Lady

Shay H.

New Member
I'm trying to find something that translates close to the idea of "Lady So and So" as an honorific for a woman of high standing.

I probably got comitessa from google translate, so I went to look it up on the English-Latin side of Online Latin Dictionary.com and got "comitissa" when I put in "countess", but it's not showing in the Latin-English look up (which has been a major help for figuring out whether the word I'm thinking of is the meaning I've looked up).

The same thing happened with "duchess" showing as "ducissa", but no latin-english entry for "ducissa".

Is this a case of "latin-ifying" a word that didn't exist in classical latin?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Comitissa and ducissa are medieval Latin words. Perhaps the Latin-English dictionary that you use includes only classical, or at least ancient, Latin, as many do. Here's a medieval Latin-English-French dictionary, in case you need it in future.

For a more general "lady" you can use domina. This (as you perhaps suspect) isn't exactly a classical use of the word, but it's the best I know of.
 

Hemo Rusticus

J. Wellington Wimpy
Pac-man's domina is probably your best bet. You might add mea before, as this is the phrase that begets our modern 'Madam'.
 

Shay H.

New Member
Comitissa and ducissa are medieval Latin words. Perhaps the Latin-English dictionary that you use includes only classical, or at least ancient, Latin, as many do. Here's a medieval Latin-English-French dictionary, in case you need it in future.

For a more general "lady" you can use domina. This (as you perhaps suspect) isn't exactly a classical use of the word, but it's the best I know of.

Looking on the link you gave, my eye fell on "dux", which I'm using for the werewolfie men of higher rank, who are in charge of specific things like "security", "intelligence", "construction", "procurement" (of food and goods). When I took a second look at that, I realized it's listed as being both a masculine and feminine noun. Is there a reason not to use it for women as well as men?

Pac-man's domina is probably your best bet. You might add mea before, as this is the phrase that begets our modern 'Madam'.
Would Mea Domina relate closer to "my lady" or "Lady Smith"? Either way, I like it. I just don't want to abuse the usage.
 
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