Latin words for magic spells in a book to be published

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Hello Jodi,
I understand that your "spell formula" consists of three elements
I. Invocation - "Clan name" e.g.
II. Command/request toward the invocated Clan name "Ignite my power"
Jodi Nicholls dixit:
For example:
accendo -cendere -cendi -censum, to kindle, set alight, set on fire. Transf., to fire, inflame, excite.
Jodi Nicholls dixit:
fire or kindle a flame/bolt/whirlwind/tornado/stream of water/ blow a gail/fire a firbolt/strike with lightning... etc.
III. The content of the spell e.g. either infinite form (as provided by you in your first post) or as nominative case of certain occurrence/phenomenon.

If yes, then let us proceed to the translation.
Example:
(Clan name "Lightning)! Ignite my power! A strike with lightning/a lightning strike!
Fulmen! Vim meam excita*! Ictus fulmineus**!
translation: Lightning (clan)! Excite/arouse my power! A strike with ligthing/ a lightning strike!
* I used word "excito" - arouse, excite, bring out (there is a verb "ignio" but it does not refer to initing power but setting something on fire/making it red hot;)
**Totius Latinitatis Lexicon,

Now let us work on the vocative cases of your clan names
1) Lightning - please use Fulmen!, not Fulgor (fulgor is both rare and medieval)
2) water - Aqua!
3) ice - Glacies!
4) air - Anima! (OK, Anima is gramatically OK for element; however I would rather use Aer! but this is just my opinion)

The second part of your spell (command toward clan) Vim meam excita!

Now the third part of your spell formula (infinitive forms; however I will also give you imperative forms singular II person active and passive subjunctive like "may he/she be kindled/set on flame - following Nick's previous pattern:
to kindle (something/someone)/set on fire - incendere (inf), incenda (kindle/set on fire him/her/it); incendatur (may he/she/it be kindled, set on flame)
bolt - I need exact info what kind of bolt
Tornado/Violent Whirlwind - Turbo/Typhon; Turbo/Typhon fiat:) (let there be a tornado)
stream of water - Rivulus/Flumen Aquae; Fluatur Aqua! - let the water flow/stream!
blow a gail - I have no idea:confused:
fire a firbolt: to fire a firebolt (inf) - ictum igneum iacere/mittere; ictum igneum iace/mitte (imperative); iaciatur/mittatur ictus igneus (let the firebolt be sent/cast/thrown)
A strike with lightning/ a lightning strike - Ictus fulmineus! Ictus fulmineus fiat (let there be a lightning strike);
strike her/him/it down with a lightning! (imperative) - fulmine preme/ fulmine ad terram afflige
may he/she/it be striked down with a lightning - fulmine prematur/fulmine ad terram affligatur
 

Jodi Nicholls

New Member
Many thanks for that Adrian! You've got the structure I want, although I'd like the word of power to be said first, followed by the clan name (unless that doesn't work?) Do you know of any names that might be one word and mean 'ignite?' So it's snappy, like: "Dicio, Incendium, mittatur ictus igneus." - [Ignite], [Clan name], [action].

I kind of like that Fulgor is medieval sounding, but I take it that's completely awful?! I don't mind Fulmen either though... Also, I don't know why, but Aqua is so common is annoying me everytime I write it. I'd like something that means water, but a better name... maybe a bit of artistic licence?! (See last post for a list of all the words I've used as spells, and if you can see that they're wrong let me know!) I do like Aer, but it's too short and sounds like the English word air when spoken. (I know that's a bit anal, but I like the words to sound old and magical!) :cool:

I might be in over my head here, but I'm loving all the suggestions so far, it's really helping me bring my book together and make it less hopeful and more intelligent! When a friend said using Latin in my book would be difficult, they weren't wrong. I'm just hoping my readers aren't all Latin experts! :D
 

Adrian

Civis Illustris
Many thanks for that Adrian! You've got the structure I want, although I'd like the word of power to be said first, followed by the clan name (unless that doesn't work?) Do you know of any names that might be one word and mean 'ignite?' So it's snappy, like: "Dicio, Incendium, mittatur ictus igneus." - [Ignite], [Clan name], [action].
Please have in mind that "ignite my power" can not be directly translated into latin as "igni/accende vim meam"; ignire, inflagrare; conflagrare, accendere refer strictly to igniting/setting something or someone on fire. "to ignite a power" = "to arouse it/bring it out or forth" hence excitare or incitare

You can change the spell structure e.g. Vim meam excita, Fulmen! mittatur ictus igneus! (PS. Why do you use the "Dicio" and "Incendum"???

I kind of like that Fulgor is medieval sounding, but I take it that's completely awful?! I don't mind Fulmen either though... Also, I don't know why, but Aqua is so common is annoying me everytime I write it. I'd like something that means water, but a better name... maybe a bit of artistic licence?! (See last post for a list of all the words I've used as spells, and if you can see that they're wrong let me know!) I do like Aer, but it's too short and sounds like the English word air when spoken. (I know that's a bit anal, but I like the words to sound old and magical!) :cool:
If you like Fulgor you can stick to it. I simply prefer Fulmen over Fulgor.
Water....
perhaps:
nympha, n
declension: 1, gender: F
1. (semi-divine female nature/water spirit)
2. bride
3. nymph
4. water
5. young maiden
 

Jodi Nicholls

New Member
Thank-you! I like Lympha actually. The Lympha clan... sounds pretty! Although reminds me a little of Lymphatic drainage! :confused:

Jodi,

Here's my suggestions for the watery parts (and by extension any other element) though, cavere, this may complicate matters.

The Romans viewed the world in a very syncretic way, which was often taken a little farther by the poets. It isn't uncommon for elements to be referred to by their mythological counterparts (e.g. Lympha in lieu of "fresh water"). Now, if you wanted to conjure up ideas of magic alongside the words which you are using to cast any given spell, then this is the route I would take.

N.B.

1) These choices have inescapable connotations and you must be familiar with the Padora's box which you are opening.
2) As these are proper names, grammatical construction will become more tricky (e.g. the awareness of agency in grammatical construction).
 

Jodi Nicholls

New Member
Please have in mind that "ignite my power" can not be directly translated into latin as "ignite vim meam"; ignire, inflagrare; conflagrare, accendere refer strictly to igniting/setting something or someone on fire. "to ignite a power" = "to arouse it/bring it out or forth" hence excitare or incitare

You can change the spell structure e.g. Vim meam excita, Fulmen! mittatur ictus igneus! (PS. Why do you use the "Dicio" and "Incendum"???
Ah ok, I see! :)

I used 'Dicio' because it was a word with 'power' attached to it. In my book, the spells all have an ancient structure. They need to call on the power in their blood, speak their clan name and then what they want the spell to do. They have to use words to give the spells form (it's possible to do it without words, but speaking the spell is a safe way of making sure it does exactly what's intended - a control about it that thoughts without extreme concentration - akin to meditation - don't always have! Especially for an unaccomplished Mage). Once the spell is spoken, the Mages can then use their own artistic licence to control/destort/concentrate it to their own means with their will.

If one of my Mage's performs an incantation, they must first say 'Dicio' (to ignite their power in their blood), then their clan name (I used Incendium as an example as it's the fire clan, obviously Glacies, Anima etc is used depending on the Mage performing the spell) and then the action of the spell - so a fire, a tornado etc etc.

Does that make any sense?!

:rolleyes:
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Dissolvo Release something/someone from a binding/promise. Dissolve.
Cresco crescere crevi cretum Be born, rise up, grow, come into existence… Cresce = "Grow!"
Igniculus Spark/create flame. Igniculus is a noun = "little flame."
Evincio Send away, release into heaven, free a spirit. Evince. But you may want another word.
Torqueo torquere torsi tortum Violent winds, create a tornado. I thought I explained about the 4 parts of the verb. Maybe torque turbinem/torque typhonem,
Aqua et igni interdicere homini Banish, outlaw. Are aqua and igni your mages here, or is it idiomatic? Lewis and Short have aqua et igni interdicere = "to forbid (someone) the use of fire and water = to banish" But if you're trying to say "fire and water, forbid that human," it would be aqua et ignis, interdicite hominem.
Inardesco Small flame/light, warming presence. Inardesco is a verb. Maybe you could combine this with igniculus = "little flame." Ignicule, inardesce!
Deresco, durescere, durui What does this even mean?! You're the one that wrote it. Is someone helping you?
Deflagro Incinerate. Deflagra.
Flabra Create a blast of air. Flabrum (pl. flabra) is a noun.
Aura Lift upwards (perhaps on a gust of air?) Aura (pl. aurae) is a noun.
Zephyrus Bring forth a warm west wind. Zephyrus (no plural? Zephyri if there is) is a noun.
Aduro Create a slight nippy wind. Adure = "scorch/singe/burn"
Equito Rush of air/wind. Equita is "ride (on horseback)"
Auster, Concido Bring about a south wind to subside an enemy. Auster, concide = "O South Wind, destroy."
Caminus Of fire – here the spell is a rope of fire an Incendium Mage uses as a whip. Caminus = "furnace," although fornax is more common.
Fulgor A Mage with the magical properties of Lightning.
Glacies A Mage with magical properties of Ice.
Incendium A Mage with the magical properties of Fire. The alchemical elements were terra, aer, ignis, and aqua.
Anima A Mage with the magical properties of Wind/Air.
Aqua A Mage with the magical properties of Water.
Cento Shield – of fire (an actual shield made of fire). cento = "quilt." How about scutum?
Concido Release (to release a spell). Concide. (But then you told the South Wind to concide with a different meaning.)
Amburo Engulf in flame. Ambure.
Succendo Set on fire – (from below). Succende.
Elementum One who can control all the elements. This would be an element itself.
Evalesco Mages – ones with power. Evalescentes?
[…]Becoming Become/reach potential. Your translator couldn't handle it?
[…]Awakening Ignite/awaken power within. Your translator couldn't handle it?
Inferus Malus Deepest Evil/Devil/etc.
Prester Whirlpool/maelstrom. I used turbo and typho earlier. Prester is rare.
Circumplico Wind, fold together. Circumplica.
Exanimis Dead, lifeless, low.
[…] A resurrector/someone who can bring the dead back to life.
More later...
 

Summus Mus

Member
Does that make any sense?!
err. . .

So akin to "Power, of the Mighty Mice, I use/call on you to Camember-ify X?" If this is what you intend there are a few issues. I think your choice of the noun in the nominative is at odds with "calling on" said power. If the power is doing the cheesemaking, that's another story.

Deresco, durescere, durui What does this even mean?! You're the one that wrote it. Is someone helping you?
present active dūrēscō, present infinitive dūrēscere, perfect active dūruī. (no passive)
  1. I harden

Lympha?? You mean Nympha... right?

Edit: OK, I checked with dictionary... yes Lympha is also a water nymph.
Catullus 27 if you'd like to see it in context.
 

Jodi Nicholls

New Member
Dissolvo Release something/someone from a binding/promise. Dissolve.
Cresco crescere crevi cretum Be born, rise up, grow, come into existence… Cresce = "Grow!"
Igniculus Spark/create flame. Igniculus is a noun = "little flame."
Evincio Send away, release into heaven, free a spirit. Evince. But you may want another word.
Torqueo torquere torsi tortum Violent winds, create a tornado. I thought I explained about the 4 parts of the verb. Maybe torque turbinem/torque typhonem,
Aqua et igni interdicere homini Banish, outlaw. Are aqua and igni your mages here, or is it idiomatic? Lewis and Short have aqua et igni interdicere = "to forbid (someone) the use of fire and water = to banish" But if you're trying to say "fire and water, forbid that human," it would be aqua et ignis, interdicite hominem.
Inardesco Small flame/light, warming presence. Inardesco is a verb. Maybe you could combine this with igniculus = "little flame." Ignicule, inardesce!
Deresco, durescere, durui What does this even mean?! You're the one that wrote it. Is someone helping you?
Deflagro Incinerate. Deflagra.
Flabra Create a blast of air. Flabrum (pl. flabra) is a noun.
Aura Lift upwards (perhaps on a gust of air?) Aura (pl. aurae) is a noun.
Zephyrus Bring forth a warm west wind. Zephyrus (no plural? Zephyri if there is) is a noun.
Aduro Create a slight nippy wind. Adure = "scorch/singe/burn"
Equito Rush of air/wind. Equita is "ride (on horseback)"
Auster, Concido Bring about a south wind to subside an enemy. Auster, concide = "O South Wind, destroy."
Caminus Of fire – here the spell is a rope of fire an Incendium Mage uses as a whip. Caminus = "furnace," although fornax is more common.
Fulgor A Mage with the magical properties of Lightning.
Glacies A Mage with magical properties of Ice.
Incendium A Mage with the magical properties of Fire. The alchemical elements were terra, aer, ignis, and aqua.
Anima A Mage with the magical properties of Wind/Air.
Aqua A Mage with the magical properties of Water.
Cento Shield – of fire (an actual shield made of fire). cento = "quilt." How about scutum?
Concido Release (to release a spell). Concide. (But then you told the South Wind to concide with a different meaning.)
Amburo Engulf in flame. Ambure.
Succendo Set on fire – (from below). Succende.
Elementum One who can control all the elements. This would be an element itself.
Evalesco Mages – ones with power. Evalescentes?
[…]Becoming Become/reach potential. Your translator couldn't handle it?
[…]Awakening Ignite/awaken power within. Your translator couldn't handle it?
Inferus Malus Deepest Evil/Devil/etc.
Prester Whirlpool/maelstrom. I used turbo and typho earlier. Prester is rare.
Circumplico Wind, fold together. Circumplica.
Exanimis Dead, lifeless, low.
[…] A resurrector/someone who can bring the dead back to life.
More later...
This is so helpful, thank-you!!

No, I don't have any help - I wish I did have a translator, but an editor won't edit Latin! If I had the money, I would hire one, but as you guys are so amazing, hopefully it won't come to that. :)

I've been writing this book for years, so in some parts, I can't really tell what I'm trying to convey!

present active dūrēscō, present infinitive dūrēscere, perfect active dūruī. (no passive)
  1. I harden
*Ahem, ok, probably not quite what I meant! :oops:

err. . .

So akin to "Power, of the Mighty Mice, I use/call on you to Camember-ify X?" If this is what you intend there are a few issues. I think your choice of the noun in the nominative is at odds with "calling on" said power. If the power is doing the cheesemaking, that's another story.
Huh?!

There's a structure to the spells (just because) and then once a power is out there, the conjurer can bend it to their will.

I suppose I wanted a word to ignite the power, the Mage name and then the action. I am open to all suggestions for spell structure however, anything that works, makes sense and won't make you lot smack your heads with shame if you ever read my book!

:D
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Jodi,

I pointed out that the alchemical elements were terra (earth), aer (air), ignis (fire), and aqua (water).
But we've turned to lympha and nympha for water (are all your mages female?).
If you want mythology, maybe you could do: Neptunas (pl. Neptunades) - water; Vulcanas (pl. Vulcanades) - fire; Mercurias (pl. Mercuriades) - air; and I'd suggest Jupiter (genitive Jovis) for "lightning." But what would be the "offspring of Jupiter?"
Jovias? (pl. Joviades?)
I don't think any of these characters exist; I'm just coining them (but patterned after Dryas, Naias, and Oreas) to avoid aer and aqua.

 

Summus Mus

Member
Supreme Mouse, do the honors and tell Jodi what does it mean accoridng to Catullus;)
According to Garrison vos. . .lymphae "is simply an apostrophe to the water nymphs, who spoil the wine by diluting it. . ." My dear Adrian, you aren't suggesting that there are sexual connotations in our sacred Catullus are you?! Double entendre wasn't invented until the court of Louis XIII. No no, that couldn't be the case, for if so, we'd be out of mons, silva, and saltus as well!
 
The four elements are generally named by their ſhortest, ſimplest, moſt baſic, and most ordinary names in whatever language is being uſed.
Thus in Latin they generally to be found as 'terra, aer, ignis, aqua'.

Now as to your title: 'Evaleſco' would ordinarily be read as the first person ſingular preſent of an inchoative compound of the verb 'valere' (be strong) and as ſuch it would moſt naturally mean 'I become ſtrong', though it might, by extenſion, mean 'I win out' or 'I prevail'.
 
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