in modica

asulavik

New Member
I have transcribed a sentence from a 13th century manuscript, and am having difficulty understanding how "in modica" operates in the sentence.
Here is the full sentence:

Modo est tempus mercandi paradisum, et post mortem tanta erit penuria quod in modica poterit homo bene operari.

Translated as:
Now is the time to purchase paradise, even after death (a man's) penury will be so great that he could do good works in modica??
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris
Maybe it still refers to penuria, making a comparison with the previous sentence. Are you sure about that "even"? "Et" here looks like a normal conjunction to me.
 

asulavik

New Member
If it does, should the sentence now read:
Now is the time to purchase paradise, and after death (a man's) penury will be so great that in (that) small (penury) he could do good works.
 

Laurentius

Civis Illustris
I was thinking like "...that in a small (penury) he could do good works", meaning that a small amount (of time in life?) is still better than no time at all (after death?). But really, I am not sure.
 
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