Marshal of Skara

I'm going to add a rank to Her Imperial Majesty's Military that translates into Marshal, which will be equivalent to NATO's OF-10 pay grade and only able to be held by the Empress. Would the Skaran Latin translation be Imperator Skarani or Imperator Skaranum (nom.)? I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be ablative, accusative, dative, or vocative.

(Short vowels to avoid 403 error)
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Imperator Skaranus would be "Skaran emperor". "Skaran empress" would be imperatrix Skarana.

The translation of "marshal" is a bit more complicated. There's no exact term for that in classical Latin. There is medieval Latin mariscalcus, whence the word "marshal" itself is derived, but I guess it meant something a bit different at the time. It might still be the best option, though. If it's to be applied to the empress, I guess it should be made feminine, mariskalka (adopting the Skaran "k" as well).
 
Thanks. Although, the Sargons eliminated grammatical distinction between males and females by preferring the entry that comes first alphabetically. Thus, imperator would have been preferred, if imperatrix even existed, and Skaran adjectives only ending a -a or -um.
 

Pacifica

grammaticissima
Staff member
Ah. And what are the rules for using the endings -a and -um? Do masculine nouns (like imperator) take the formerly feminine (-a) or the formerly neuter ending (-um)?
 
Nope. They survive unless there's a female variant that precedes them alphabetically as in dea/deus. The one very notable exception is Era, meaning Empress, which comes after dominator/dominatrix.
 
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