Locus carminum vel aliorum Latine vertendorum

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

2. room full of cowardly stay-at-home senators
YOU WRITE conclave ignavis senatoribus confertum,
ADD "domi manentibus” ???
Yeah, I left it out because I couldn't find something that I liked.
3 He won’t take me on again in a hurry:
YOU WRITE: “non iam deridebit me!
RATHER: non provocabit me temere in proelium. ???
In fact I didn't understand the English. I heard "he won't take me... again...", so I just made up something that seemed likely in the context....!
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

1. YOU WRITE: crediderat fore ut hilara frequentia viae impletae, floribus plateae constratae sint. Crediderat se accepturum nuntios de tribuendo triumpho

The “credere” and "Acc + inf" OK, but “credere” and “ut”??
IS IT THE SAME?
The infinitive is fore, on which the result clause introduced by ut depends, so it's not credere ut but credere fore [=futurum esse] ut. This is a common kind of periphrasis in Latin.
I did make a mistake there, though, but with the sequence of tenses. I need essent and not sint.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Latine (quod est ostendendum. potestisne adiuvare?)
Vis adiuvemus ad corrigendum quod tu transtuleris, an ipsi transferamus?
 

LVXORD

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

carmen transferam sed sum nunc occupatus...
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Bene. :)
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Si auxilio tibi opus est, LVXORD, ad te iuvandum assumus. ;)
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Here's the first part of a more recent song. The lyrics are a bit weird, but I'll do my best. The song is "What does the fox say?" by Ylvis.


Anglice

Dog goes woof
Cat goes meow
Bird goes tweet
and mouse goes squeak

Cow goes moo
Frog goes croak
and the elephant goes toot

Ducks say quack
and fish go blub
and the seal goes ow ow ow

But theres one sound
That no one knows
What does the fox say?

Latine

Canis latrat,
Felis "meow" dicit,
Avis zinzulat,
Et mus murrit,

Vacca mugit,
Rana coaxat,
Et barrus "toot" dicit.

Anares tetrinniunt,
Pisces "blub" dicunt,
Et phoca "au au au" dicit,

Sed unus sonitus,
quem nemo novit,
Quid vulpis dicit?
 

LCF

One of "those" people

  • Civis Illustris

"L'amour est un oiseau rebelle"


L'amour est un oiseau rebelle
Que nul ne peut apprivoiser,
Et c'est bien en vain qu'on l'appelle,
S'il lui convient de refuser.

Iambic tetrameter (with some substitutions allowed)

AMOR rebellis āles est,
domāre nēmo quem potest.
inque arcessīre, pol, vānum,
nōlī recūsātūrum illum.

| AMOR | rebel | lis ā | les est, |
| u - | u - | u - | u - |
| domā | re nē | mo quem | potest.|
| u - | u - | u - | u - |
| nōlī | que grā | tuīto | illum |
| inque ar | cessī | re pol | vānum, |
| - - | x- | u - | - u |
| nōlī | recū| sātūrum | illum. |
| -- | u - | x - | -u |
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

What is this that stands before me?
Figure in black which points at me
Turn around quick, and start to run
Find out I'm the chosen one
Oh nooo!
Big black shape with eyes of fire
Telling people their desire
Satan's sitting there, he's smiling
Watches those flames get higher and higher
Oh no, no, please God help me!
Is it the end, my friend?
Satan's coming 'round the bend
People running 'cause they're scared
The people better go and beware!

I'm not quite sure what the lines in bold are meant to be, imperatives or first person. "Turn around quick and start to run" makes sense as an imperative, but I would find "find out I'm the chosen one" weird as an imperative. So I made the fisrt imperative, the second first person, I don't know if I'm right.

Quid hoc est quod ante me stat?
Figura nigra veste amicta, quae me digito monstrat?
Averte te cito et curre!
Me esse electum reperio.
Eheu!
Magna forma nigra igneis oculis,
quid cupiant hominibus dicens,
sedet illic Satanas, subridet,
spectat illas flammas altius altiusque flagrare.
Eheu, quaeso, Deus, iuva me!
Finis, amice, adestne?
Mente labitur Satanas,
Homines currunt quia timent
Abeundum hominibus et cavendum est!
 

Abbatiſſæ Scriptor

Senex

  • Civis Illustris

Et barrus "toot" dicit.

Anares tetrinniunt,
Faſcinating how the ſupposedly echoic imitations of animal ſounds vary ſo much from one human language to another.
The elephant's line you have eſſentially tranſlated as 'trumpeter ſays 'toot''. Perhaps 'barrire' might derive from ſomething echoic, but 'tetrinnire'? Surely no hanſeriform makes such a noise. Perhaps the cry if ſome other bird randomly reaſſign'd.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Culpa Luciferum. :p E loco quem is mihi demonstravit verba sonituum animalum venerunt.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Sorry for the huge bump guys, but I felt I should resurrect this thread, as I recently thought of a song from a very popular movie series (in the US anyway): Harry Potter. I never knew until a few minutes ago that part of the song was Latin...!


Latine:

Ferte in noctem animam meam
Illustrent stellae viam meam
Aspectu illo glorior
Dum capit nox diem

Cantate vitae canticum
Sine dolore actae
Dicite eis quos amabam (I think this really should be amavi, but whatever)
Me nunquam obliturum.

Anglice:

Carry my soul into the night
May the stars light my way
I glory in the sight
As the night takes the day

Sing a song of life
Lived without regret
Tell the ones, the ones I loved
I never will forget.
 

Ignis Umbra

Ignis Aeternus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

limetrees

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

WB Yeats.
textilia coeli exoptat.

si coeli textilia picta haberem
luce intexta argenteā aureāque,
textilia caerulea hebetia et fusca
noctis et lucis et dubiae lucis,
textilia haec sub pedes tuos dispanderem.
sed pauper tantum somnia mea habeo;
somnia mea sub pedes tuos dispando.
leniter ingredere, nam somnibus meis ingrederis

WB Yeats
He wishes for the cloths of Heaven

Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half-light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.



Mistakes spotted? Opinions? Suggestions? Improvements?
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

What is this that stands before me?
Figure in black which points at me
Turn around quick, and start to run
Find out I'm the chosen one
Oh nooo!

I'm not quite sure what the lines in bold are meant to be, imperatives or first person. "Turn around quick and start to run" makes sense as an imperative, but I would find "find out I'm the chosen one" weird as an imperative. So I made the first imperative, the second first person, I don't know if I'm right.

Quid hoc est quod ante me stat?
Figura nigra veste amicta, quae me digito monstrat?
Averte te cito et curre!
Me esse electum reperio.
Eheu!
I think both are just first person: I turn and (try to) run, but then find out it's me he wants.

Me averto cito et currere coepio, [sed] reperio me electum esse.
 

LCF

One of "those" people

  • Civis Illustris

WB Yeats.
textilia coeli exoptat.

si coeli textilia picta haberem
luce intexta argenteā aureāque,
textilia caerulea hebetia et fusca
noctis et lucis et dubiae lucis,
textilia haec sub pedes tuos dispanderem.
sed pauper tantum somnia mea habeo;
somnia mea sub pedes tuos dispando.
leniter ingredere, nam somnibus meis ingrederis

WB Yeats
He wishes for the cloths of Heaven

Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half-light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.


Mistakes spotted? Opinions? Suggestions? Improvements?

Have you seen textilia used for a rug/cloth somewhere by poets? At a first pass it sounds a bit too technical a term and rather boring.

Vestes would bring more colors. We have many poets use vestes in similar metaphors. (I've read that vestire/convestire luce is attributed to be first coined by Cicero).

For example in the Lucretius:

quam subito soleat sol ortus tempore tali​
convestire sua perfundens omnia luce.​

and many other places.

tapes might be another choice.

Removing extra adjectives, the metaphor boils down to this:

Coelestes si haberem vestes, eis sub pede vestirem viam tuam. Sed quoniam mihi pauperi tantum sunt spes, quas dispando sub pede tuo, molliter calces precor. [EDIT: yes, I meant, calces]

Yeats in essence says "If I was a god, I would. But I am a poor wretch.", another beautiful version of Sappho 31.

Catullus 51:

Ille mi par esse deo videtur,
ille, si fas est, superare divos,
qui sedens adversus identidem te
spectat et audit

etc...

Cheers

PS: somnia is of course not a good choice of vocab here. Spes in singular or plural is much better.
 

limetrees

Civis Illustris

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

LCF: Thanks for all this. Very interesting and I will definitely have to bear it all in mind.

 
Top