Interesting Words (moved from Games)

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Now you know.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
A Scottish woman once explained that word to me in the context of bum bags. Which Americans call fanny packs. Which British people find weird.
 

Terry S.

Quaestor
Staff member
Thank you, Westcott. That has to be either Scottish or the NE of England humour!
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
LOL.
 

Serenus

legātus armisonus

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Fanny packs are good in fashion.
 

Westcott

Civis Illustris
Vicar, surveying congregation; "Is that young Fanny Green on the front row?"
Curate; "No vicar, it's just the light shining through the stained glass window."
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
joss1
noun

  • A Chinese religious statue or idol.
    ‘And last year, Italians spent over 450m euros on fortune tellers, faith - healers, holy men and joss - stick burners of every flavour.’
    ‘Producers proudly displayed products such as joss and incense sticks, belt buckles, knives textiles, scissors and papier-mâché items.’
Origin
Early 18th century from Javanese dejos, from obsolete Portuguese deos, from Latin deus ‘god’.


 

Serenus

legātus armisonus
such as joss and incense sticks
I've never come across this word before, and it's very interesting to see that "joss" is clearly treated as a mass noun there. I wonder if it generally has a negative connotation? Interestingly, I feel that if the word was a countable noun it'd be more respectful, but with that mass noun the statues are seemingly treated as mere furniture or decoration (to use other mass nouns).
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

Civis Illustris
I'd only heard it in 'joss stick', referring to incense, and vaguely assumed that the word itself meant the smelly stuff.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I think the French word "unijambiste", meaning a one-legged person, is interesting in that it sounds perfectly ridiculous.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Kinda like lackadaisical. Which means, "showing no interest, vigor, determination, or enthusiasm".
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Yes, it does... I really don't know what went through the mind of whoever coined that word.
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
A common interesting word in Portuguese will be paralelepípedo. It's very widely thought of as an interesting word. It does sound funny in Portuguese. (And it's actually Greek...)
 

meisenimverbis

Civis Illustris
This one is not thought of as an interesting word, because it's so common, I guess people never remember it, but it's a nice one: borboleta, which is a butterfly.
 
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