Martini Cromeri ex primo libro de origine & rebus gestis Polonorum nonnulli loci dubii

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Location:
Varsovia
Salvete! I'll keep my comments in English so that a wider audience may respond/offer insights to some rather doubtful passages/expressions.


1628008058137.png



First thing here: any idea what ab inclinatione could refer to? Surely this is about the ongoing fall of the empire in the West? Maybe "alteration, change"?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1628008258407.png



I remember Pacifica once explained this particular mediaevalism ut est videre or something of the like, but I don't exactly recall what that was.
"as one can see" perhaps?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1628008731101.png



caeperant - surely a mediaeval corruption of ceperant?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1628009226631.png


cum eos ??? Surely not the preposition but the conjunction was meant?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1628009467466.png


"vituperium" ---> meaning clear enough, however, no such word exists in either L&S or OLD; another mediaevalism, I take it?

Again, any input, insights, or suggestions are greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance.
 

LCF

One of "those" people

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Apud Inferos
View attachment 15621


First thing here: any idea what ab inclinatione could refer to? Surely this is about the ongoing fall of the empire in the West? Maybe "alteration, change"?

Biondo's greatest works were Italia illustrata (Italy Illuminated, written between 1448 and 1458, published 1474) and the Historiarum ab inclinatione Romanorum imperii decades (Decades of History from the Deterioration of the Roman Empire, written from 1439 to 1453, published in 1483).
 
Last edited:

LCF

One of "those" people

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Apud Inferos
I remember Pacifica once explained this particular mediaevalism ut est videre or something of the like, but I don't exactly recall what that was.
"as one can see" perhaps?
Oh look at how they talked. A very pretty expression.
 

Bestiola

Praetor

  • Praetor

Vituperium appears in Du Cange: http://ducange.enc.sorbonne.fr/vituperium

And in Italian dictionaries - there's an Italian word vituperio, from late Latin vituperium:
"dal lat. tardo vituperium, der. di vituperare «vituperare»".
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Location:
Varsovia
Yeah, L&S and OLD aren't everything. I typed in "vituperium" but couldn't come up with anything. Thanks, Brunny! ;)
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Location:
Varsovia
Oh look at how they talked. A very pretty expression.
Not my "classical Ciceronian" taste, but how do you understand it?
 

LCF

One of "those" people

  • Civis Illustris

Location:
Apud Inferos
Not my "classical Ciceronian" taste, but how do you understand it?
Same.

ut opus est videre, ut facile est videre etc.. etc.. but combined.
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Location:
Varsovia
Sure, like Gibbon said. ;)
 

Matthaeus

Vemortuicida strenuus

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patronus

Location:
Varsovia

Pacifica

grammaticissima

  • Civis Illustris

  • Patrona

Location:
Belgium
"as one can see" perhaps?
Yes. Est in this construction with the infinitive basically means "it is possible (to)". The construction is very common in Greek, and appears occasionally in Latin even in the classical period—perhaps it was copied from Greek.
caeperant - surely a mediaeval corruption of ceperant?
Yes.
cum eos ??? Surely not the preposition but the conjunction was meant?
The conjunction wouldn't seem to make any sense, either. It's presumably just a mistake or misprint for cum eis.
 
Top