Is there anything like Wheelock for Greek?

alexios

New Member
Probably my favorite thing about learning Latin through Wheelock was translating real Latin sentences and passages. This doesn't really seem to exist in most Greek text books, at least not to any real extent. Is there a reason for this or am I just not looking hard enough?
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I'm curious, what Greek textbooks have you used that don't include any real Greek?

Anyway, I recommend Groton's From Alpha to Omega, An Introduction to Classical Greek, available used for only $3.99 on Amazon, as it's about as comprehensive an introduction to Greek as you can get in a beginner's textbook (a point of complaint for some, though I personally prefer it that way). It also includes readings of authentic Greek starting already with the 5th chapter; some passages are adapted, of course, but Wheelock's Latin is no different in that respect.
 

alexios

New Member
I'm not saying that the textbooks don't include original Greek, but that none of the ones I've seen use actual Greek sentences to teach the material. The majority of the material is written by the authors. Most of Wheelock was adapted Latin, but it was directly based on original texts. I felt like this made for a much more immersive experience. I'll check out the Alpha to Omega book.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I'm not saying that the textbooks don't include original Greek, but that none of the ones I've seen use actual Greek sentences to teach the material. The majority of the material is written by the authors. Most of Wheelock was adapted Latin, but it was directly based on original texts. I felt like this made for a much more immersive experience. I'll check out the Alpha to Omega book.
That's not how I remember Wheelock's at all, sorry to say. The exercises are full of fake Latin, and some of it rather questionable at that (at least in the recent editions). Honestly, I'm not sure what it is you're even asking for at this point.
 

alexios

New Member
That's not how I remember Wheelock's at all, sorry to say. The exercises are full of fake Latin, and some of it rather questionable at that (at least in the recent editions). Honestly, I'm not sure what it is you're even asking for at this point.
Uh, the 'Sententiae' are taken out of Latin texts, with unaltered versions often appearing. I dislike some of their editing choices too, but they aren't at all "fake" in the way that Athenaze's Greek passages are, for example. Giving students frequent exposure to ancient authors helps.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Uh, the 'Sententiae' are taken out of Latin texts, with unaltered versions often appearing. I dislike some of their editing choices too, but they aren't at all "fake" in the way that Athenaze's Greek passages are, for example. Giving students frequent exposure to ancient authors helps.
The passages in Groton are full passages and not individual sentences, so you get the full context.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I'm not familiar with it, but I imagine it's more of the same stuff that's in the textbook.
 
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