Latin song: Tellus dormit et liberi in diem faciunt numquam

Anima

New Member
Lol, yeah, I know. But that was to this Latin:

Tellus dormit et liberi in diem faciunt numquam extinguunt ne* expergisci possint. Omnia dividit tragoedia coram amandamque et nocte perpetua ehem vel vera visione par oram videbo te mane tempus expergiscendi.


I was wondering if you could adjust it to this latin:

Tellus dormint et liberi in diem/ingem faciunt numquam extinguunt nec experisci possint. Omnia dividit tragoedia coram amandamque/amandum quae. Et nocte perpetua et/ehem desperatione pavor omnivere pona? manet tempus expergiscendi.


The problem with the firt translation was that it didnt make much sense at all. And I know you cant make up the Latin to fit the English, but it was a bit weird, if you know what I mean...

Maybe you could interpret it more loosely? For example, faciunt means act, but can it also mean to sacrifice or to suffer? Because that would make more sense in the context.

http://catholic.archives.nd.edu/cgi-bin ... io&ending=
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
To interpret facio in that way you have to have something with it. In the example given by nd.edu (which is a fairly good dictionary by the way, I used it until I got WORDS, but it has some merits over WORDS), "cum", "ab homine", and/or troubles are involved. Like I said, I wouldn't put it past SE to make a song that makes no sense in a language that is quite different from the two they work the most in. (As another example of this, the chant "Fithos Lusec Wecos Vinosec" from Liberi Fatali doesn't even mean anything in any language, though it is an anagram for a few different things.)

Anyway, fixing illogical typos and removing slashes in yours, we go from:
Tellus dormint et liberi in diem/ingem faciunt numquam extinguunt nec experisci possint. Omnia dividit tragoedia coram amandamque/amandum quae. Et nocte perpetua et/ehem desperatione pavor omnivere pona? manet tempus expergiscendi.
To:
Tellus dormit et liberi in diem faciunt numquam extinguunt nec expergisci possunt. (it's either ne...possint or nec...possunt) Omnia dividit tragoedia coram amandamque. Et nocte perpetua... (it gets too garbled to work with here, what you found makes no sense and I'm not going to try)...manet tempus expergiscendi.
Thus:
The land sleeps and the children [faciunt, however you want to interpret it] into the day. They never exstinguish and they cannot awaken. The tragedy divides all things [and] the pupil of the eye and the beloved. (SE took out an "and", which you actually need in a list in Latin, assuming that the -que is correct, which it seems to be, especially to rhyme with what I am almost certain is a "te" later on. As an aside, amanda is literally "she who will be loved" or "she who should be loved", it's just awkward to put that into the translation.) And in a perpetual night...(garbled)... the time of awakening remains.

Pardon the enormous number of edits.
 

Anima

New Member
Thanx for that.

Yeah, fithos lusec wecos vinosec = Succession of witches.

Btw, how did you get 'the pupil of the eye'. Its just strange. Really strange.

I might interpret faciunt as 'suffer.'

The garbled bit is a bit of a bummer. Idk what to make of it. Im confident that I hear deperatione now (thanks to Andy).


Perhaps its. 'And in a perpetual night depairs and suffers everything till the time of awakening.'

Or is that too far fetched.
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
It's not in nd.edu, but WORDS (which is linked to on nd.edu) cites cora, -ae as "pupil of the eye" but calls it "Late very rare." (It's the derivative of the adverb coram which is shown on nd.edu; the idea is that an accusative preposition such as ad (lit. "to", but has a bunch of other meanings) or prope (near) is implied, creating an adverbial expression.)

Now, I know I've been snapping at SE a lot in this thread, but having omnia as an adjective describing tragoedia is CERTAINLY not something I would put past SE (considering the Liberi Fatali mistake I have already mentioned several times. It should be omnis if this is the case by the way.)

That would make it:
All the tragedy divides the pupil of the eye and the beloved. (This makes some sense; the tragedy forces the lover to be unable to see his beloved.)

Really though, as said by the comments on youtube, we really should wait on official lyrics from SE, as trying to play this by ear won't likely get us a perfect Latin or English.
 

Anima

New Member
Lol, the first paragraph completely lost me.

I think we'll just have to wait, as your last paragraph said. Tis a little shame.

Perhaps Ill leave it as:

The land sleeps and the children suffer into the day. They never exstinguish and they cannot awaken. The tragedy divides all things [and] the pupil of the eye and the beloved.

And in a perpetual night depairs and bears everything till the time of awakening.


Also, in that sentence 'The tragedy divides all things and the pupil of the eye', do you hear a 'vir' anywhere in there?
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Andy dixit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBh3Xs8LwcE&mode=related&search=

This link contains a video with better sound quality, QMF, don't know if it may help you.
OK...observations:
Clearly it's ne...possint here. The "ne" is unclear but the "i" in "possint" is distinct, and nec...possint makes little sense.
And mane tempus, not manet tempus.

Honestly other than that it's the exact same as what I heard earlier...I think I'm gonna have to stick with what I heard on this one.
 

curiosus

New Member
Andy dixit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBh3Xs8LwcE&mode=related&search=

This link contains a video with better sound quality, QMF, don't know if it may help you.
Better sound, indeed. She says "caram" not "aram", and "possint" not posse. So, what I think she sings (between gulps of sake) is:

Deus dormit et liberi ignem faciunt, numquam extinguunt, ne expergisci possit. Omnia dividit tragoedia, caram amandamque. Et nocte perpetua et desperatione pavor omnia deportat, manet tempus expergiscendi.

God sleeps, and his sons make fires, so he (god) cannot wake up. Tragedy tears apart all the dear and beloved things (she says caram amandamque but probably she meant to say omnia cara amandaque). And fear carries everything away with a continuous night and desperation. The time of awakening awaits/remains.

If she means caram amandamque, though, the only possible translation is: tragedy tears apart everything, (and) the dear and beloved (woman).
 

Andy

Civis Illustris
Maybe 'omnia' is an adverb here...

"... tragedy, in all respects, tears apart the beloved and what is to be loved"
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Erm, what of numquam extinguunt, curiosus? It can't refer to ignem, as that is singular.

I also really do hear coram, though caram makes more sense (and cara makes more sense than that.)

Otherwise it's quite convincing.
 

Anima

New Member
Thats a nice translation. Although I dont hear 'ignem'. I hear 'ingem' or 'in diem'. And I too think it sounds more like 'coram', but I guess it could be either. It could be 'tellus' or 'deus'. Its too hard to tell IMO.

For 'omnia deportat', would it make any sense if it were 'omnifere portat?' The 'de' that you proposed seems too drawn out. I also hear something like 'ehim desperatione'.

Other than that, I think the Latin is very accurate.


Is there a possible translation for this:

Tellus/Deus dormit et liberi in diem/ingem faciunt, numquam extinguunt, ne expergisci possit. Omnia dividit tragoedia, caram/coram amandamque. Et nocte perpetua ehem desperatione pavor omnifere portat, manet tempus expergiscendi.
 

curiosus

New Member
quemquem me facis dixit:
Erm, what of numquam extinguunt, curiosus? It can't refer to ignem, as that is singular.
I think it refers precisely to ignem: ignem faciunt, numquam extinguunt (they make a fire/fires, they never extinguish it/them)
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Oh...man I'm slacking lately. I should've noted that it was transitive, not intransitive.
 

Andy

Civis Illustris
The problem with 'ignem' is that even in Ecclesiastical Latin, it would still have a hard 'g', right?

IG·NEM not IY·NEM...

and the sound plays out as injem.
 

Anima

New Member
Sorry for dragging this out. Would it be possible of you could do one final translation for this:

Tellus dormit et liberi in diem faciunt, numquam extinguunt, ne expergisci possit. Omnia dividit tragoedia, caram/coram amandamque. Et nocte perpetua et/ehem desperatione pavor omnifere portat, manet tempus expergiscendi.

After listening again, Im afraid I dont hear 'ignem' or 'Deus.'

After this, I promise I wont pester you anymore.
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
Omnifere is simply not a word. It has to be something else. Anyway, skipping words that are not words:
The land/kingdom (tellus literally means land by the way) sleeps and the children act into the day. They never extinguish, lest they be able to awaken. (It's possint, by the way.) The tragedy divides all things and the beloved before the eye [of...? You don't know, which is part of the point.] And in a perpetual night, behold! (ehem, not et; another et would be silly.) fear brings [whatever omnifere is] in desperation, [and] the time of awakening remains.

And there's no reason to leave, the more the merrier!
 

Andy

Civis Illustris
Perhaps it's a both... and... conjunction.

Et nocte perpetua et desperatione
Both perpetual night and despair
 
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