Latin Exercises

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"shouted" isn't an indirect statement.

"that he wanted to speak with the consul" is.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
That – Relative Pronoun – “Qui

"That" is not a relative pronoun, not even in English. An indirect statement is not a relative clause. In classical Latin, indirect statements are realised by an AcI that is dependent on a finite verbum dicendi. You've just done it the other way round: You turned the verb of the main clause that should actually be finite into an infinitive. clamare needs to agree with homo and the "(he) wants" needs to be non-finite.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Homo, currens per multitudinem, se/sese velle clamavit qui cum consule loqui.

Not sure about the word order when incorporating 3 different verbs in a sentence like that.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
What's the syntactic function of the qui in your sentence?
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
None, really. I forgot that indirect statements don't need connecting words like "that".
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Good.

"A soldier replied that the consul was busy."
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
What is the difference between se & sese anyways?
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Are there any participles or verbs to convey the idea of being busy (especially if there is such a thing as a "past-tense participle)?

The closest thing that I could find was occupatus, but that won't really suffice...
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Yes, you can translate "He is busy" as "occupatus est" --- but you need to make it dependent on a verbum dicendi.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
Yes, you can translate "He is busy" as "occupatus est" --- but you need to make it dependent on a verbum dicendi.
Bitmap, could you elaborate on this?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
What I meant was that in order to translate the sentence above, you first need to find a way of saying "The soldier replied/said/answered/responded/claimed" - the words I underlined are verba dicendi, verbs that express some idea of speaking.
These words usually trigger an accusative with infinitive when they introduce indirect speech, so "occupatus est" must be made inflected/changed and fit into an AcI construction.
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
“A soldier replied that the consul was busy.

A – Indefinite Article – Becomes a Ghost
Soldier – Singular Nominative Noun – “Miles”
Replied - 3rd Person Active Indicative Singular (Perfect Tense) Verb – “Respondit”
That – Connecting Word – Indirect Statement Present – Gets Dropped
The – Definite Article – Becomes a Ghost
Consul – Singular Noun – Accusative Case (Subject of Indirect Statement) – “Consulem
Was Busy – Verbal Adjective (Participle) – Must Agree With Consulem - AcI Construction – “Occupatum Est

Miles respondit consulem occupatum esse.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
I forgot to change that in the parsing section... :brickwall2:
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
"Marcus tells Publius that Claudia has gone to Rome."
 

R. Seltza

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure if I missed it, if it was never posted, or if I just have a bad memory on this, but in Ignis Umbra's post on indirect statements, I don't recall seeing what should be done with words like Publius in this situation (though I do have the rest of the parsing standing by).
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Publius becomes the indirect object (dative object) of dicere.
 
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