Interesting Words (moved from Games)

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
'Sad' is cognate with German satt and originally meant 'full' or 'solid', a meaning that still exists in the phrase 'sad iron', not that the object itself is in much use nowadays. Nobody seems to know how the prevalent meaning develope from this, but it did so quite early.
 

Etaoin Shrdlu

μεσσηγυδορποχέστης
I'm puzzled by why 'capnography' isn't in the OED, or any dictionary in OneLook apart from Merriam-Webster. Obviously there are any number of specialist scientific terms that can't be found in non-specialist dictionaries, even the OED, but I'd have thought this word was on a par with, say, 'oximetry', which generally makes the cut. I'm also puzzled as to why the Greek word for 'smoke' was chosen for carbon dioxide; you'd think there would be something less jarring, not that I can think of it.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Fika.

This word seems to be Swedish verlan!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Knuffelcontact (Dutch), literally "hug-contact", that is a person whom you are allowed to hug as per COVID measures.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Anderhalvemetersamenleving (Dutch), literally "meter-and-a-half society", that is a society where people keep a meter and a half away from one another (still in reference to COVID measures, of course).
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Godward.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Panentheism.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
Priusquam lexicon quoddam consulerim, conjiciam hoc verbum significare collocationem cujusdam rei inter digitos.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ego idem ac tu putaram.
 

Quasus

Civis Illustris
LTL PECTINATIM
Plin. 28. Hist. nat. 6. 17. (59). digitis pectinatim inter se implexis
Ovid. 9. Met. 299. digitos inter se pectine junctos (h. e. ita complicatis manibus, ut digiti invicem inserantur - Forcellini.)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
@Pacifica, what would you say is the most confusing English word to a non-native speaker? Am curious.
Hmm... That would depend on the non-native speaker and what their native language is, obviously, but as far as I'm concerned I remember being a little confused by "get" as a beginner.
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
Hmm... That would depend on the non-native speaker and what their native language is, obviously, but as far as I'm concerned I remember being a little confused by "get" as a beginner.
In expressions like "to get drunk" or "to get arrested", I guess?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Not those in particular. I guess it was more its polysemy as a whole: you can get drunk, get an idea, get milk from the store, get the bastard. I got over it quickly enough (no pun intended), I think, but I remember being uncertain how to interpret or translate it on a couple of occasions.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Trying to recall more about my basic English learning, I think "over" and "off" were a little difficult to grasp at first, too.
 
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Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"Mollibus in pratis admugit femina tauro:
Femina cornipedi semper adhinnit equo."
 
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