Inspirational LIVE TO LEARN FROM ANOTHER DAY

J.M

Active Member
Greetings,

Today I would like a phrase I came up with to be translated into Classical Latin if possible. It is based on another quote from Bear Grylls the phrase is the one on the thread title whilst the original phrase actually is Live to see another day,

Thank you,
J.M
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Here's my suggestion:

Singular: Vive ut alio die discas

Plural: Vivite ut alio die discatis

I'm about 80% sure that dies should be masculine here, but then again, I could be wrong. Thoughts, others?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The plural imperative is vivite.

Alio die means "on another day". You need ex for "from".

I'm also a bit doubtful about translating "live to..." literally, as it's kind of an idiom here. But I don't have any better idea.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
The plural imperative is vivite.
Oops. I'll correct it.
Alio die means "on another day". You need ex for "from".
I understand that, but I interpreted "Live to learn from another day" as "live so that you can learn something on another day". A "day" itself can't teach you anything, unless maybe you're observing the actual daylight cycle. But maybe that's what's meant here.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
A "day" itself can't teach you anything
It can, in a metaphorical sense. You can learn something from a day because you can draw some lessons from what you've seen, heard, or experienced on that day. That's how I interpret the English, and I don't think there's any reason not to reproduce the metaphor in Latin.
 
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Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
That's a valid perspective, but ex aliquo discere seems strange for "to learn from someone". Isn't that pretty much the same thing as "to learn by means of someone"?
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Discere ex aliquo or ex aliqua re is a normal construction. Some examples can be found here.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
The plural imperative is vivite.

Alio die means "on another day". You need ex for "from".

I didn't have too much of a problem with that ... I didn't think the metaphor was so convincingly deep that it had to be retained at all cost; but all of what you wrote is right, too, of course. You might as well retain it.

That's a valid perspective, but ex aliquo discere seems strange for "to learn from someone". Isn't that pretty much the same thing as "to learn by means of someone"?

I think discere ex aliquo is the best way to put it, actually. (I guess you can also go with ab or de, but ex is fine).
 

J.M

Active Member
It can, in a metaphorical sense. You can learn something from a day because you can draw some lessons from what you've seen, heard, or experienced on that day. That's how I interpret the English, and I don't think there's any reason not to reproduce the metaphor in Latin.
That is what I was interpreting, couldn't have said it better myself,
J.M
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus
Yeah; I actually looked it up in L&S right after Bitmap confirmed my earlier suspicion.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
In prose, the feminine version is often used in the sense of an appointed day (e.g. a day on which a sum is due or things like that). Apart from that it's indeed rare.
 

LCF

a.k.a. Lucifer
In prose, the feminine version is often used in the sense of an appointed day (e.g. a day on which a sum is due or things like that).
Did not know that. Good know.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Hence: dies irae, dies illa...

This is medieval Latin; I think it was only classical prose (Cicero/Caesar) that really ever made such a hard distinction between the masculine and the feminine form.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
The feminine is indeed used more randomly in late/medieval Latin (as in one of my favorite Bible passages: pereat dies in qua natus sum et nox in qua dictum est 'conceptus est homo' etc.).

Ascribing the classical distinction only to Cicero and Caesar may be a bit of an exaggeration, though. I haven't studied the question but I'm almost sure the distinction was also made by Silver Age authors, at least most of the time.
 

Bitmap

Civis Illustris
Ascribing the classical distinction only to Cicero and Caesar may be a bit of an exaggeration, though. I haven't studied the question but I'm almost sure the distinction was also made by Silver Age authors, at least most of the time.

What I meant was: I think they were the ones who really tried to make a distinction (but I don't know how it was handled before them), and then there were of course still a lot of people imitating them, but I think it died off over time and became arbitrary eventually (or maybe in common speech, it has always been).
 

Callaina

Feles Curiosissima
The feminine is indeed used more randomly in late/medieval Latin (as in one of my favorite Bible passages: pereat dies in qua natus sum et nox in qua dictum est 'conceptus est homo' etc.).

Ascribing the classical distinction only to Cicero and Caesar may be a bit of an exaggeration, though. I haven't studied the question but I'm almost sure the distinction was also made by Silver Age authors, at least most of the time.

Arguably that is a sort of "established day" -- his birthday.
 
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