Indirect Statement Part 2

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
NOTE: This guide assumes you know the basics of indirect statement (see Ignis Umbra 's guide), indirect commands, and indirect questions. If you can understand these sentences you are good:

Magister dixit se linguam Latinam docturum esse.
Tum imperavit discipulis ut diligenter audirent.
Sed discipuli eum rogaverunt cur necesse esset Latinam linguam discere.

——————————————————————————————————

Now that that's out of the way:

Oratio Obliqua, literally meaning "Slanted Speech", is an extremely common construction in Latin writers of all levels, and it is extremely important to comprehend nearly any historical writer from Caesar to Livy and beyond.
This guide will cover some of the more advanced aspects of this construction, including subordinate clauses, sequence of tenses, and creating longer passages with it, as well as how to convert it to direct speech. At the end there will be some general examples from Caesar, Livy, and Sallust. Translation of oratio obliqua into English will not be a major focus.
For the purposes of this guide 'abcd' will represent indirect speech.
——————————————————————————————————

Eliminations in Oratio Obliqua

Very often, infinitives which are formed by a participle and a form of "esse" are contracted down to just the participle.

Magister dixit 'se linguam Latinam docturum'. (for docturum esse)

This can also happen even when there is no participle:
From Sallust: "Vos cognovi fortes fidosque mihi" (for "fortes fidosque esse")

Another common elimination is the accusative subject.
For instance, Livy was talking about a letter (litterae) that was being given. Then he gives the following clause: "Postquam datas sensit", for "Postquam eas (litteras) datas esse sensit". But by the context it is clear what he is talking about.

It can also very commonly happen that "ut" is eliminated from an indirect command.
Imperavit 'se diligenter audirent'.

——————————————————————————————————

A note on the use of pronouns in Oratio Obliqua

This is the rule for pronouns (assuming that a 3rd person narrator is telling this Oratio Obliqua)

1. Forms of ego or nos (forms referring to the speaker(s)) become forms of sui, sibi, se, se.
Recta: Magister imperavit discipulis "Diligenter me audite!"
Obliqua: Magister imperavit discipulis 'ut diligenter se audirent'.
Forms of meus or noster become forms of suus.
Recta: "Cur meum canem interfecisti?"
Obliqua: Rogavit 'cur suum canem interfecisset'.

When forms of "sui" are lacking (nom. sg.), or there is too much ambiguity with the normal reflexive use of "sui", ipse, ipsa, ipsum can be used instead.

2. Forms of tu, vos and 3rd person forms become is, ea, id or ille, illa, illud.
Forms of hic, haec, hoc become forms of ille, illa, illud.
(hodie becomes illo die, nunc becomes tunc, cras becomes postero die, etc.)
Recta: "Tu, Danti, discipulus es stultissimus!"
Obliqua: Magister Dantio dixit 'eum discipulum esse stultissimum'.
tuus and vester (assuming that tu or vos is not the subject) become eius / illius / eorum / earum / illorum / illarum, etc.
Recta: "Magister, ego tuum canem interfeci."
Obliqua: Dantius magistro dixit 'se eius canem interfecisse'.

3. Forms of the reflexive pronouns become forms of sui, sibi, se, se.
Forms of tuus/vester, etc. in a reflexive sense and suus become forms of suus.
Note that this causes situations where in the same sentence two forms of "sui" or "suus" can refer to different people: e.g. (from Nepos)
Recta: "noli inimicissimum nostrum tecum habere, mihique eum dede".
Obliqua: A rege petiere 'ne inimicissimum suum secum haberet, sibique eum dederet'.

——————————————————————————————————

Conversion of Tenses in Oratio Obliqua (Main Clauses)
When I say "depending on tense of main verb", I mean that the first option will be used after a Present/Future tense verb, the second option after a Past tense verb.
STATEMENTS: This will relate to the tense of the infinitive.
Recta: Present Tense
Obliqua: Present Infinitive

Recta: Imperfect, Perfect, Pluperfect Tense
Obliqua: Perfect Infinitive

Recta: Future Tense (Active)
Obliqua: Future Infinitive

Recta: Future Tense (Passive)
Obliqua: Supine w/ iri or fore ut + pres. / impf. subj. (depending on tense of main verb)

Recta: Future Perfect Tense (Active) (rare)

Obliqua: Rephrased as passive (usually), or fore ut + perf. / plupf. subj.

Recta: Future Perfect Tense (Passive) (rare)
Obliqua: Perfect Passive Participle with fore

QUESTIONS: This will relate to the tense of the subjunctive.
Recta: Present Tense
Obliqua: Pres. / Impf. Tense (depending on tense of main verb)

Recta: Imperfect, Perfect, Pluperfect Tense
Obliqua: Perf. / Plupf. Tense (depending on tense of main verb)

Recta: Future Tense
Obliqua: ACTIVE: -urus sit / esset; PASSIVE: futurum sit / esset ut (+ pres / impf subj)

Recta: Future Perfect Tense
Obliqua: futurum sit / esset ut (+ perf / plupf subj)

COMMANDS:
Present or Imperfect tense depending on tense of main verb.

——————————————————————————————————
PRACTICE PROBLEMS FOR CONVERSION #1
Convert recta to obliqua or vice versa. For recta to obliqua, convert it after both a past and present main verb.

1. "Quo usque tandem abutere patientia mea?"
2. Imperavit servo 'omnes fores aedificii sui circumiret'.
3. Rogat 'quid sibi velit aut cur in suam patriam venerit'.
4. "Ego cras interficiar a multis coniuratis." (do this in two ways)
5. Dixit 'multos abhinc annos suum amicum ab illo viro interfectum'.
6. "Quando haec imperata perfeceris?"
7. "Marcus, coactus a me aliisque inimicis, mox mortem sibi consciscet."
8. A Gallis quaesiverunt 'cur non dedissent sibi postulatum frumentum'.

1. Rogat 'quo usque tandem abusurus sit patientia sua'.
Rogavit 'quo usque tandem abusurus esset patientia sua'.
2. "Omnes fores aedificii mei circumi!"
3. "Quid tibi vis aut cur in meam patriam venisti?"
4. WAY 1: Dicit / Dixit 'se postero die interfectum iri a multis coniuratis'.
WAY 2: Dicit 'postero die fore ut interficiatur a multis coniuratis'
Dixit 'postero die fore ut interficeretur a multis coniuratis'.
5. "Multos abhinc annos meus amicus ab illo/hoc viro interfectus est."
6. Rogat 'quando futurum sit ut illa imperata perfecerit'.
Rogavit 'quando futurum esset ut illa imperata perfecisset'.
7. Dicit / Dixit 'Marcum, coactum a se aliisque inimicis, mox mortem sibi consciturum'.
8. "Cur non dedistis mihi postulatum frumentum?"

——————————————————————————————————

Subordinate Clauses in Oratio Obliqua

As a rule, all subordinate clauses (except those that are merely comments by the narrator) are in the subjunctive mood. This includes relative clauses, conditional statements, causal clauses, and many others.

But what tense of the subjunctive is used? Here are some general rules.
Ecce: another conversion chart for subordinate clauses
Recta: Present Tense: "Quod ad me attinet ..."
Obliqua: Present or Imperfect Subjunctive: Dicit: 'quod ad se attineat'; dixit: 'quod ad se attineret'

Recta: Perfect Tense: "Gratias mihi agite quod patriam liberavi periculo."
Obliqua: Perf or Plupf Subj:
Imperat: 'gratias sibi agant quod ... liberarit'; Imperavit: 'gratias sibi agerent quod ... liberasset'
(if the main clause's verb is past tense, this will always be pluperfect subjunctive)

Recta: Imperfect Tense: "Necavi illum virum qui me vexabat."
Obliqua: Impf. Subj. (if the verb in the oratio obliqua sentence is past tense, the sequence of the main verb is generally ignored): Dicit / Dixit: 'se necasse illum virum qui se vexaret'.

Recta: Pluperfect Tense: "Necavi illum virum qui filiam meam necarat."
Obliqua: Plupf. Subj. (see rule above): Dicit/Dixit: 'se necasse illum virum qui filiam suam necasset'.

Recta: Future Tense: "Si bellum cum Romanis erit, ego auxilio utar vestro."
Obliqua: Assuming the main clause is also future for context, Pres. or Impf. Subj. (use the periphrastic if there is not enough clarity): Dicit: 'si bellum cum Romanis sit, se auxilio eorum usurum'; Dixit: 'si bellum cum Romanis foret, se auxilio eorum usurum'.

Recta: Future Perfect Tense: "Si hodie foras exieris, morieris!"
Obliqua: Perfect / Pluperfect Subjunctive: Dicit: 'si illo die foras exierit, eum moriturum esse'; Dixit: 'si illo die foras exisset, eum moriturum esse'.

Of course, there is an exception: some clauses (regularly coordinating relative clauses, rarely cum inversum, quemadmodum, etc.), which are considered to have equal importance to the main clause to the point that they are almost a main clause, will take the accusative and infinitive:
Plebs queritur 'se diu noctuque laborare cogi, cum interim patres otio frui'.

——————————————————————————————————

Contrary-to-Fact Conditionals in Oratio Obliqua

From the previous section, it should already be clear how to form conditional statements whose apodosis is in the indicative. But what about contrary-to-fact ones? Well, Future Less Vivid conditionals can not be distinguished from Future More Vivid in oratio obliqua.
So Dixit 'si bellum cum Romanis foret, se auxilio eorum usurum'. Could also become "si bellum cum Romanis sit, auxilio vestro utar". Only context can help you tell.

For Present / Past Contrary to Fact Conditionals, the important rule to remember is this:
past tenses of "sum" with a future active participle can be used instead of subjunctive in apodoses of these conditionals:
Quid futurum fuit (= fuisset) si Caesar non mortuus esset?
What would've happened if Caesar had not died?

This rule will allow us to create contrary to fact conditionals:
Recta: "Invitus dico hominis causa, nec dicerem ni caritas rei publicae vinceret."
Obliqua: Dixit 'Invitum se dicere hominis causa, nec dicturum fuisse ni caritas rei publicae vinceret.'

Recta: "Non superstes filiae fuissem, nisi spem ulciscendae mortis eius habuissem."
Obliqua: Dixit 'se non superstitem filiae futurum fuisse, nisi spem ulciscendae mortis eius habuisset.'

Note that if the conditional is in a subordinate clause (or indirect question), the perfect tense (fuerit, fuerint) is regularly used regardless of sequence of tenses.

Recta: "Quomodo vicisses si non te adiuvisset Marcus?"
Obliqua: Rogavit 'quomodo victurus fuerit si non eum adiuvisset Marcus'.

——————————————————————————————————

THE FINAL SECTION: Long Speeches In Oratio Obliqua

Oftentimes you will not just see a single statement, question, or command, but a whole speech of many sentences including questions, commands, and statements reported at once.

Generally the procedure for these is the same as normal oratio obliqua, except that commands in the middle of these speeches will not use "ut". Accusative subjects shared across many sentences will not always be repeated so be careful of that.

Some shorter examples (longer will be provided in the practice)

"Cras meam domum venite: volo de re publica agere."
Imperavit 'ut postero die suam domum venirent: se velle de re publica agere'.

"Ego adsum. Quid me facere vis?"
Dixit 'se adesse. Quid se facere vellet?'

"Quomodo periculo liberer? Di me iuvent!"
Rogavit 'quomodo periculo liberaretur. Di se iuvarent!'

RHETORICAL QUESTIONS: When a question is not expecting an answer but is used as a more compelling statement, the Acc+Inf is used rather than the subjunctive.

"Rebellandum nobis est contra Romanos. Quis enim dubitat quin Romani crudelissimi imperatores sint?"
Dixerunt 'rebellandum sibi esse contra Romanos. Quem enim dubitare quin Romani crudelissimi imperatores essent?'

REPRAESENTATIO: In these long speeches, occasionally the sequence of tenses will be ignored for subordinate clauses (never cum-clauses, commands, questions), and the primary sequence options (first choices in this guide) will be chosen no matter what. This mimics the tenses used by the speaker and is thus called repraesentatio (bringing back to the present). Caesar will often, halfway through a speech, start using repraesentatio. Livy regularly uses it after the first sentence.

UNEXPECTED ORATIO OBLIQUA: Oftentimes oratio obliqua will be used just to show the thoughts of a person, or develop naturally from another construction. Such as:
In dies ira plebi crescit: 'se diu noctuque laborare cogi, cum interim patres otio frui'.

——————————————————————————————————

PRACTICE PROBLEMS #2 — Obliqua to Recta!
Can you do it? Here are some Practice Problems. Remember to think carefully about "se"'s double role!
HINT: Be very careful about who is being spoken to — if their name appears in the oratio obliqua, turn it to a form of tu.

Caesar legatis respondit 'diem se ad deliberandum sumpturum: si quid vellent, ad Id. April. reverterentur'.

"Diem ego ad deliberandum sumam: si quid vultis, ad Id. April. revertimini".

Ei legationi Ariovistus respondit: 'si quid ipsi a Caesare opus esset, sese ad eum venturum fuisse; si quid ille se velit, illum ad se venire oportere'.

"Si quid mihi a Caesare opus esset, ego ad eum venirem / venissem; si quid ille me vult, illum ad me venire oportet.

His Prusia negare ausus non est, sed dixit, 'ne id a se fieri postularent, quod adversus ius hospitii esset: ipsi, si possent, Hannibalem comprehenderent; locum ubi esset, facile inventuros'.
(Prusia has just been asked to give up Hannibal who is with him)

"Nolite id a me fieri (=ut id a me fiat) postulare, quod adversus ius hospitii est: vos ipsi, si potestis, Hannibalem comprehendite; locum ubi est facile invenietis."

Ad ea Bocchus placide et benigne respondit: 'se non hostili animo, sed ob regnum tutandum arma cepisse. Nam Numidiae partem, unde vi Iugurtham expulerit, iure belli suam factam; eam vastari a Mario pati nequivisse. Praeterea missis antea Romam legatis repulsum ab amicitia. Ceterum vetera omittere ac tum, si per Marium liceret, legatos ad senatum missurum'.

"Ego non hostili animo, sed ob regnum tutandum arma cepi. Nam Numidiae pars, unde vi Iugurtham expuli, iure belli mea facta (est); eam vastari a Mario pati nequivi. Praeterea missis antea Romam legatis repulsus (sum) ab amicitia. Ceterum vetera omitto ac tum, si per Marium licebit/licet, legatos ad senatum mittam."

Is Helvetius ita cum Caesare egit: 'si pacem populus Romanus cum Helvetiis faceret, in eam partem ituros atque ibi futuros Helvetios ubi eos Caesar constituisset atque esse voluisset; sin bello persequi perseveraret, reminisceretur et veteris incommodi populi Romani et pristinae virtutis Helvetiorum. Quod improviso unum pagum adortus esset, cum ii qui flumen transissent suis auxilium ferre non possent, ne ob eam rem aut suae magnopere virtuti tribueret aut ipsos despiceret. Se ita a patribus maioribusque suis didicisse, ut magis virtute contenderent quam dolo aut insidiis niterentur. Quare ne committeret ut is locus ubi constitissent ex calamitate populi Romani et internecione exercitus nomen caperet aut memoriam proderet'.

: "Si pacem populus Romanus cum Helvetiis faciet, in eam partem ibunt atque ibi erunt Helvetii ubi eos Caesar constituerit atque esse voluerit; sin bello persequi perseverabit, reminiscere et veteris incommodi populi Romani et pristinae virtutis Helvetiorum. Quod improviso unum pagum adortus es, cum ii qui flumen transierant suis auxilium ferre non possent, noli ob eam rem aut tuae magnopere virtuti tribuere aut nos/ipsos despicere. Ego ita a patribus maioribusque meis didici, ut magis virtute contenderemus quam dolo aut insidiis niteremur. Quare noli committere ut is locus ubi constiterint ex calamitate populi Romani et internecione exercitus nomen capiat aut memoriam prodat."

At Bocchus postero die Asparem, Iugurthae regis legatum, appellat dicitque 'sibi ex Sulla cognitum posse condicionibus bellum poni: quam ob rem regis sui sententiam exquireret'.

"Mihi ex Sulla cognitum (est) posse condicionibus bellum poni: quam ob rem regis tui sententiam exquire."

Iugurtha Boccho nuntiat 'se cupere omnia quae imperarentur facere, sed Mario parum confidere; saepe antea cum imperatoribus Romanis pacem conventam frustra fuisse. Ceterum Bocchus si sibi Romanisque consultum et ratam pacem vellet, daret operam, ut una ab omnibus quasi de pace in colloquium veniretur, ibique sibi Sullam traderet. Cum talem virum in potestatem habuisset, tum fore uti iussu senatus aut populi foedus fieret'.

"Ego cupio omnia quae imperantur facere, sed Mario parum confido; saepe antea cum imperatoribus Romanis pax conventa frustra fuit. Ceterum tu, Bocche, si mihi Romanisque consultum et ratam pacem vis, da operam, ut una ab omnibus quasi de pace in colloquium veniatur, ibique mihi Sullam trade. Cum talem virum in potestatem habuero, tum iussu senatus aut populi foedus fiet."

Diviciacus multis cum lacrimis Caesarem obsecrare coepit 'ne quid gravius in fratrem statueret: scire se illa esse vera, nec quemquam ex eo plus quam se doloris capere, propterea quod, cum ipse gratia plurimum domi atque in reliqua Gallia, ille minimum propter adulescentiam posset, per se crevisset; quibus opibus ac nervis non solum ad minuendam gratiam, sed paene ad perniciem suam uteretur. Sese tamen et amore fraterno et existimatione vulgi commoveri. Quod si quid ei a Caesare gravius accidisset, cum ipse eum locum amicitiae apud eum teneret, neminem existimaturum non sua voluntate factum; qua ex re futurum uti totius Galliae animi a se averterentur.'

"Noli aliquid gravius in fratrem statuere: ego scio illa esse vera, nec quisquam ex eo plus quam ego doloris capit, propterea quod, cum ego gratia plurimum domi atque in reliqua Gallia, ille minimum propter adulescentiam posset, per se crevit; quibus opibus ac nervis non solum ad minuendam gratiam, sed paene ad perniciem suam/meam (hard to tell) utitur. Ego tamen et amore fraterno et existimatione vulgi commoveor. Quod si quid ei a te gravius acciderit, cum ego eum locum amicitiae apud te teneam, nemo existimabit non mea voluntate factum; qua ex re totius Galliae animi a me avertentur."

Ad haec Ariovistus Germanus respondit: 'ius esse belli ut qui vicissent iis quos vicissent quem ad modum vellent imperarent. Item populum Romanum victis non ad alterius praescriptum, sed ad suum arbitrium imperare consuesse. Si ipse populo Romano non praescriberet quem ad modum suo iure uteretur, non oportere se a populo Romano in suo iure impediri. Haeduos sibi, quoniam belli fortunam temptassent et armis congressi ac superati essent, stipendiarios esse factos. Magnam Caesarem iniuriam facere, qui suo adventu vectigalia sibi deteriora faceret. Haeduis se obsides redditurum non esse neque his neque eorum sociis iniuria bellum inlaturum, si in eo manerent quod convenisset stipendiumque quotannis penderent; si id non fecissent, longe iis fraternum nomen populi Romani afuturum. Quod sibi Caesar denuntiaret se Haeduorum iniurias non neglecturum, neminem secum sine sua pernicie contendisse. Cum vellet, congrederetur: intellecturum quid invicti Germani, exercitatissimi in armis, qui inter annos XIIII tectum non subissent, virtute possent'.

"Ius est belli ut qui vicerint iis quos vicerint quem ad modum velint imperent. Item populus Romanus victis non ad alterius praescriptum, sed ad suum arbitrium imperare consuevit. Si ego ipse populo Romano non praescribo quem ad modum suo iure utatur, non oportet me a populo Romano in meo iure impediri. Haedui mihi, quoniam belli fortunam temptarant et armis congressi ac superati erant, stipendarii sunt facti. Magnam, Caesar, iniuriam facis, qui tuo adventu vectigalia mihi deteriora facis. Haeduis ego obsides non reddam neque his neque eorum sociis iniuria bellum inferam, si in eo manebunt quod convenit stipendiumque quotannis pendent; si id non fecerint, longe iis fraternum nomen populi Romani aberit. Quod mihi tu denuntias te Haeduorum iniurias non neglecturum, nemo mecum sine sua pernicie contendit. Cum vis, congredere: intelleges quid (nos) invicti Germani, exercitatissimi in armis, qui inter annos XIIII tectum non subivimus, virtute possimus."

C. Terentilius consulibus absentibus ratus locum tribuniciis actionibus datum, per aliquot dies patrum superbiam ad plebem criminatus, maxime in consulare imperium tamquam nimium nec tolerabile liberae civitati invehebatur: 'nomine enim tantum minus invidiosum, re ipsa prope atrocius quam regium esse; quippe duos pro uno dominos acceptos, immoderata, infinita potestate, qui soluti atque effrenati ipsi omnes metus legum omniaque supplicia verterent in plebem. Quae ne aeterna illis licentia sit, legem se promulgaturum ut quinque viri creentur legibus de imperio consulari scribendis; quod populus in se ius dederit, eo consulem usurum, non ipsos libidinem ac licentiam suam pro lege habituros'.
"Nomine (enim) tantum minus invidiosum (est), re ipsa prope atrocius quam regium est; quippe duo pro uno domini accepti (sunt), immoderata, infinita potestate, qui soluti atque effrenati ipsi omnes metus legum omniaque supplicia vertunt in plebem. Quae ne aeterna illis licentia sit, legem promulgabo ut quinque viri creentur legibus de imperio consulari scribendis; quod populus in se ius dederit, eo consul utetur, non ipsi libidinem ac licentiam suam pro lege habebunt."

Senatus in Terentilium legemque eius est invectus: 'insidiatum eum et tempore capto adortum rem publicam. Si quem similem eius priore anno inter morbum bellumque irati di tribunum dedissent, non potuisse sisti. Mortuis duobus consulibus, iacente aegra civitate, in conluvione omnium rerum, ad tollendum rei publicae consulare imperium laturum leges fuisse, ducem Volscis Aequisque ad oppugnandam urbem futurum. Quid tandem? Illi non licere, si quid consules superbe in aliquem civium aut crudeliter fecerint, diem dicere, accusare iis ipsis iudicibus quorum in aliquem saevitum sit? Non illum consulare imperium sed tribuniciam potestatem invisam intolerandamque facere; quam placatam reconciliatamque patribus de integro in antiqua redigi mala'.

(it's OK if you make it 3rd person, hard to tell without, or even with, context whether Terentilius was being addressed or not) "Insidiatus es et, tempore capto, adortus rem publicam. Si quem similem tui priore anno inter morbum bellumque irati di tribunum dedissent, non potuit sisti. Mortuis duobus consulibus, iacente aegra civitate, in conluvione omnium rerum, ad tollendum rei publicae consulare imperium leges tulisses, dux Volscis Aequisque ad oppugnandam urbem fuisses. Quid tandem? Tibi non licet, si quid consules superbe in aliquem civium aut crudeliter fecerint, diem dicere, accusare iis ipsis iudicibus quorum in aliquem saevitum erit? Non consulare imperium sed tribuniciam potestatem invisam intolerandamque facis; quae placata reconciliataque patribus de integro in antiqua redigitur mala."

BONUS: Ariovistus Caesari dixit 'transisse Rhenum sese non sua sponte, sed rogatum et arcessitum a Gallis; non sine magna spe magnisque praemiis domum propinquosque reliquisse; sedes habere in Gallia ab ipsis concessas, obsides ipsorum voluntate datos; stipendium capere iure belli, quod victores victis imponere consuerint. Non sese Gallis sed Gallos sibi bellum intulisse: omnes Galliae civitates ad se oppugnandum venisse ac contra se castra habuisse; eas omnes copias a se uno proelio pulsas ac superatas esse. Si iterum experiri velint, se iterum paratum esse decertare; si pace uti velint, iniquum esse de stipendio recusare, quod sua voluntate ad id tempus pependerint. Amicitiam populi Romani sibi ornamento et praesidio, non detrimento esse oportere, atque se hac spe petisse. Si per populum Romanum stipendium remittatur et dediticii subtrahantur, non minus libenter sese recusaturum populi Romani amicitiam quam adpetierit. Quod multitudinem Germanorum in Galliam traducat, id se sui muniendi, non Galliae oppugnandae causa facere; eius rei testimonium esse quod nisi rogatus non venerit et quod bellum non intulerit sed defenderit. Se prius in Galliam venisse quam populum Romanum. Numquam ante hoc tempus exercitum populi Romani Galliae provinciae finibus egressum. Quid sibi vellet? Cur in suas possessiones veniret? Provinciam suam hanc esse Galliam, sicut illam nostram. Ut ipsi concedi non oporteret, si in nostros fines impetum faceret, sic item nos esse iniquos, quod in suo iure se interpellaremus. Quod fratres a senatu Haeduos appellatos diceret, non se tam barbarum neque tam imperitum esse rerum ut non sciret neque bello Allobrogum proximo Haeduos Romanis auxilium tulisse neque ipsos in iis contentionibus quas Haedui secum et cum Sequanis habuissent auxilio populi Romani usos esse. Debere se suspicari simulata Caesarem amicitia, quod exercitum in Gallia habeat, sui opprimendi causa habere. Qui nisi decedat atque exercitum deducat ex his regionibus, sese illum non pro amico sed pro hoste habiturum. Quod si eum interfecerit, multis sese nobilibus principibusque populi Romani gratum esse facturum (id se ab ipsis per eorum nuntios compertum habere), quorum omnium gratiam atque amicitiam eius morte redimere posset. Quod si decessisset et liberam possessionem Galliae sibi tradidisset, magno se illum praemio remuneraturum et quaecumque bella geri vellet sine ullo eius labore et periculo confecturum.'
(note: "nostram" should become "vestram" in the oratio obliqua. This is because the people being addressed are Romans, and the narrator is a Roman, so the narrator calls this possession of the Romans "provincia nostra".)
The answer to this one should be coming soon :)

And lastly: Dantius sodalibus huius fori dixit: 'Si quae menda in hoc scribendo fecisset, quod certe accidisset, ea corrigerent.'
Si quae menda in hoc scribendo feci, quod certe accidit, ea corrigite.

Gratias tibi quod hoc legisti, et spero te aliquid ad orationem obliquam pertinens didicisse.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Nice! A few little mistakes and typos:
2. Imperavit servo 'omnes fores aedificii sui circumiret'.
2. "Omnes fores aedificii mei circumite!"
Circumi.
4. WAY 1: Dicit / Dixit 'se postero die interfecturum iri a multis coniuratis'.
Interfectum.
Recta: Perfect Tense: "Gratias mihi agite quod patriam liberavi periculo."
Obliqua: Impf or Plupf Subj:
Pf.
Recta: Future Perfect Tense: "Si hodie foras exieris, moriaris!"
Morieris.
ibi erunt (nos) Helvetii
(nostri) Helvetiorum.
I know you're putting nos and nostri in parentheses because they're talking about themselves in the third person, but it looks confusing/misleading because it would be ungrammatical if they were really included (you can't say erunt nos, and nostri Helvetiorum doesn't agree either). I think it's better just to remove the parentheses.
noli ob eam rem aut tuae magnopere virtuti tribue
Tribuere.
ego scire illa esse vera
Scio.
quibus opibus ac nervis non solum ad minuendam gratiam, sed paene ad perniciem suam uteretur.
You forgot to adapt this to oratio recta. Ad perniciem meam utitur.
nemo existimabit non mea voluntate factum; qua ex re totius Galliae animi a me avertantur.
Avertentur.
Well, a change from the future to the subjunctive is probably not impossible either, but the future looks more regular.
Ius est belli ut qui vicerint iis quos vicerint quem ad modum volunt imperent.
Velint.
quam ad modum
Typo.
quod populus in se ius dederit, eo consul utatur
Utetur.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Maximas gratias as usual! I corrected the mistakes you mentioned.
"
quibus opibus ac nervis non solum ad minuendam gratiam, sed paene ad perniciem suam uteretur.
You forgot to adapt this to oratio recta. Ad perniciem meam utitur."

Yes the "uteretur" was a mistake but I did mean to keep the suam, as the brother may be about to receive the death penalty (he conspired against Caesar). It's very hard to tell though as both of them are facing pernicies so I decided to put both in.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
Oh, one other thing I forgot to mention, regarding
UNEXPECTED ORATIO OBLIQUA:
Here are some more examples illustrating this concept:
Sometimes subordinate clauses can form themselves in the manner of oratio obliqua without an Acc+Inf main clause.
Caesar iis pollicetur auxilium 'si a Germanis premerentur'.
Here the word "auxilium" does not form a real indirect statement, but the "si" clause acts like it is.

This sentence could be rewritten as:
Caesar iis pollicetur 'iis se auxiliaturum si a Germanis premerentur'.

Another example:
Dictator eum capitis damnavit 'quod se vetante pugnavisset'.
Here, again, the "quod" clause takes the subjunctive despite the fact that there is no Acc+Inf for it to depend on. However it is the dictator's reason for sentencing "eum" to death. Note also that "se" is used to refer to the Dictator just like normal indirect speech.

By a strange transference words in a causal clause which introduce oratio obliqua will sometimes be in the subjunctive.

Dantius Caesari irascebatur quod crederet ab eo fratrem suum interfectum.

——————————————
Also of course the answer to the bonus:

"Transii Rhenum ego non mea sponte, sed rogatus et arcessitus a Gallis; non sine magna spe magnisque praemiis domum propinquosque reliqui; sedes habeo in Gallia ab ipsis concessas, obsides ipsorum voluntate datos (or obsides ipsorum voluntate dati sunt; it's hard to tell whether that phrase is the object of "habeo" or its own thing); stipendium capio iure belli, quod victores victis imponere consuerunt. Non ego Gallis sed Galli mihi bellum intulerunt: omnes Galliae civitates ad me oppugnandum venerunt ac contra me castra habuerunt; eae omnes copiae a me uno proelio pulsae ac superatae sunt. Si iterum experiri volunt, ego iterum paratus sum decertare; si pace uti volunt, iniquum est de stipendio recusare, quod sua voluntate ad id tempus pependerunt. Amicitiam populi Romani mihi ornamento et praesidio, non detrimento esse oportet, atque ego hac spe petivi. Si per populum Romanum stipendium remittetur et dediticii subtrahentur, non minus libenter ego recusabo populi Romani amicitiam quam adpetii. Quod multitudinem Germanorum in Galliam traduco, id ego mei muniendi, non Galliae oppugnandae causa facio; eius rei testimonium est quod nisi rogatus non veni et quod bellum non intuli sed defendi. Ego prius in Galliam veni quam populus Romanus. Numquam ante hoc tempus exercitus populi Romani Galliae provinciae finibus egressus (est). Quid tibi vis (or Quid sibi vult; could be referring to Caesar or Populus Romanus)? Cur in meas possessiones venis (or venit)? Provincia mea haec est Gallia, sicut illa vestra. Ut mihi concedi non oporteat, si in vestros fines impetum faciam, sic item vos estis iniqui, quod in meo iure me interpellatis. Quod fratres a senatu Haeduos appellatos dicis, non ego tam barbarus neque tam imperitus sum rerum ut nesciam neque bello Allobrogum proximo Haeduos (vobis) Romanis auxilium tulisse neque ipsos in iis contentionibus quas Haedui mecum et cum Sequanis habuerint auxilio populi Romani usos esse. Debeo ego suspicari simulata te Caesarem amicitia, quod exercitum in Gallia habes, mei opprimendi causa habere. Qui nisi decedes atque exercitum deduces ex his regionibus, ego te non pro amico sed pro hoste habebo. Quod si te interfecero, multis me nobilibus principibusque populi Romani gratum faciam (id ego ab ipsis per eorum nuntios compertum habeo), quorum omnium gratiam atque amicitiam tua morte redimere possum. Quod si decesseris et liberam possessionem Galliae mihi tradideris, magno ego te praemio remunerabor et quaecumque bella geri vis sine ullo tuo labore et periculo conficiam."
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Dantius Caesarem indignabatur
Can indignor take a person as object? I can find no example.
sedes habeo in Gallia ab ipsis concessas, obsides ipsorum voluntate datos (or obsides ipsorum voluntate dati sunt; it's hard to tell whether that phrase is the object of "habeo" or its own thing);
Though either is in theory possible, I took it as the former.
Ut mihi concedi non oportebit, si in vestros fines impetum faciam
Either a present contrary-to-fact (... non oporteret... si... facerem) or a future-less-vivid (... non oporteat... si... faciam) would feel more natural than the future here. Perhaps the contrary-to-fact is the best choice.
non ego tam barbarus neque tam imperitus sum rerum ut non scio
Nesciam.
in iis contentionibus quas Haedui secum et cum Sequanis habuissent
Mecum... habuerint
(te) Caesarem
Te is more natural if he's addressing him.
multis me nobilibus principibusque populi Romani gratum faciam
Hm, I first took this for a mistake, but now I realize you probably understand the sentence in the original as "make himself appreciated". I understood it as "do something appreciated (a pleasure)". I guess both are possible.
tuo morte
Tua.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens
Staff member
"Recta: Future Perfect Tense (Active) (rare)

Obliqua: Rephrased as passive (usually), or fore ut + perf. / plupf. subj.

Recta: Future Perfect Tense (Passive) (rare)
Obliqua: Perfect Passive Participle with fore "

For me these are almost entirely theoretical. I've seen one "parata fore" in Caesar though. But has anyone here actually seen something definitively future perfect, or a "fore ut + perf. / plupf. subj."?
 
Top