Libera me, Domine, Iesu Christe, ab omnibus iniquitatis meis

checking

New Member
Can you confirm this is correct?

LIBERA me, Domine, Iesu Christe, ab omnibus iniquitatis meis et universis malis, fac me tuis semper inhaerere mandatis et a te numquam separari permittas. Amen.


DELIVER me, Lord Jesus Christ, from all my iniquities and from every evil, make me hold ever fast to Thy commandments and never allow me to be separated from Thee. Amen.



Thanks in advance.
 

Imprecator

Civis Illustris
Re: Confirm this prayer 'Libera me'

Shouldn't this be in the 'Latin to English Translation' section?
As for the prayer itself, yes, the English rendering is accurate.
 

checking

New Member
Re: Confirm this prayer 'Libera me'

oh yea sorry, well just look at it backwards lol

so anyway, it's all correct?
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
Re: Confirm this prayer 'Libera me'

Topic moved. Yes, it is correct.
 

Imprecator

Civis Illustris
angus dixit:
...ab omnibus iniquitatibus...? (ablative plural agreeing with omnibus).
That's true, the prayer itself even says "iniquitatibus".
Probably a simple slip-up during transcription.
 

checking

New Member
So how should the full thing be written?


Also, how would I go about finding the correct pronunciation of it?
 

Imprecator

Civis Illustris
"Libera me, Domine, Iesu Christe, ab omnibus iniquitatibus meis et universis malis, fac me tuis semper inhaerere mandatis et a te numquam separari permittas. Amen."

Pronunciation:

LEE-ber-AH MAY, DAW-mee-ne, YAY-soo KRIS-tay, ah-b AWM-KNEE-boos MAY-ees eh-t oo-KNEE-ver-SEAS MAL-EES, FAHK (careful!) meh TOO-ees SEM-pair in-HI-RAY-reh MAHN-dat-EES eh-t ah TAY noom-KWAM SAY-par-AW-REE PAIR-meet-ahs. ah-MEN.

In all seriousness, it's impossible to teach pronunciation over the web.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Imprecator dixit:
"Libera me, Domine, Iesu Christe, ab omnibus iniquitatibus meis et universis malis, fac me tuis semper inhaerere mandatis et a te numquam separari permittas. Amen."

Pronunciation:

LEE-ber-AH MAY, DAW-mee-ne, YAY-soo KRIS-tay, ah-b AWM-KNEE-boos MAY-ees eh-t oo-KNEE-ver-SEAS MAL-EES, FAHK (careful!) meh TOO-ees SEM-pair in-HI-RAY-reh MAHN-dat-EES eh-t ah TAY noom-KWAM SAY-par-AW-REE PAIR-meet-ahs. ah-MEN.

In all seriousness, it's impossible to teach pronunciation over the web.
Well, you could use Pseudo-IPA, that would render it quite closely. The way you did it is a bit confusing ... e.g. it creates the impression that the o and the i in dominus or omnibus are long or that universis is stressed on the first i (when the stress actually is univérsis)... or that the a in fac is long when it's actually pronounced like "f u c k".
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
I don't think fac was pronounced like "fuck", exactly, or at least not as "fuck" is pronounced in most English dialects. The English schwa is usually a mid central vowel [IPA: ə], a sound which probably didn't occur in Latin (except perhaps in rapid speech for short a in unstressed positions, but fac would be stressed regardless).

Latin short a was more likely an open front vowel [IPA: a], a sound not represented in every English dialect (it doesn't occur in mine, for example): i.e. the vowel in Australian (or Bostonian) "car", but shorter.

I'd say fac is still close enough to "fuck" to embarrass an English speaker, though.
 

Nikolaos

schmikolaos
Staff member
I pronounce the short "A" in Latin as in "that word". I tend to lengthen the vowel in fac, though, since I am practically never alone when I practice. If I ever came across the term "fac me", I think I'd just skip over it :p
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Imber Ranae dixit:
I don't think fac was pronounced like "fuck", exactly, or at least not as "fuck" is pronounced in most English dialects. The English schwa is usually a mid central vowel [IPA: ə], a sound which probably didn't occur in Latin (except perhaps in rapid speech for short a in unstressed positions, but fac would be stressed regardless).
I'm not sure I understand that, Imber.
The /ə/ in English doesn't usually occur in stressed positions (where vowels tend to have full vowel quality).
fuck would be transcribed as /fʌk/ in IPA... Granted /ʌ/ is not exactly the same quality as /a/, but probably the closest you can get within the English inventory of vowels.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus
joke

There is a Polish joke for Latinists: fac mi curva olera, which in that language means something like "prepare me the vegetables, god*****t!" :)

Curva is one of the most vulgar words in Polish.
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
Bitmap dixit:
I'm not sure I understand that, Imber.
The /ə/ in English doesn't usually occur in stressed positions (where vowels tend to have full vowel quality).
fuck would be transcribed as /fʌk/ in IPA... Granted /ʌ/ is not exactly the same quality as /a/, but probably the closest you can get within the English inventory of vowels.
I didn't mean to suggest that the vowel in fuck is a reduced vowel (I should have been more careful as the term 'schwa' is ambiguous). In General American, however, it has the same or nearly the same quality as schwa, i.e. a mid [ə] or open-mid [ɜ] central vowel. The designation ʌ traditionally used in dictionaries for this vowel is antiquated for most modern English dialects and no longer corresponds to the IPA. In Received Pronunciation it has shifted to the near-open central vowel [ɐ], making it actually quite a bit closer to the probable quantity of Latin short a. So again, it depends on the dialect.

As I was saying above, I think the Australian and Bostonian (both non-rhotic) pronunciation of the vowel in "car" probably most closely represents Latin short a. It's impossible to know for sure, though.
 
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