In Verrem 17

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Vērum, quod ego labōribus, perīculīs, inimīcitiīsque meīs, tum cum admissum erit dēdecus sevērē mē persecūtūrum esse polliceor, id nē accīdat, tū tuā auctōritāte, sapientiā, dīligentiā, M'. Glabriō, potes prōvidēre.

I am struggling to make sense of this, and none of the translations / commentaries make sense either.

I could understand polliceor mē persecūtūrum esse dēdecus labōribus, perīculīs, inimīcitiīsque meīs
but what is the quod doing?

I presume the overall meaning is that M. Glabrio can prevent the scandal which would occur if Verres was acquitted, whose perpetrators Cicero would then prosecute.
 

cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Cicero uses the word religio a lot in the speech, which Yonge translates as religious obligations. Is it religious obligations as we would understand it, or more the expectation that one would adhere to the mores maiorum?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Vērum, quod ego labōribus, perīculīs, inimīcitiīsque meīs, tum cum admissum erit dēdecus sevērē mē persecūtūrum esse polliceor, id nē accīdat, tū tuā auctōritāte, sapientiā, dīligentiā, M'. Glabriō, potes prōvidēre.

I am struggling to make sense of this, and none of the translations / commentaries make sense either.

I could understand polliceor mē persecūtūrum esse dēdecus labōribus, perīculīs, inimīcitiīsque meīs
but what is the quod doing?

I presume the overall meaning is that M. Glabrio can prevent the scandal which would occur if Verres was acquitted, whose perpetrators Cicero would then prosecute.
Here's a simplification: tu potes providere ne id scelus accidat quod ego me persecuturum esse polliceor.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Cicero uses the word religio a lot in the speech, which Yonge translates as religious obligations. Is it religious obligations as we would understand it, or more the expectation that one would adhere to the mores maiorum?
A little bit of both, I think. politics and religion were not really separate issues amongst Romans and much of what they considered "religious obligations" might just be "civic duties" in the parlance of our time. I don't really know how Cicero argues in terms of religio in his Verres speeches, though ... I would have to look at the text passages to give you some opinion on what he has in mind there.

That i should be short.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
I agree that's a tricky Ciceronian period.
 
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