Idioms

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Bene vasatus = well-equipped, i.e. mentulatus.

Read in the Historia Augusta.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Munditias facere = "to make cleannesses", i.e. "to clean or tidy up"

Just stumbled upon this fortuitously in the dictionary, but it occurs in Plautus and Cato.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
manum inicere: 2. In a jurid. sense, to seize, take possession of, as one's property, without a previous judicial decision (which was permitted, e. g. to a master on meeting with his runaway slave; v. injectio)

Found this in that 12 tables sentence "si calvitur pedemve struit, manum endo iacito"
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Fumum/fumos vendere = "to sell smoke(s)", i.e. "to make empty promises"
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Omnia summa facere = "to do all utmost things" = "to do one's utmost".

Just chanced upon it in the dictionary; it occurs in Lucilius and Cicero.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Fumum/fumos vendere = "to sell smoke(s)", i.e. "to make empty promises"
Funny, I just saw this in the Iudicium Coci et Pistoris Iudice Vulcano.

Anyway, here's something from the dictionary:
D. Prov.: arcem facere e cloacā, to make a mountain of a mole-hill Cic. Planc. 40.—
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
sunt enim Aegyptii, ut satis nosti, <in>venti ventosi, furibundi, iactantes, iniuriosi atque adeo vani, liberi, novarum rerum usque ad cantilenas publicas cupientes, versificatores, epigrammatarii, mathematici, haruspices, medici.

(Historia Augusta)

I am not sure, but my first interpretation of the above was "to such a point that public songs are made about it", i.e. "famously", "proverbially", or so. I found nothing to either confirm or disprove this.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Another one I found in the dictionary:
Prov.: verba facit emortuo, he talks to the dead, i. e. in vain, Plaut. Poen. 4, 2, 18.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Cornua vertere in aliquem, "to turn the horns against someone", "to turn against someone". In the context where I read it, the subject was a thing:

Superest ea pars epistulae, quae similiter pro me scripta in memet ipsum uertit cornua; Apuleius talking about a letter the content of which was distorted by his accusers.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Manum non vertere: "not to turn a hand", that is, "not to do anything, not to make the slightest effort", but also, in the Apuleius passage where I read it, "not to care" (with an indirect question): Sed ego, quid de me Mezentius sentiat, manum non uorterim.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
I don't know if this has been posted already, but nihil moror (aliquam rem): I don't care about (something). It's from the judicial phrase nihil morari aliquem meaning "to dismiss (someone)". nihil moror can also take an acc+inf or just an infinitive.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Here's some idioms I found in the dictionary:
clavo clavum eicere, to drive out one nail by another

aliquid trabali clavo figere, to fasten with a large nail, to clinch a matter
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
I am sure someone must have posted this. coleos habere: to have balls
Sat 44
 

AoM

nulli numeri
Achilleid, 1.425

ereptum superis Mars efferat aurum

To turn into weapons, apparently.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It's an interesting and very nice expression, but I suspect it's an original poetic phrasing rather than an idiom.
 

AoM

nulli numeri
Oh, that's true.
 
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