Interesting Words (moved from Games)

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

regyrare — to turn about again, to wheel around
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Something about this word looked, at first glance (and continues to each time I glance back at it even now) oddly un-Latinate to me -- more like Sanskrit or some Indian language. Not sure why; I think it's something to do with that "regy" at the start and all those r's.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

Something about this word looked, at first glance (and continues to each time I glance back at it even now) oddly un-Latinate to me -- more like Sanskrit or some Indian language. Not sure why; I think it's something to do with that "regy" at the start and all those r's.
Unfortunately, L+S doesn't say anything about the etymology. It's only attested in one sentence from Florus, though.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

It's ultimately from Greek γῦρος (= "gyrus").
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

frusto, frustare: to break to pieces (seems to be related to frustum -i, bit)

Again only attested in one Florus sentence, and the reading is dubious.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Altithronus, "high-throned" (medieval Latin).
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

Alipes — wing-footed.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

You know this one:

Praeterpropter, "more or less", "approximately".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Fey.

This English word has other meanings more common today, but it has an archaic meaning (which was its original meaning in Old English, when its form was "fæge") of "fated to die soon".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Bairn.

Meaning "child". Now a dialectal word, but its ancestor "bearn" was common in Old English. It's related to "born".
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Fey.

This English word has other meanings more common today, but it has an archaic meaning (which was its original meaning in Old English, when its form was "fæge") of "fated to die soon".
I wouldn't say any of its meanings are exactly common today.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

I wouldn't say any of its meanings are exactly common today.
But still more common than the "fated" meaning, right? This dictionary doesn't mark the other meanings as archaic, at any rate (while it does for "fated").
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

But still more common than the "fated" meaning, right? This dictionary doesn't mark the other meanings as archaic, at any rate (while it does for "fated").
I suspect most people would consider even the "otherwordly" meaning borderline archaic. But yes, it's certainly more common than "fated to die".
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

I've barely ever seen/heard that word, in any meaning.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Unræd = "bad advice" or "bad plan", "bad idea"
Unweder = "bad weather"

In OE, the prefix un- could be added to nouns to make them "bad [noun]". I find this a lovely feature.

Stæfcræft = literally "letter-craft", i.e. grammar.
 

Dantius

Homo Sapiens

  • Civis Illustris

Does "unstæfcræft" mean "bad grammar"? ;)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

I don't think that's attested, but perhaps it would have worked. :D
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

So how could one render grammaticissima in OE? :D
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

In OE, the prefix un- could be added to nouns to make them "bad [noun]". I find this a lovely feature.
Ungewitter and Unrat are a lot closer to home. Though the latter means 'filth'. Incidentally, does anyone have any idea how GT can translate it as 'uncle', but get it right in the suggested translations that appear below the main box?
 
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