Latin song: Tellus dormit et liberi in diem faciunt numquam

QMF

Civis Illustris
I still hear vel vera visione...Which would be:
In a perpetual night, or (perhaps) a true vision, I, [your] equal, will see you; the time of awakening remains.

I should listen again though. I have a strictly audio file on my comp that I suppose I could host somewhere, though it unfortunately still has the gunshots.

Hmm...I think I hear "pavorem videbo te" which of course doesn't make sense (assuming SE didn't make a mistake) since you'd have a vocative (pavor, videbo te) in that case.

Other than that I stand by my previous analysis fully.

Another listen...yep, par oram is what I hear, go figure.
 

QMF

Civis Illustris
But then what form would omnifere be? -er, -era, -erum adjectives are declined like puer (puer, puerum, etc.) in the masculine, not as a third declension noun. So it would have to be some other form. I'm trying to be open here even though I feel almost certain that it is "par oram videbo te."
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Wow - okay it's 2008 now! And the track has been released under the title. Somnus.

So I joined just to post this here... my latin is extremely limited, however with the track alone - without gun shots and fighting etc. here is what I could discern:

«Tellus* Dormit
Et liberi in diem faciunt
Numquam Exstinguunt
Ne expergisci possint

Omnia Dividit
Tragedia coram
Amandum quae

Et nocte perpetua
Ehem vel** vera visione
Par oram videbo te
Mane tempus expergiscendi»

This is from ear - and what y'all posted collaborated.
* Note she does pronounce it with the spanish «LL.»
** I'm not entirely sure, but I think I hear «Ves/Vex;» albeit, I can't find a plausible meaning with either ves or vex. However I can also hear «vespera» (instead of vel vera - vespera) but I don't think evening prayer(?) makes sense there.

My translation reads:

«
The kingdom Sleeps,
And children suffer everyday.
Never extinguished,
The cannot awake.

In front of them
This tragedy destroys every beloved thing,

And this perpetual night,
There! with true sight/vision
On the edge I’ll see you.
Next* morning, we will awake.»

This is, again, a conglomerate of the previous posts, and research I've done using different dictionaries.

* I find no word to mean «next» here, but I feel it makes the sentence... more understandable?

I hope this helps some - if some wish I can post a link
as to wear to obtain the song sin the gun shots and fighting.

Track:
Drammatica - Somnus - Yoko Shimamura
edit:
Pleaseeeee don't dock this post!!! I just wanted to get out as much as I could.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Sorry I'm posting this ... this thread is quite old and might best be left alone, but I found it very interesting. Just a few remarks:

Celsius dixit:
Tellus* Dormit
I think Tellus makes most sense here, not because of the singer's pronunciation, but because the song is called 'Somnus' and appears to be set in the dream world. "Tellus dormit" would then be a way of describing the fact that it's night without actually saying it. I think we all agree that something like "nox est" would sound like a really cheap alternative. From the rest of the song, I see no good interpretation for "Deus dormit", though.

Andy dixit:
The problem with 'ignem' is that even in Ecclesiastical Latin, it would still have a hard 'g', right?

IG·NEM not IY·NEM...

and the sound plays out as injem.
According to what I read about the pronuntiatus restitutus 'ignem' is supposed to be pronounced like 'ingnem' with no hard g at all.

To my mind, assuming it is ignem at least adds some sense to the first part of the text - as opposed to in diem [every day], for in this case an object to faciunt and extinguunt would be missing. According to my dictionary, at least the latter desperately needs an object, otherwise it has to be used as a medium verb - in which case it would have to be "extinguuntur".

QMF dixit:
Clearly it's ne...possint here. The "ne" is unclear but the "i" in "possint" is distinct, and nec...possint makes little sense.
I think so, too. "Ne expergisci" sounds like a contraction in the version I heard: "N'expergisci" -- this is the way it's done in ancient poems.

translation: "So that they cannot wake up" ... Sounds good. The action seems to be set in a dream, maybe the children are aware of this and want to stay there a little longer :)

Don't ask me why fire keeps them awake, though

Celsius dixit:
Omnia Dividit
Tragedia coram
Amandum quae
Surprisingly, no one suggested putting a semi-colon after tragoedia and starting a new sentence: "Curram amandemque" - "I shall run and ban all (these) things" [taking omnia as the object from the previous part]
I know that this, too, is arguable, since she doesn't really seem to sing 'amandem' ... still, maybe this offers some new thoughts helping to solve that crux

QMF dixit:
I still hear vel vera visione...Which would be:
In a perpetual night, or (perhaps) a true vision, I, [your] equal, will see you; the time of awakening remains.
vel vera visione makes a lot of sense. It just doesn't seem to be very good style by the song writer: "Et nocte perpetua vel vera visione"?? Why not "Vel nocte perpetua vel vera visione" or "Et nocte perpetua et vera visione"?

As for the very last sentence, assuming it's 'Mane' rather than 'Manet' sounds good, too: "Mane tempus expergisciendi" - "Await the time of awakening". Since the song seems to be about a dream, I like this suggestion a lot.

Hmm...I think I hear "pavorem videbo te" which of course doesn't make sense (assuming SE didn't make a mistake) since you'd have a vocative (pavor, videbo te) in that case.

Other than that I stand by my previous analysis fully.

Another listen...yep, par oram is what I hear, go figure.
Another suggestion: "Parvolam videbo te" - "I will see you being a little girl [you as a little girl]"

As I said earlier, since this song may be about a dream, as is suggested by the title "Somnus" - "Sleep", it leaves a lot of room for interpretation. Why not the vision of a girl being put back into the days of her youth?

I don't think the song necessarily has to have any sensible relation to Final Fantasy. Why would anyone bother if most people don't understand it anyway (or may not care if they do)?? The fact that it's Latin makes it sound cool enough ;)
 

Anima

New Member
^Thank you for your suggestions..

Btw, I created a new-er topic about this recently.

viewtopic.php?t=3814

There's the link. Look at the bottom for my final version of the translation - I hope you like it. The reason I created a new topic was because they released a version of Somnus without the background music so we were able to hear the words much more cleary.


This song is for a game called Final Fantasy Versus XIII, coming for PS3. I assume that the lyrics relate to the plot and themes of the game. The story and characters are going to be completely original.
 
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