Infantes ac mulieres

Big Ups

Member
The "plus aliis" is giving me trouble. Is it "more than others?" Thanks.

Infantes quoque ac mulieres et iuuenes et grossa corpora habentes et colorem rubeum vel coleram rubeam plus aliis sunt custodiendi.

Likewise, babies, women, and young people ought to take care, and [also] those having fat bodies and a reddish color or more red bile than others.
 

Big Ups

Member
Does it matter where the plus aliis sunt custodiendi goes in this sentence? Would you place it where I did or at the end? There is an ac, a number of ets and a vel. Does the use of vel indicate that coleram rebeam is more on its own? I thought so and that's why I left the plus aliis with it.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Does it matter where the plus aliis sunt custodiendi goes in this sentence?
No, but putting it at the end is the most natural way.

Would you place it where I did or at the end?
Both.

There is an ac, a number of ets and a vel.
The first ac can be taken be an et. The vel connects colorem rubeum and coleram rubeam.

I thought so and that's why I left the plus aliis with it.
"having a more red bile than others" would be habentes coleram magis rubeam quam alii, but I don't see how that would make any sense semantically.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Would you place it where I did or at the end?
I would place it at the end.
"having a more red bile than others" would be habentes coleram magis rubeam quam alii
You'd usually say "redder bile" rather than "a more red bile", wouldn't you?

In any case "having more red bile than others" (which was Big Up's erroneous translation) would be plus colerae rubeae habentes quam alii or plus aliis colerae rubeae habentes.
 

Big Ups

Member
I've noticed that some (links below) translate coleram rubeam as yellow bile (one of the four humors). Any insights into this trans given rubeam? If this is the case, my sentences would seem "a reddish color or yellow bile".
Here and here (Latin in the footnote trans above).
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
From a quick Google Books search, it seems that the terms "yellow bile" and "red bile" are both attested in English, and they appear to mean the same thing.



So it's probably acceptable to translate coleram rubeam whichever way you like, though the Latin literally says "red bile".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Though, looking at the sentence again, I think I'd go with "red bile" here because otherwise the analogy between colorem rubeum and coleram rubeam will be lost in translation.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Now, in actuality I guess the bile in question is more likely to be yellow than red, but the thing is people haven't always had the same conception of colors. Latin and English color names don't always match 1/1. What we see as different colors were sometimes considered shades of the same back then. In Old English, gold was usually called "red".
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Blue is black a lot in Old Norse.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Latin caeruleus can be black-ish or blue, too.
 
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