Idioms

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ventrem ferre: to bear a belly = to be pregnant.

Livy, Ab urbe condita, 1.34.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
viris equisque ---> "with horse and foot", "with might and main"

Cic. de Off. III.116
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
aqua haeret ---> "the water stops", or "I am at a loss"

Cic. Off. III.117
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I already posted that last one.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Well, I don't remember that. Some people may not either.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
De capsula = "out of a small box" = excessively neat, "out of a bandbox".

Seneca, letter CXV ad Lucilium (book 19).
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't know. Via can have a figurative meaning as well, so it would certainly have made sense and looks like something possible to say, but I've personally never seen the expression as such.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Vix unus aut alter = "hardly one or another/a second one" = hardly anyone, very rare people.

Discovered in Pliny the Younger.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
De summo pectore = "from the top of the heart" = "without much reflection"

Found in Gellius, XVII, 13.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Not really a classical Latin idiom (rather Christian), but:

Viam universae carnis ingredi = to walk the way of all flesh = to die.
 

AoM

nulli numeri
I guess this is an idiom?

dare locum = to make way for / to give way

Aeneid (II.633): dant tela locum
 

Araneus

Umbraticus Lector
Ut qui maxime = more than anyone (?)

I don't know if it's an actual idiom, but I found it to be a strange formulation anyhow.

Found it in Tacitus' Germania ch. 10:
Auspicia sortesque ut qui maxime observant - Augury and divinations they heed more than anyone
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
No, it's just literally "as (those) who (do so) most".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes.
 

Araneus

Umbraticus Lector
Bah. So it's just auspicia sortesque, ut qui maxime (observant), observant.
Ah... quite simple. I didn't think of that. Typical Tacitean construction as well, letting one verb appear in one clause and be implicitly repeated in others.

And without the punctuation, you can't know which clause it's supposed to belong to, but then it doesn't matter because it belongs to both...

Thanks for clearing it up!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You can usually tell from the structure which clause it belongs to. Here it belongs to the main clause.
 
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