in situ parentis

Causas

New Member

Would it be reasonable to use this phrase when referring to a parent with whom a child lives? (as opposed to an estranged parent).

I've merely conflated the 2 terms: in situ & in loco parentis, of course. But it's been a very long time since I've done any amo, amas, amat, so rather than risk having a blackboard rubber hurled at my ear, I thought I'd ask here, first, before using it and be told it's totally wrong... 'as any fule kno'.
 

Ater Gladius

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

I have no idea why you can't use English (or whatever language your text in) for the phrase. Is using the pretentious Lingua Latina really necessary?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Hello,

Sorry if I'm dumb, but what is it exactly that you wanted to say?

In situ parentis is literally "in the position of the/a parent", but I'm not sure how I would interpret it.

In loco parentis, as you may already know, means "in place of a parent", i.e. it's said when someone who isn't really your parent behaves as such or you consider them as such.
 

Aurifex

Aedilis

  • Aedilis

  • Patronus

Would it be reasonable to use this phrase when referring to a parent with whom a child lives? (as opposed to an estranged parent).
I suppose you mean what is often referred to as a "single parent".
It's difficult to say what this would be in Latin and there's probably no ideal short phrase for it. One compromise might be parens a contubernali destitutus (or destituta if you're a woman), literally "a parent deserted by his/her partner".
 

Causas

New Member

@#2 (aka grumpus maximus)
Yes I quite agree. As a small boy, in detention & struggling with declensions, I always felt Latin was totally unnecessary and should be banned. However, it remains in use in the modern vernacular and is used ad hoc…oops there I go again… you must be getting really annoyed now… suggest you go and mark some homework with a BIG red pen; you’ll feel better.

To all other respondents: thank you for your replies, which confirm that my neologism would be erroneous or confusing, at the very least. Referring to “the parent in situ” is perfectly adequate for my purposes, so I’ll stick with that.
 

scrabulista

Consul

  • Consul

I was thinking there might be Lawyer Latin for this situation already. You could try going through old law dictionaries.
 
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