Latin minimal pairs distinguished only by vowel length

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
That's not a minimal pair.
The thread title does say 'minimal pairs', but if you read the first post, the OP in fact asks merely for 'words which are distinguished only by vowel length' and includes the example of pārēre vs. parere.
 

Michael Zwingli

Active Member
That's not a minimal pair.
I suppose that I'm not entirely sure what "minimal pair" means, in any precise way. As Iason indicated, I was following the example given by Philip initially. How about hōc the adverb and ablative masculine/neuter singular of hic, vs. hoc nominative and accusative neuter singular of hic?
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
I suppose that I'm not entirely sure what "minimal pair" means, in any precise way.
It means that the words must differ in exactly one place (and there, usually in only one feature of their pronunciation). iugis and iugis would differ in two.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
It all depends whether inflections of the same word count as minimal pairs. Do they? Technically yes, I guess...?
 

Iáson

Cívis Illústris
Ah, I see... How does the hōc/hoc example work?
They differ in only one phoneme, ō vs. o. Thus they constitute a minimal pair.
It all depends whether inflections of the same word count as minimal pairs. Do they? Technically yes, I guess...?
I don't quite understand. Why wouldn't they?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member

Serenus

legātus armisonus
maria 'seas'
Mariā (nom.), Mariae (gen.) 'the Virgin Mary' (mostly in 4th-5th century poetry, from Greek Μαρίᾱ)
Marīa 'the Virgin Mary' (mostly in 6th century poetry and later, cf. Spanish María)

Examples:
Intrat virgineam: "Sanctus tē spīritus", inquit, / "Inplēbit, Mariā. Christum pariēs, sacra virgō."
(Prudentius, Dittochaeon 99-100; 4th c.)

Inde Deī genetrīx pia Virgŏ Marīa corūscat / virgineōque agnī dē grege dūcit ovēs.
(Venantius Fortunatus, Carmina 8.3; 6th c.)
 
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