Marius - Marios

Mariusdownunder

New Member
Can anyone translate my name Marius to Latin. I have some confusing info on how it was spelled in Latin. Most translations seem to take to the name Marios instead..
 

Iohannes Aurum

Technicus Auxiliarius
Good news! Marius translates to Marius. How convenient.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
I confirm. Marius is originally a Latin name. It could also have been spelled Marios in archaic Latin, but in classical Latin Marios would be the accusative plural, "Mariuses" as the direct object of a verb.
 

LVXORD

Civis Illustris
I think Marius would be Μάριος. I don't know if the Modern Greek would differ from the Ancient Greek form.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
So Marius is not translated to Μάριο, Μάριος or μάριος ?
Those are Greek letters. Latin is written with our letters - the Latin alphabet. Or do you finally want Greek?
 

scrabulista

Consul
Staff member
Was a proper name ever used as a common noun in the plural? (Marios)

In the singular, there's that ille Paris quotation in the Aeneid but I can't think of anything in the plural.
In English, there's the expression "every Tom, Dick, and Harry."
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Was a proper name ever used as a common noun in the plural? (Marios)
There can be several people with the same name, and so you can refer to them in the plural, yes. Now I'm not sure you would call that a "common noun", I think it remains classified as proper name.

A Cicerones:

ut meum iudicium reprehendi a Quinto fratre vulgoque ab omnibus mallem quam illum non efferre me laudibus Ciceronesque nostros meo potius labore subdoceri quam me alium iis magistrum quaerere
http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/cicero/att8.shtml

A Marios:

vincerent ac sibi haberent, dum modo scirent eum, quem incolumem tanto opere cuperent, quandoque optimatium partibus, quas secum simul defendissent, exitio futurum; nam Caesari multos Marios inesse.
http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/suetonius/suet.caesar.html
 

Imber Ranae

Ranunculus Iracundus
A Marios:

vincerent ac sibi haberent, dum modo scirent eum, quem incolumem tanto opere cuperent, quandoque optimatium partibus, quas secum simul defendissent, exitio futurum; nam Caesari multos Marios inesse.
http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/suetonius/suet.caesar.html
This one doesn't refer to different people named Marius, but to the same famous Roman general Gaius Marius who precipitated the First Civil War and fought against Sulla. It means that Caesar was going to have all the skill in battle and shrewd political acumen of Marius several times over.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
This one doesn't refer to different people named Marius, but to the same famous Roman general Gaius Marius who precipitated the First Civil War and fought against Sulla. It means that Caesar was going to have all the skill in battle and shrewd political acumen of Marius several times over.
But it's still in the plural, as if there were several Mariuses (or people like that Marius) in him. ;)
 
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