Itaque fatis acti multos iam annos circum omnia maria errabant

I can't place fatis acti in the sentence.

Itaque fatis acti multos iam annos circum omnia maria errabant

Therefore [the Trojans] wandered for many years around all the seas.


Thanks!
 

Terry S.

scurra
Staff member
I would say that fatis acti means: [the Trojans] driven by the fates etc.

Hang about, though, and see what others have to say.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I would say that fatis acti means: [the Trojans] driven by the fates etc.

Hang about, though, and see what others have to say.
That's correct.

Note also that the imperfect in combination with an expression of length of time, like multos annos here, typically translates to the pluperfect progressive in English ("had been..."); it refers to something that had started before the relevant point in time and was still on-going. Here, the Trojans "had been wandering for many years already". "The Trojans wandered for many years" would correspond to Troiani multos annos erraverunt, perfect tense.
 

AoM

nulli numeri
I thought that itaque looked funny (Virgil doesn't use it at all in the Aeneid).

So it's one of those things that rewords (and adds to) texts. Where's it from?
 
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