was wondering if there is any crude word in Latin as well? =D

Thanks in advance!

"I will XXXXing make them pay for what they had done."
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
That is interesting!

I like the word futxxxx

Can someone help me to translate the "I will XXXing make them pay for what they had done" , using the crude language as mentioned? If it's censored, I can PM you for the exact translation =)

Thanks!
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Does the linked article really help? I can't find any uses as vulgar intensifiers...

I don't think that we censor our Latin, so you don't need to worry about that.
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
The rules we had discussed (this is not final and Nikolaos if these particular rules do not apply please point that out) were that vulgarities had to appear in context, in actual Latin literature (which could be problematic for Low Kay Hwa -- as you point out, they were not used as intensifiers, at least not in formal writing). LKH's other out would be they would have to carry a certain amount of wit.

LKH, this approach might or might not appeal to you:

et nunc ille Paris cum semiuiro comitatu, - Vergil, Aeneid, IV. 215
"And now that Paris with his semivirile company,"
This line is uttered by King Iarbas, referring to Aeneas. Aeneas isn't literally Paris, nor is Dido Helen, but Iarbas sees him as the guy who's stealing his girl.

You could say "I will make (those X's) pay for what they had done." Maybe tell us some background and someone can offer a disparaging classical reference. Then again, this approach might not satisfy you.
 

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
Hi,

I'm sorry, I'm pretty confused. The "XXXXing" in the sentence is an adverb modifying the entire verb phrase "make them pay for what they had done". I do understand that it might be slightly complicated to translate as the syntactic functions / forms is different in Latin.

This is an angry phrase from an angry character. Just like how a furious man would say things like "I'll bloody make you pay for your doings!"; the idea is akin to that.

In the story, the character is talking to his parents' graves. He claimed that he will make sure that those fellows who killed his parents will pay for their wrongdoings.

I'm fine with any translation that portrays anger with the same meaning. As long as the idea of the speech is there (modified with anger), it will be fine! Anyway, this is a sentence that will not be translated back to English in the story, as translation in the story will give the epiphany of the story away...
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
Hmmm, this might have to be left for the experts. I don't know of any such intensifiers yet, but there have to be some out there.
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I would have thought that the classical way of intensifying such an oath would be something like per Iovem, or mehercule

If you look at the Mediaeval period, although he uses such words as swyve, for intensifiers Chaucer uses blasphemy as crude intensifiers, eg for Goddes bones, by Goddes precious herte, and by his nayles, for Christes sweete tree. I seem to recall William I being reported as swearing in similar fashion.

Even in relatively modern literature such cursing as I can recall had religious references, sure as hell, damned well etc.

I am not sure when this trend for using the f word started, but it must have been quite recent.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Cinefactus dixit:
I would have thought that the classical way of intensifying such an oath would be something like per Iovem, or mehercule
That's absolutely right and probably the best way of rendering it. The rest of the sentence may have come up as a request before. Something like "Hercle! faciam ut poenas dent pro suis factis"
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Low Kay Hwa,

What is the reason the character speaks in Latin? Did he/she attend an exclusive private school? Catholic? Secular?
 

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
I'm sorry, I don't quite get it. Is "Hercle! faciam ut poenas dent pro suis factis" okay? I would just need a sentence that portrays anger.


scrabulista:

He went overseas to study and fall in love with the language. However, as a writer, the main reason why I chose Latin is because not many readers in my country understand Latin. It creates a subtle effect. The Latin sentences, should they understand, will give away the main spoiler of the story...


Any idea? It doesn't necessary has to translate the English words. Just an idea will do ~ =)
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
I was thinking if the character had attended a Catholic school, he or she might have qualms about appealing to pagan deities/demigods. The drawback here is that they probably don't teach Latin cursing in parochial school. I can see such a character making a reference to Orestes or Electra though.

If it were a secular private school, the character might be expected to appeal to pagan deities.
 

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
Ha... The character is pretty much crazy. He's not exactly a religious person but he is a fan of Greek Mythology. I read the part about Electra (I have no idea who is Orestes or Electra, but thanks to Google, I know now! HAHA!) and it is pretty relevant to what the character is doing: Social engineering to benefit him.

However, for this part, I guess I will just need a basic translation of him saying things like "I will make them pay for what they had done", intensifying or modifying with any adjectives / adverbs. I know nuts about Latin even after reading so many stuff here!

Anyway can provide that translation? =D
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Low Kay Hwa dixit:
Anyway can provide that translation? =D
you have already been provided with a very good suggestion by Bitmap
 

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
so "Hercle! faciam ut poenas dent pro suis factis" , loosely translated, is something like "I will make them pay for what they have done?" Do I need to add in any words?

Just to confirm as I don't want to get it wrong! =D
 

Low Kay Hwa

New Member
Yo all! I'm sorry, I haven't got any updates with regards to my query and therefore is wondering if anyone would be kind to assist in this question, as my deadline is around the corner? =D

I would just need to confirm if "Hercle! faciam ut poenas dent pro suis factis", , if loosely translated, is something like "I will make them pay for what they have done?"

Thanks in advance again! =)
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Hercle! is an appeal to Hercules. "By Jove!" doesn't have quite the sting of a modern-day swear word, and I don't think "By Hercules!" was ever a common part of the English vocabulary.

faciam ut poenas dent pro suis factis - "I will make that they give penalties for their deeds."

You might want to look up Hercules' 12 labors. In some versions of the myth, the labors are assigned as penance for Hercules killing his children. Possibly your character has feelings of guilt as well as revenge...
 

Imprecator

Civis Illustris
scrabulista dixit:
"I will make that they give penalties for their deeds."
"I will make it [so that] they [pay] penalties for their [mis]deeds" would probably make more sense to an English speaker.
 

Decimus Canus

Civis Illustris
Imprecator dixit:
scrabulista dixit:
"I will make that they give penalties for their deeds."
"I will make it [so that] they give penalties for their [mis]deeds" would probably make more sense to an English speaker.
Possibly it could be strengthened by substituting sceleribus or facinoribus for factis?
 
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