Latin Insults

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Pati muliebria: to undergo women's things = of a man, to get sodomized etc.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Alicui ore morigerari: to be compliant to someone with the mouth = I think you understand.

Suetonius, Vita Tiberi, 44.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Pedem or pedes tollere = to lift (one's or someone else's) leg(s) to adopt a position appropriate for the thing.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris
Pedem or pedes tollere = to lift (one's or someone else's) leg(s) to adopt a position appropriate for the thing.
Pedem or pedes tollere = to lift (one's or someone else's) leg(s) to adopt a position appropriate for the thing.
I have to admit that I don't always get these: "the thing"? Next you'll doing like the old translations of Martial and leaving out the saucy bits.

And "Alicui ore morigerari: to be compliant to someone with the mouth": I thought initially perhaps to pay lip service:confused: (which one could maybe understand in a few ways also, and I maybe will from now on!)





And I see that for "conveniebat vaginam tuam machaera militis" earlier, you avoided the translation altogether. It's getting very 19th century-ish around here. :poke: ("poke", as they say)


A nod is as good as a wink to a cow in the dark.

For people into word roots, I came upon this book: quite nice.

By the way: keep it up: this is great for my Latin, - what beats Martial? - check out his 10.75: not rude at all, but wonderful, though brutal.
But do please give sources when possible.
 

Lysandra

Canis
Here are some great Latin insults to add to the list (from the latest edition of the Horrible Histories magazine). Be warned: these phrases are EXTREMELY RUDE! ;)
IMG_0466.JPG
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I don't know where they got vos odorandum from, but I suspect Google Translate or similar.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Can anyone make sense of "vos odorandum"?
I would've guessed "You smell" is "oletis" or "oles"

"Get the fuck out of here" can also be expressed as abi in malam rem / in malam crucem
but amove te is also fine I think
 

Lysandra

Canis
To be honest, I wasn't entirely sure about "vos odorandum" either. I thought it meant something like "you must be smelt" because "odorandum" is a gerundive...but that doesn't much sense either. I've tried to look up this phrase on the internet to see where the writers of the article could have taken it from. The only thing I've found so far is this line here and I'm not sure what its source is...

vos odorandum flores, sed quasi anima tua est putrida
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
omnium non solum bipedum sed etiam quadrupedum spurcissimus

"The foulest not only of all bipeds but even of all quadrupeds."

Applied to Helagabalus by senators after his death, according to the Historia Augusta.

I've never read the Historia Augusta before, yet this phrase rings a bell. I wonder if I have seen it quoted somewhere before or if I have met a similar one in another work.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Indeed, a very similar one occurs in Cicero's De Domo Sua, and that's where I saw it:

Hoc tu scriptore, hoc consiliario, hoc ministro omnium non bipedum solum sed etiam quadrupedum impurissimo, rem publicam perdidisti.
 
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