Ideas for memes (Whatsapp Roman stickers)

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
Havete, all!

I found an app to make stickers, so, I'm beginning to make stickers in Latin, with Roman themes. I need ideas though.

Until now, I made these:

"mitte Samothraciam" (with an image of the Victory of Samothrace)
"noli iacere..." (Roman dice)
"lupus in fabula" (mosaic of a wolf)
"lupa (valde iucunda) in fabula" (funny mosaic of the twins shewolf)

What memes do you recommend me?

Also, I'll try to share them here... (Though I only managed to save them as '.webp', and I couldn't attach them here... Does anyone know what I need to do?)
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
I'm thinking about sentences for emperors, too... What memes with the main emperors (and what emperors) would you suggest?

I'm thinking something like these, though I don't yet have the sentenses:

Augustus
Nero
Vespasianus (or Domitianus)
Hadrianus
Marcus
Antoninus (the Caracalla one, because you have to use that face!)
Diocletianus
Constantinus
Iulianus
Iustinianus
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
How would you say "this is not how I imagined this day was going to end" in Latin?

hoc modo [this day was going to end] non putavi
[ut hic dies finiverit/finitus esset, fuisset] (Is it ok to say it this way? Is there a more idiomatic way to say it?)
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You can use that basis and write hoc modo diem finiri non putavi.
You'd normally need the future there: Hoc modo diem finitum iri non putabam or Non putabam futurum (esse)/fore ut hoc modo dies finiretur.

(The imperfect also seems slightly more likely than the perfect in the main verb.)

Now, you could also have something like Finem huic diei talem futurum non putabam.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I'm thinking about sentences for emperors, too... What memes with the main emperors (and what emperors) would you suggest?

I'm thinking something like these, though I don't yet have the sentenses:

Augustus
Nero
Vespasianus (or Domitianus)
Hadrianus
Marcus
Antoninus (the Caracalla one, because you have to use that face!)
Diocletianus
Constantinus
Iulianus
Iustinianus
You could possibly use some sayings famoulsy attributed to them. I can think of two:

Nero: Qualis artifex pereo!
Vespasianus: Vae, puto, deus fio!

Both phrases are said to have been their last (or last-ish) words.

For Constantine, you could perhaps adapt the famous in hoc signo vinces in some way.

Though Claudius isn't on your list, his alleged Vae me, puto, concacavi might be worth considering...
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
You'd normally need the future there:
I know, but those bulky expressions seemed a bit overblown to me for a meme (and I wouldn't put it past a Roman not to adhere to Cicero's super-precise style in a casual statement :>). I briefly considered adding posse behind finiri, but then I thought that would require too much explanation, too :p
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I've seen the present infinitive used instead of the future one in medieval Latin. Not sure I've ever seen it in classical Latin, but well, yeah, I guess it's likely that some careless Romans made the mistake.
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
You'd normally need the future there: Hoc modo diem finitum iri non putabam or Non putabam futurum (esse)/fore ut hoc modo dies finiretur.

(The imperfect also seems slightly more likely than the perfect in the main verb.)

Now, you could also have something like Finem huic diei talem futurum non putabam.
Which one do you think would be the most Roman?...

--

(Deleting meme with wrong syntax.)
 
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meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
You could possibly use some sayings famoulsy attributed to them. I can think of two:

Nero: Qualis artifex pereo!
Vespasianus: Vae, puto, deus fio!

Both phrases are said to have been their last (or last-ish) words.

For Constantine, you could perhaps adapt the famous in hoc signo vinces in some way.

Though Claudius isn't on your list, his alleged Vae me, puto, concacavi might be worth considering...
Lol! I'l do every one I find something to do with!
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
How would you say "stay calm and learn Latin"?

I though "placidus/placida mane et Latinum disce", though I have a doubt about wether I should put the adjective in the vocative case (placide? does it make any sense?)...
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
I knew there was something wrong! huic *diei! Sorry. :shifty: Correction will be made.

--

(I'll edit here to add the image, so as not to keep adding messages.)
 

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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Which one do you think would be the most Roman?...
It's hard to tell for sure, but personally I like the version with finem.
How would you say "stay calm and learn Latin"?

I though "placidus/placida mane et Latinum disce", though I have a doubt about wether I should put the adjective in the vocative case (placide? does it make any sense?)...
"Latin" is usually lingua Latina or sermo Latinus. Latinum is found alone pretty much only in the phrases in Latinum ("into Latin") or ex Latino ("from Latin").

I don't think placidus is the right sort of "calm". Tranquillus might work better but even then I'm not entirely sure tranquillus mane would be the most idiomatic phrase ever. Maybe something like aequo es animo would be better, or possibly aequo mane animo if the idea of "staying" is really important.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't think placidus is the right sort of "calm". Tranquillus might work better but even then I'm not entirely sure tranquillus mane would be the most idiomatic phrase ever. Maybe something like aequo es animo would be better, or possibly aequo mane animo if the idea of "staying" is really important.
Looking at the aequus OLD entry I've found something that would work perfectly: aequam serva mentem — Horace has aequam memento rebus in arduis servare mentem.
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
Looking at the aequus OLD entry I've found something that would work perfectly: aequam serva mentem — Horace has aequam memento rebus in arduis servare mentem.
Wow! Thank you!!!

And I thought I couldn't get that one wrong... :eek-2: But that's exactly what I'm looking for: the best (Roman) way to say whatever the meme is. To me, it's a challenge in learning idioms.

So, aequam serva mentem et Latinum disce would be it, I believe. (There's no better way to say Latinum disce, right? lol)
 
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