Latin Exercises

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Maybe. I guess it makes sense to call it that, but it seems derivative of the jussive at least.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Hey guys, there's a thread in the Latin-English (which should really be in the English-Latin section) to translate Bachelor's in Business Administration.

The closest word that I could find for "Bachelor's" is baccalaureus. "In" in this case doesn't seem to be referencing a sense of space or time. I was looking for entries in this dictionary & I'm not sure which entries for "in" would be the most appropriate (which also means I'm not sure which preposition should be used or if I should just use a bare ablative). What type of "in" would this be?

Other than that, (supposing that I go with a bare ablative) I've got administratione negotii.

Any thoughts guys (especially about the "in" situation)?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Well, the word bachelor comes from the Mediaeval Latin word baccalaureus or baccalarius (which has been used as an academic title since the late Middle Ages as well), so that's what you should go with.
in should just be rendered with a genitive and no preposition here.
I would have called it baccalaureus negotii gerendi, I suppose ...
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Why would you use gero here? Does gero somehow convey the idea of "administration"?

Is the genitive gerund used as a way to avoid a conflict between two genitive nouns next to each other?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
negotium gerere is an expression that means "to do business, trade"
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
negotium gerere = to conduct business
gerendi is not a gerund, but a gerundive here.
Latin is usually not as keen on nominal expressions as English is. There's nothing wrong with recursive genitive nouns per se, but they often don't sound very idiomatic to me. If you want to get a word akin to administratio in there, I would prefer negotii administrandi, but administrare and negotium didn't seem to be used together.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Guten morgen Bitmap, there's a translation request that I'm trying my hand at again.

Here was the request:
The spell itself is very simple. The English words I have are, "Possess this vessel." Possess can mean take over, dwell in, live in, or straight up possess. Vessel can mean body, instrument, flesh, etc.

As an incantation, it sounds like "possess" would be imperative. I chose the verb teneo & to use the word "body" instead of vessel, but I don't think that tene hoc corpus rolls off the tongue very well. Tene hoc vas sounds like it rolls off the tongue better but to stick with "vessel" (vas), it's entry in L&S refers to an "implement of any kind". It seems like it may be referring to literal tools. Could this be extended in a figurative sense to apply to people?
 

Cinefactus

Censor
Staff member
Your sig is getting pretty long @R. Seltza. You might want to shorten it a little.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I would have said posside or occupa rather than tene.

As for vas, I think it works, if not from a classical point of view then at least from a biblical one, which kind of seems to be in the spirit of the request anyway.

Cf. Acts 9:

10 Erat autem quidam discipulus Damasci, nomine Ananias: et dixit ad illum in visu Dominus: Anania. At ille ait: Ecce ego, Domine. 11 Et Dominus ad eum: Surge, et vade in vicum qui vocatur Rectus: et quaere in domo Iudae Saulum nomine Tarsensem: ecce enim orat. 12 (Et vidit virum Ananiam nomine, introeuntem, et imponentem sibi manus ut visum recipiat.) 13 Respondit autem Ananias: Domine, audivi a multis de viro hoc, quanta mala fecerit sanctis tuis in Ierusalem: 14 et hic habet potestatem a principibus sacerdotum alligandi omnes qui invocant nomen tuum. 15 Dixit autem ad eum Dominus: Vade, quoniam vas electionis est mihi iste, ut portet nomen meum coram gentibus, et regibus, et filiis Israel. 16 Ego enim ostendam illi quanta oporteat eum pro nomine meo pati. 17 Et abiit Ananias, et introivit in domum: et imponens ei manus, dixit: Saule frater, Dominus misit me Iesus, qui apparuit tibi in via qua veniebas, ut videas, et implearis Spiritu Sancto. 18 Et confestim ceciderunt ab oculis eius, tamquam squamae, et visum recepit: et surgens baptizatus est. 19 Et cum accepisset cibum, confortatus est.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Your sig is getting pretty long @R. Seltza. You might want to shorten it a little.
"Getting pretty long"? Lol, it's been this length for nearly a year now. :p
Was the sig character limit reduced (lol or did LCF beg you to say this behind the scenes or something)?

I would have said posside or occupa rather than tene.

As for vas, I think it works, if not from a classical point of view then at least from a biblical one, which kind of seems to be in the spirit of the request anyway.
Alright, I'll go with occupa hoc vas.

Thanks guys.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Hey @Pacifica, I was looking at the thread Liberate Us.

As a translation, you provided "Libera nos a vexatoribus nostris et rumpe catenas quae nos vinciunt."
I came up with "Libera nos a tyrannis nostris et disrumpe catenas quas nos ligant."

Wouldn't a tyrant be more suiting? Wouldn't quae have to agree with the accusative catenas?
 

Issacus Divus

H₃rḗǵs h₁n̥dʰéri diwsú
It’s been a while, Seltz.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
No, it's the subject of the relative clause.
I was wondering about something. Looking at this sentence:
Quoniam filii sanctorum sumus et vitam illam expectamus quam Deus daturus est his qui fidem suam numquam mutant ab eo. -
For we are the children of saints, and look for that life which God will give to those that never change their faith from him.

Why would qui be accusative here?

It’s been a while, Seltz.
No, it's only been a couple of millennia. :p
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I was wondering about something. Looking at this sentence:
Quoniam filii sanctorum sumus et vitam illam expectamus quam Deus daturus est his qui fidem suam numquam mutant ab eo. -
For we are the children of saints, and look for that life which God will give to those that never change their faith from him.

Why would qui be accusative here?
Because it's the direct object of daturus.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Isn't daturus a masculine participle? Why would the feminine version of qui be used?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Hey guys,

Is there a word in Latin to refer to the idea of "excess" in the context of a noun?

If more context is needed, I'm referring to usage such as "They wanted to live a life of abundance, luxury, and excess".
 
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