idcirco fuerant ea tempestate multi

neilgd

Member
Hi,

I'm trying to translate the following (it's about the Papal schism):

idcirco fuerant ea tempestate multi, qui sibi constituerunt animo tractare, ut Ecclesiam ad unionem reducerent.

My best effort is:

Therefore many by (because of?) that storm had been, who had set up in mind to discuss with themselves, that they might restore the Church to unity.

Unfortunately this is gibberish. I'd really appreciate some direction - thanks!
 

Aurifex

Aedilis
Staff member
"For this reason there had been many at this time who resolved to apply their mind to the reunification of the Church", or maybe "who resolved to apply their mind to how the Church might be reunified."
 

neilgd

Member
Thank you! A couple of questions though:

What does 'ea tempestate' mean here, and is the second clause then parsed as '(qui constituerunt) (sibi) (tractare animo)'?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
am wondering why the author used ea tempestate to mean "at that time"; the first thing this brings to mind is a "storm".
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
am wondering why the author used ea tempestate to mean "at that time"; the first thing this brings to mind is a "storm".
The word is polysemic. Here it clearly refers to a period of time.
Therefore by (virtue of) that ſtorm there had been many, who with courage had ſet themſelves to ſtrive, that they might lead the church back to unity.
Why do you do this? A perfectly good translation has already been provided by Aurifex.
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
am wondering why the author used ea tempestate to mean "at that time"; the first thing this brings to mind is a "storm".
ea tempestate vs eo tempore/illis temporibus have nuance in usage as far as I remember. Think of ea tempestate as if in that season, in that period of time/season, it's a matter of later dialect. Imagine flowers blooming, fields yielding crops etc... When Rome had a rise of poets, ea tempestate, blah blah blah... While eo tempore is just a general: at that time. That's how I learned the difference between the two usages.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
ea tempestate vs eo tempore/illis temporibus have nuance in usage as far as I remember. Think of ea tempestate as if in that season, in that period of time/season, it's a matter of later dialect. Imagine flowers blooming, fields yielding crops etc... When Rome had a rise of poets, ea tempestate, blah blah blah... While eo tempore is just a general: at that time. That's how I learned the difference between the two usages.
Ea tempestate generally means merely "at that time", it doesn't have to mean"in that season (witnter, spring...)", though it can too.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
The English word 'season' can mean any period of time as well, not just one of the four seasons.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ah, I didn't know. But as he was talking of flowers blooming, maybe he meant season as in the four seasons.
 
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