It is not age that matters, but the knowledge

latin geek

New Member
Ave Latin fellows,

Please, could you translate for me: "It is not age that matters, but the knowledge!"

Thanks in advance!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Hi,

Non quot quisque sit annos natus, sed quae sciat, refert!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Have you studied any Latin? I'm asking because I wouldn't explain it the same way to someone with some Latin knowledge as to someone with none.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
OK, then it's probably best if I just give you a word-for-word back-translation without using any technical terms.

Non = not
quot = how many
annos = years
natus = literally "born", but it corresponds to "old" in English in this sentence
quisque = each person
sit = is
sed = but
quae = what things
sciat = he knows
refert = matters
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
OK, then it's probably best if I just give you a word-for-word back-translation without using any technical terms.

Non = not
quot = how many
annos = years
natus = literally "born", but it corresponds to "old" in English in this sentence
quisque = each person
sit = is
sed = but
quae = what things
sciat = he knows
refert = matters


OK. Now, how would you explain this to someone who has studied the Classical Legend of Latin? I've been in this game for years, albeit quite indirectly. I haven't been giving Latin the attention it deserves over Russian, Hebrew, and French and the like. But, anyway, explain away, if you could!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Quae sciat is an indirect question and works as the subject of the impersonal verb refert. Quae is an interrogative pronoun in the neuter plural, meaning "what things", and is the direct object of sciat.

Quot quisque sit annos natus also is an indirect question, and is the subject of a second implied refert, i.e. it's as if the sentence were non quot quisque sit annos natus refert, sed quae sciat refert, but the refert doesn't actually need to be repeated as it's understood that it applies to both parts. It would be awkward to repeat it. Quot annos is an accusative of duration.

Is there anything else that you're wondering about?
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illustris
A shorter one possibly: Scientia, nōn aetās rēfert!

(The knowledge, not the age, is what matters!)


(I usually translate the phrases for myself before I see how others did it, so this is merely an alternative, no better or worse than the one you received already.)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
A shorter one possibly: Scientia, nōn aetās rēfert!

(The knowledge, not the age, is what matters!)


(I usually translate the phrases for myself before I see how others did it, so this is merely an alternative, no better or worse than the one you received already.)
Refert normally is an impersonal verb, which means it doesn't take a noun as a subject.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Quae sciat is an indirect question and works as the subject of the impersonal verb refert. Quae is an interrogative pronoun in the neuter plural, meaning "what things", and is the direct object of sciat.

Quot quisque sit annos natus also is an indirect question, and is the subject of a second implied refert, i.e. it's as if the sentence were non quot quisque sit annos natus refert, sed quae sciat refert, but the refert doesn't actually need to be repeated as it's understood that it applies to both parts. It would be awkward to repeat it. Quot annos is an accusative of duration.

Is there anything else that you're wondering about?
Nope. Thank you, gracious alma mater.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
You're welcome. Being called a "gracious alma mater" is a new one on me...
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
You're welcome. Being called a "gracious alma mater" is a new one on me...
Puella, da mi basia mille, deinde centum, dein mille altera, dein secunda centum, deinde usque altera mille, deinde centum.
 

Godmy

Sīmia Illustris
That's a bit weird thing to tell her, Issac.
We're both not easily impressed by the most known poem by Catullus, next, it doesn't come as too funny to somebody who occasionally uses Latin for normal communication... Then you take things written it with a bit more seriousness.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
That's a bit weird thing to tell her, Issac.
We're both not easily impressed by the most known poem by Catullus, next, it doesn't come as too funny to somebody who occasionally uses Latin for normal communication... Then you take things written it with a bit more seriousness.

Er. I know it's well known, that was the point. I could've written anything else to "impress", but since these are people well-read in the Latin corpus, I knew most would get it.
No. not serious.
Well, this is a weird meeting, Godmy. Wish I would've done so on other terms, lol.
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
Indeed...
Well. No reason for weirdness between us, Friend. Happy Trails!
Now, I'll proceed to the Latin-To-English translation section.
 
Top